Jana L. Raver

Jana L. Raver
Queen's University | QueensU · Smith School of Business

Ph.D.

About

43
Publications
93,190
Reads
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4,213
Citations
Introduction
My research examines interpersonal relations and team processes at work, particularly the ways in which employees support each other and build high-performance environments (e.g., helping, promoting learning) versus engage in counterproductive actions that undermine each other (e.g., harassment, bullying, conflict). I also study workplace diversity and cultural differences, including team diversity, cultural intelligence, and cross-cultural variations in conflict processes and control systems.
Additional affiliations
July 2004 - September 2020
Queen's University
Position
  • Professor
August 1998 - June 2004
University of Maryland, College Park
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
August 1998 - June 2004
University of Maryland, College Park
Field of study
  • Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Publications

Publications (43)
Article
Full-text available
Given increased interest in whether targets' behaviors at work are related to their victimization, we investigated employees' job performance level as a precipitating factor for being victimized by peers in one's work group. Drawing on rational choice theory and the victim precipitation model, we argue that perpetrators take into consideration the...
Article
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Organizations must learn and adapt to succeed in today’s ever-changing business environment, so it is essential for scholars to better understand the antecedents to learning processes among individuals, teams, and organizations as a whole. In this article, the authors offer a multilevel theory that illustrates how individuals’ motivation for differ...
Article
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This research examined the antecedents of organizational citizenship behavior helping norms in teams, specifically with regard to how members' personality, values, beliefs, and helping behavior predict the emergence of helping norms in newly formed project teams. We drew from theory on emergent phenomena and team composition research to propose and...
Article
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Norm enforcement may be important for resolving conflicts and promoting cooperation. However, little is known about how preferred responses to norm violations vary across cultures and across domains. In a preregistered study of 57 countries (using convenience samples of 22,863 students and non-students), we measured perceptions of the appropriatene...
Article
Full-text available
Norm enforcement may be important for resolving conflicts and promoting cooperation. However, little is known about how preferred responses to norm violations vary across cultures and across domains. In a preregistered study of 57 countries (using convenience samples of 22,863 students and non-students), we measured perceptions of the appropriatene...
Article
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Coworkers are a source of mixed emotions yet research on emotional ambivalence—i.e., the co-existing and intertwining positive and negative feelings toward a subject—toward peers in work groups is scarce. We draw from the literature on competitive dynamics in peer relationships to explore how women and men’s emotional ambivalence is elicited by the...
Article
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The current research integrates theory on the contextual characteristics that impact bystanders’ decisions to prosocially intervene against workplace incivility. We built a model based upon two of the most influential theories of prosocial intervention—Latané and Darley’s (1970) decision-tree model and Piliavin et al.’ (1981) arousal: cost-reward m...
Article
Our research was motivated by the goal of better understanding how male and female first-time entrepreneurs psychologically appraise key stressors during the business start-up process, and how these stress appraisals are related to psychological distress after business launch. Informed by role congruity theory (Eagly & Karau, 2002), we argue that f...
Article
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While scholars frequently argue that nascent entrepreneurs will be more successful if they are resilient, this assumption remains untested and the mechanisms for its potential benefits are unknown. To establish the utility of this psychological construct, we draw from Fredrickson's broaden-and-build theory (1998) to develop and test theory on the p...
Article
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As researchers who have advanced victim precipitation arguments in our own work on victimization and job performance (Jensen, Patel, & Raver, 2014), we agree fully with this statement made by Cortina, Rabelo, and Holland (2018): “A victim's traits or behaviors might help us understand why the instigator chose that particular person for abuse, but w...
Article
Organizational scholars have recently shown renewed interest in how workplace mistreatment impacts individuals, their well- being, and performance. While research has often examined the effects of mistreatment on various outcomes, (1) antecedents of mistreatment, (2) the mechanisms through which the effects occur, as well as (3) boundary conditions...
Article
Leaders can be positive and influential, motivating people in the organization to perform at their best. Leaders can also be controlling and abusive, using their elevated status as a way to misuse power. These different leadership styles can have relative effects on the individuals that report to the leader as well as to the organization as a whole...
Article
Research on leadership has typically focused on the positive side of the phenomenon and its beneficial implications for organizations and followers. However, history and recent events, such as the collapses of Enron and Lehman Brothers, have illustrated that there are undeniably plenty of ‘dark’ leaders and that their behaviors can be disastrous fo...
Article
Team composition research has largely focused on how the mean or variance amongst team member characteristics may influence team functioning, but such an approach fails to acknowledge that ‘difficult’ team members may have a disproportionately negative influence on the people around them, and have the potential to single-handedly impair team outcom...
Article
Individuals and organizations must continuously improve to succeed in today’s competitive economic climate, yet a major dilemma in tough economic conditions is that the resources needed to support such improvement behaviors are limited. Existing theories on resources, continuous improvement, and organizational stressors are relevant yet insufficien...
Article
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Scholarship on counterproductive work behavior (CWB) and related constructs (e.g., deviance, bullying, harassment, aggression, incivility, mobbing, revenge) has advanced the understanding of the factors that drive employees to engage in harmful actions at work and illuminated the effects of such behavior on individual, group, and organizational out...
Article
