Jan K. Woike

Jan K. Woike
University of Plymouth | UoP · School of Psychology

Dr. phil. (Psychology)

About

42
Publications
28,464
Reads
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1,194
Citations
Additional affiliations
June 2020 - July 2020
University of Plymouth
Position
  • Lecturer
October 2012 - May 2020
Max Planck Institute for Human Development
Position
  • Researcher
February 2008 - September 2012
University of Lausanne
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
February 2003 - February 2008
Ruhr-Universität Bochum
Field of study
  • Psychology
September 1997 - May 1998
Harvard University
Field of study
  • Special Student (Psychology, Philosophy, Dramatic Arts)
October 1994 - February 2001
Ruhr-Universität Bochum
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
Using computer simulation, we investigate the impact of different strategies on the financial performance of VCs. We compare simple heuristics such as equal weighting and fast and frugal trees with more complex machine learning and regression models and analyze the impact of three factors: VC learning, the statistical properties of the investment e...
Article
Full-text available
Fast-and-frugal trees (FFTs) are simple algorithms that facilitate efficient and accurate decisions based on limited information. But despite their successful use in many applied domains, there is no widely available toolbox that allows anyone to easily create, visualize, and evaluate FFTs. We fill this gap by introducing the R package FFTrees. In...
Article
Full-text available
Whether people compete or cooperate with each other has consequences for their own performance and that of organizations. To explain why people compete or cooperate, previous research has focused on two main factors: situational outcome structures and personality types. Here, we propose that—above and beyond these two factors—situational cues, such...
Article
Full-text available
During pandemics, effective nonpharmaceutical interventions encourage people to adjust their behavior in fast-changing environments in which exponential dynamics aggravate the conflict between the individual benefits of risk-taking and its social costs. Policy-makers need to know which interventions are most likely to promote socially advantageous...
Article
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People frequently engage in dishonest behavior at a cost to others, and it is therefore beneficial to study interventions promoting honest behavior. We implemented a novel intervention that gave participants a choice to promise to be truthful or not to promise. To measure cheating behavior, we developed a novel variant of the mind game—the dice‐box...
Article
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This initiative examined systematically the extent to which a large set of archival research findings generalizes across contexts. We repeated the key analyses for 29 original strategic management effects in the same context (direct reproduction) as well as in 52 novel time periods and geographies; 45% of the reproductions returned results matching...
Article
People sometimes choose to remain ignorant, even when information comes at low marginal costs and promises high utility. To investigate whether older adults enlist deliberate ignorance more than younger adults, potentially as an emotion-regulation tool, we presented a representative sample of 1,910 residents of Germany with 13 scenarios in which kn...
Article
Full-text available
How can we maximize what is learned from a replication study? In the creative destruction approach to replication, the original hypothesis is compared not only to the null hypothesis, but also to predictions derived from multiple alternative theoretical accounts of the phenomenon. To this end, new populations and measures are included in the design...
Article
Full-text available
How can we maximize what is learned from a replication study? In the creative destruction approach to replication, the original hypothesis is compared not only to the null hypothesis, but also to predictions derived from multiple alternative theoretical accounts of the phenomenon. To this end, new populations and measures are included in the design...
Article
How can we maximize what is learned from a replication study? In the creative destruction approach to replication, the original hypothesis is compared not only to the null hypothesis, but also to predictions derived from multiple alternative theoretical accounts of the phenomenon. To this end, new populations and measures are included in the design...
Article
Full-text available
Drawing on the concept of a gale of creative destruction in a capitalistic economy, we argue that initiatives to assess the robustness of findings in the organizational literature should aim to simultaneously test competing ideas operating in the same theoretical space. In other words, replication efforts should seek not just to support or question...
Article
Background: The desire to have children has been declining globally, especially in industrialized nations. This study examines the physical health correlates, and positive and negative mental health correlates of the wish to have a child across time and in two countries. Method: Questionnaire data were obtained from large-scale university sample...
Conference Paper
Fast-and-frugal trees for classification/decision are at the intersection of three families of models: lexicographic, linear and tree-based. We briefly examine the classification performance of simple models when making inferences out of sample, in 11 medical data sets in terms of Receiver Operating Characteristics diagrams and predictive accuracy....
Article
Full-text available
Some issues that have been settled by the scientific community, such as evolution, the effectiveness of vaccinations, and the role of CO2 emissions in climate change, continue to be rejected by segments of the public. This rejection is typically driven by people's worldviews, and to date most research has found that conservatives are uniformly more...
Preprint
Some issues that have been settled by the scientific community, such as evolution, the effectiveness of vaccinations, and the role of CO2 emissions in climate change, continue to be rejected by segments of the public. This rejection is typically driven by people's worldviews, and to date most research has found that conservatives are uniformly more...
Conference Paper
Fast-and-frugal trees for classification/decision are at the intersection of three families of models: lexicographic, linear and tree-based. We briefly examine the classification performance of simple models when making inferences out of sample, in 11 medical data sets in terms of Receiver Operating Characteristics diagrams and predictive accuracy....
Article
Full-text available
Studying personal identity, the continuity and sameness of persons across lifetimes, is notoriously difficult and competing conceptualizations exist within philosophy and psychology. Personal reidentification, linking persons between points in time is a fundamental step in allocating merit and blame and assigning rights and privileges. Based on Noz...
