Jana Welkerling

Jana Welkerling
University of Tuebingen | EKU Tübingen

Master of Science

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4
Publications
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Publications (4)
Article
Full-text available
Background Mental disorders are prevalent and cause considerable burden of disease. Exercise has been shown to be efficacious to treat major depressive disorders, insomnia, panic disorder with and without agoraphobia and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Methods This pragmatic, two arm, multi-site randomised controlled trial will evaluate the...
Article
Full-text available
Background The Covid-19 pandemic is affecting the entire world population. During the first spread, most governments have implemented quarantine and strict social distancing procedures. Similar measures during recent pandemics resulted in an increase in post-traumatic stress, anxiety and depression symptoms. The development of novel interventions t...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Covid-19 pandemic is affecting the entire world population. During the first spread, most governments have implemented quarantine and strict social distancing procedures. Similar measures during recent pandemics resulted in an increase in post-traumatic stress, anxiety and depression symptoms. The development of novel interventions to mitigate...

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Projects (2)
Project
Evidence suggest exercise as an effective treatment for depressive patients. Different meta-analytic results show that exercise leads to medium to large effects on depressive symptoms. Even though effects of exercise on depression show good evidence, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Rumination is one potential mechanism, that has been reported repeatedly and is characterized as “a mode of responding to distress that involves repetitively and passively focusing on symptoms of distress and the possible causes and consequences of these symptoms” (Nolen-Hoeksema, Wisco, & Lyubomirsky, 2008). Evidence, that exercise is beneficial for rumination itself is lacking, because, on the one hand, there are only a few studies to date and, on the other hand, these studies show methodological limitations. As a result, the first goal of our project is to examine, whether exercise can affect rumination within depressed patients and thus be the underlying mechanism of the antidepressant effect of exercise. Newer research also examined neurophysiological correlates of rumination and found that rumination is associated with specific patterns of activation, for example in the PFC. Therefore, the second goal of our study is to use the neurophysiological patterns of rumination to analyse the impact of exercise on rumination. To establish a neurophysiological indicator of ongoing (“state”) rumination, we develop decoding models which decode rumination within depressed patients from neurophysiological EEG and fNIRS data patterns. These decoders are used, to predict rumination after exercise.
Project
A growing body of research suggests moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) to be ef-fecacious in improving psychopathological symptoms of mental disorders with a high preva-lence, such as major depression, anxiety disorders and insomnia. In spite of its efficacy and applicability, no exercise intervention has yet been developed for the outpatient psychothera-peutic context. To fill this gap, we developed the 12-week exercise intervention “ImPuls”, based on the current evidence about the therapeutic efficacy and (sustainable) promotion of MVPA in outpatients with mental disorders. Between February 2018 and October 2019, the department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, in cooperation with the Institute of Sports Science (Prof. Dr. Gorden Sudeck) of the University of Tuebingen, evaluated the efficacy (i.e., reduc-tion of psychopathological symptoms, increase of the extent of MVPA) of ImPuls in a random-ized controlled trial. A sample of N = 75 outpatients, suffering from at least one diagnosed men-tal disorder (major depression, anxiety disorders, insomnia), aged between 18 and 65 (M = 35.36, SD = 13.28) and waiting for psychotherapeutic treatment, participated in the study. Using stratified block randomization (stratified variables were age and severity of symptoms), partici-pants were allocated to an intervention group (IG; n = 38) or passive control group (CG; n = 37) when 6 to 10 patients were eligible (IG: n = 3-5; CG: n = 3-5) for study participation. To analyze the change in psychopathological symptoms (Symptom-Checklist-90®-Standard; Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, heart rate variability), we included group (IG vs. CG) as a between-subject variable and time (T1: pre); T3: post) as a within subject variable. To analyze the extent of sub-jectively reported MVPA (Physical Activity, Exercise, and Sport Questionnaire, BSA-F) we in-cluded group as a between-subject variable and time (T1; T2: week 9; T3) as a within subject var-iable. Objectively assessed MVPA (accelerometer) was analyzed with group as a between-subject variable at one time point (T2). Linear mixed models will be conducted to determine the change of psychopathological symptoms and extent of MVPA at T3. A linear regression model will be conducted to determine whether the change of symptom reduction was predicted by the increase of MVPA at T2 and T3. Analyses will be conducted using the intention-to-treat-sample. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03542396. We are currently collecting one-year follow-up data to test the maintenance of effects on psy-chopathological symptoms and the extent of exercise. Furthermore, between June 2020 and June 2023, ImPuls will be implemented and evaluated as an innovative health care project fund-ed by the “Innovationsfonds des Gemeinsamen Bundesausschusses (G-BA)” (see for more in-formation: https://innovationsfonds.g-ba.de/downloads/media/167/Liste-gefoerderte-Projekte-nVF-FBK-19-10-2018.pdf). The aim of the research project will be to evaluate the increase of care efficiency/reduction in waiting time for psychotherapy and the reduction of care costs by the implementation of ImPuls at 10 regional sports and exercise therapy centers in Baden-Württemberg (Germany).