Jana Dobelmann

Jana Dobelmann
Ulm University | UULM · Department of Biology

PhD in Ecology and Biodiversity

About

11
Publications
2,219
Reads
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89
Citations
Citations since 2016
11 Research Items
89 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022051015202530
Introduction
I am an ecologist interested in host-pathogen communities. My research combines field studies with molecular tools and ecological modelling. Currently, I study how the introduction of a virus vector affects disease transmission in bee communities.
Additional affiliations
April 2021 - present
Ulm University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
April 2018 - April 2021
Victoria University of Wellington
Field of study
  • Ecology and Biodiversity
March 2015 - June 2017
University of Münster
Field of study
  • Biosciences
October 2011 - September 2014
University of Münster
Field of study
  • Biosciences

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
Within any one habitat, the relative fitness of organisms in a population can vary substantially. Social insects like the common wasp are among the most successful invasive animals, but show enormous variation in nest size and other fitness-related traits. Some of this variation may be caused by pathogens such as viruses that can have serious conse...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the mitochondrion's long recognised role in energy production, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation commonly found in natural populations was assumed to be effectively neutral. However, variation in mtDNA has now been increasingly linked to phenotypic variation in life-history traits and fitness. We examined whether the relative fitness in n...
Article
Full-text available
Emerging viruses have caused concerns about pollinator population declines, as multi-host RNA viruses may pose a health threat to pollinators and associated arthropods. In order to understand the ecology and impact these viruses have, we studied their host range and determined to what extent host and spatial variation affect strain diversity. First...
Article
Full-text available
A successful control or eradication programme using biological control or genetically-mediated methods requires knowledge of the origin and the extent of wasp genetic diversity. Mitochondrial DNA variation in the native and invaded range of the social wasp Vespula germanica was used to examine intra-specific genetic variation and invasive source po...
Article
Pest control methods that can target pest species with limited environmental impacts are a conservation and economic priority. Species‐specific pest control using RNA interference is a challenging but promising avenue in developing the next generation of pest management. We investigate the feasibility of manipulating a biological invader's immune s...
Article
Full-text available
Wasps of the genus Vespula are social insects that have become major pests and predators in their introduced range. Viruses present in these wasps have been studied in the context of spillover from honey bees, yet we lack an understanding of the endogenous virome of wasps as potential reservoirs of novel emerging infectious diseases. We describe th...
Article
Full-text available
Viruses are ubiquitous within all forms of cellular life, including ants. We documented the currently known viral infections described and their effects on ants. Our literature review found 87 different viruses (including 40 putative viruses and five bacteriophages detected via high-throughput sequencing) across 38 ant species. The majority of thes...
Article
Full-text available
Introduced social wasps (Vespula spp.) are a pest in many parts of the world. Recently, a mite species (Pneumolaelaps niutirani) was described and associated with disease symptoms in wasps. The mite does not appear to directly parasitise the wasps, but has been observed in high abundance, feeding on exudates from the mouths of larvae. We investigat...
Article
Full-text available
1. Variation in microbial communities between populations is increasingly hypothesised to affect animal fitness and performance, including for invasive species. Pathogenic species may be lost during the introduction process, enhancing invader fitness and abundance. 2. This study assessed fitness, immune gene expression, and microbial network comple...

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