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Despite arguments for the benefits of self-management for enhancing employees’ motivation to work toward organizational goals, many managers fail to give their employees control and instead engage in surveillance to gain compliance. Drawing on personal control and reactance theories, the authors propose self-management would relate to increased dis...
Article
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Destructive criticism is negative feedback that is inconsiderate in style and content, which exists at the intersection of performance feedback and interpersonal mistreatment. The current research integrates these literatures with an investigation of the effects of destructive versus constructive criticism from a co-worker on recipients' relational...
Article
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With data from 33 nations, we illustrate the differences between cultures that are tight (have many strong norms and a low tolerance of deviant behavior) versus loose (have weak social norms and a high tolerance of deviant behavior). Tightness-looseness is part of a complex, loosely integrated multilevel system that comprises distal ecological and...
Chapter
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Sexual harassment has undoubtedly been a problem in organizations since they existed, but it was only 30 years ago that it began to be publicly recognized as a problem in need of intervention. In this chapter we review the phenomenon of sexual harassment, beginning with how it is defined, the different forms it may take, how it gets measured, and e...
Chapter
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Unfortunately, despite extensive efforts to educate organizational leaders and practitioners regarding how to build collaborative and respectful groups, the reality is that many groups are still characterized by high levels of interpersonally hostile actions amongst the members. These hostile acts have been variously called harassment, bullying, mo...
Article
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Despite scholars' and practitioners' recognition that different forms of workplace harassment often co-occur in organizations, there is a paucity of theory and research on how these different forms of harassment combine to influence employees' outcomes. We investigated the ways in which ethnic harassment (EH), gender harassment (GH), and generalize...
Chapter
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Benefits of Cross-Cultural Research in I-O PsychologyThe Cross-Cultural Research ProcessDetermining the Research Questions to be AnsweredAssessing the Constructs of InterestChoosing a MethodologyChoice of Task and InstructionsAssessing Additional VariablesDrawing Tentative Conclusions and Getting ConvergenceConclusion
Chapter
Neural Networks and Statistical ModelingNeural Networks and Psychological ProcessesCatastrophe Theory and Dynamic SystemsFinal CommentsNotesReferences
Chapter
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The purpose of this chapter is to review the nature of workplace aggression, to explore its overlap with conflict in organizations, and to provide several avenues for future inquiry based upon insights that can be gleaned from the integration of these two literatures. We begin with a review of construct definitions from the literature on the “dark...
Article
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[Excerpt] In what follows we present a systems model of discrimination at the level of the organization. We elaborate the model shown in Figure 1 and illustrate the ways in which aspects of organizations – including formal and informal structure, organizational culture, leadership, strategy, human resource systems, and organizational climates – may...
Article
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Cross-cultural research is dominated by the use of values despite their mixed empirical support and their limited theoretical scope. This article expands the dominant paradigm in cross-cultural research by developing a theory of cultural tightness-looseness (the strength of social norms and the degree of sanctioning within societies) and by advanci...
Article
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In this article we advance a distinctly relational view of negotiation. We delineate the conditions through which relational self-construals (RSC) become accessible in negotiations and the conditions that inhibit their use, and we illustrate mechanisms through which RSC affects negotiation processes and outcomes. We introduce four relational dynami...
Article
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Previous sexual harassment research and theory have focused primarily upon the individual level, with little attention to team- or organization-level outcomes. In this article, we extend research on outcomes associated with sexual harassment to the team level with an examination of the relationships between team ambient sexual harassment, team conf...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter, we illustrate the ways in which characteristics of organizations may contribute to or attenuate discrimination throughout the organization. Grounded within an open-systems model of organizations, we begin with a brief overview of environmental factors, such as the legal, economic, and social environment that serve as inputs into th...
Article
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In this article, we advance a cultural perspective on accountability in organizations. We seek to demonstrate that societal culture forces for accountability are found at multiple levels in organizations—from the individual, to the interpersonal and group context, and to the organization at large, which collectively form a loosely coupled accountab...
Article
Previous sexual harassment research and theory have focused primarily upon the individual level, with little attention to team-or organization-level outcomes. In this article, we extend research on outcomes associated with sexual harassment to the team level with an examination of the relationships between team ambient sexual harassment , team conf...
Article
Full-text available
The paper presents a case study of a bank illustrating how service excellence results from a tightly aligned and mutually reinforcing set of positive, service-focused internal human resource processes (training and development, teamwork, goals and rewards, and people). We introduce alignment as a central theme useful for thinking about how internal...
Article
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In this article, the authors advanced a cultural view of judgment biases in conflict and negotiation. The authors predicted that disputants' self-serving biases of fairness would be more prevalent in individualistic cultures, such as the United States, in which the self is served by focusing on one's positive attributes to "stand out" and be better...
Article
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Using data from 260 U.S. organizations, we found partial support for our hypotheses that demographic diversity of senior management would be positively associated with the diversity of the workforce, adoption of diversity practices, and power of an organization’s diversity/EEO officer, and that diversity practices impact organizational performance....

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