Article
Full-text available
To what extent are research results influenced by subjective decisions that scientists make as they design studies? Fifteen research teams independently designed studies to answer five original research questions related to moral judgments, negotiations, and implicit cognition. Participants from two separate large samples (total N > 15,000) were th...
Article
Full-text available
Participants from public participant panels, such as Amazon Mechanical Turk, are shared across many labs and participate in many studies during their panel tenure. Here, I demonstrate direct and indirect downstream consequences of frequent exposure in three studies (N1−3 = 3, 660), focusing on the cognitive reflection test (CRT), one of the most fr...
Article
Promises are crucial for human cooperation because they allow people to enter into voluntary commitments about future behavior. Here we present a novel, fully incentivized paradigm to measure voluntary and costly promise-keeping in the absence of external sanctions. We found across three studies ( N = 4,453) that the majority of participants (61%–9...
Article
Full-text available
Analyses of the evolution of cooperation often rely on two simplifying assumptions: (i) individuals interact equally frequently with all social network members and (ii) they accurately remember each partner's past cooperation or defection. Here, we examine how more realistic, skewed patterns of contact-in which individuals interact primarily with o...
Article
Competitive escalation occurs frequently in managerial environments, when decisions create sunk costs and decision makers compete under time pressure. In a series of experiments using a minimal dollar auction paradigm, we test interventions to prevent competitive escalation. Without any intervention, most people, including experienced managers, esc...
Article
Analyses of the evolution of cooperation often rely on two simplifying assumptions: (i) individuals interact equally frequently with all social network members and (ii) they accurately remember each partner's past cooperation or defection. Here, we examine how more realistic, skewed patterns of contact—in which individuals interact primarily with o...
Article
Full-text available
This article relates natural frequency representations of cue-criterion relationships to fast-and-frugal heuristics for inferences based on multiple cues. In the conceptual part of this work, three approaches to classification are compared to one another: The first uses a natural Bayesian classification scheme, based on profile memorization and nat...
Article
A few years ago, the world experienced the most severe economic crisis since the Great Depression. According to the depression baby hypothesis, people who live through such macroeconomic shocks take less financial risk in their future lives (e.g., lower stock market participation). This hypothesis has previously been tested against survey data. Her...
Article
Full-text available
Recently, Krupenye, Rosati & Hare (KRH henceforth) reported that bonobos and chimpanzees show ‘human-like framing effects’ in a food choice task [[1][1]]. Chimpanzees and bonobos could choose between a ‘framed’ option of fruit and an alternative option of peanuts (matched in expected value
Article
To the Editor In her editorial1 published in JAMA Psychiatry, Dr Kraemer gives important insights into using covariates, thereby adding to her large body of highly valuable publications.Notably, she also stated, “Tests that are not statistically significant should be regarded as indicative of poorly justified, designed, or executed hypothesis-testi...
Article
Competing with others has costs and benefits, but it becomes solely destructive and spiteful, when everyone’s situation is worsened. We demonstrate that destructive competition can be observed in situations, where goals are fully compatible. By manipulating the format of feedback, we link the occurrence of destructive competition to the availabilit...
Article
Escalation of commitment, the tendency to increase one’s investment in a losing course of action even after negative feedback is well known for its adverse consequences. In this paper, we investigate a situation in which escalation of commitment occurs in the context of competitive settings. Based on Shubik’s (1971) original game, we introduce a ‘m...
Article
Objective: To investigate diagnostic accuracy in patient histories involving nonspecific complaints and the extent to which characteristics of physicians and structural properties of patient histories are associated with accuracy. Methods: Six histories of patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with nonspecific complaints were prov...
Article
Inferences are often based on uncertain cues, and the accuracy of such inferences depends on the order in which the cues are searched. Previous experimental and theoretical research has shown that individuals progress only slowly in learning of cue orderings through feedback. A clue to how people (as opposed to computers) solve this problem is soci...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Estimating quantities is an important everyday task. We analyzed the performance of various estimation strategies in ninety-nine real-world environments drawn from various domains. In an extensive simulation study, we compared two classes of strategies: one included machine learning algorithms such as general regression neural networks and classifi...
Article
Full-text available
When faced with a choice, people can normally select no option, i.e., defer choice. Previous research has investigated when and why individuals defer choice, but has almost never looked at these questions when groups of people make choices. Separate reasons predict that groups may be equally likely, more likely, or less likely than individuals to d...
Article
Full-text available
In categorization tasks where resources such as time, information, and computation are limited, there is pressure to be accurate, and stakes are high–as when deciding if a patient is under high risk of having a disease or if a worker should undergo retraining–, it has been proposed that people use, or should use, simple adaptive heuristics. We intr...
Thesis
Full-text available
Hierarchische Regellisten für binäre Klassifikationen auf der Basis von Testprofilen werden durch drei unterschiedliche Klassen von Heuristiken konstruiert: durch einen gierigen Algorithmus aus dem Data Mining, durch genetische Algorithmen und Schwarmalgorithmen aus dem Bereich des Künstlichen Lebens und zuletzt durch ein Verfahren, das eine Brücke...
Article
Full-text available
In the present study we introduce a sensitive video-based test for the evaluation of subtle mindreading difficulties: the Movie for the Assessment of Social Cognition (MASC). This new mindreading tool involves watching a short film and answering questions referring to the actors' mental states. A group of adults with Asperger syndrome (n = 19) and...

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