Jan-Niklas Runge

Jan-Niklas Runge
University of Strasbourg | UNISTRA · Génétique Moléculaire, Génomique, Microbiologie (GMGM)

Doctor of Philosophy

About

12
Publications
827
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74
Citations
Introduction
In my PhD, I am studying the evolution of a selfish genetic element in house mice, the t haplotype. I am using a range of methods to do so, including the analysis of long-term study data, behavioural experiments, simulations, and genomics.

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
Meiotic drivers are selfish genetic elements that manipulate meiosis to increase their transmission to the next generation to the detriment of the rest of the genome. One example is the t haplotype in house mice, which is a naturally occurring meiotic driver with deleterious traits—poor fitness in polyandrous matings and homozygote inviability or i...
Article
Full-text available
Genealogical relationships are fundamental components of genetic studies. However, it is often challenging to infer correct and complete pedigrees even when genome‐wide information is available. For example, inbreeding can obscure genetic differences between individuals, making it difficult to even distinguish first‐degree relatives such as parent‐...
Preprint
Full-text available
Genealogical relationships are fundamental components of genetic studies. However, it is often challenging to infer correct and complete pedigrees even when genome-wide information is available. For example, inbreeding can obfuscate genetic differences between individuals, making it difficult to even distinguish first-degree relatives such as paren...
Article
Full-text available
Meiotic drivers are genetic entities that increase their own probability of being transmitted to offspring, usually to the detriment of the rest of the organism, thus ‘selfishly’ increasing their fitness. In many meiotic drive systems, driver-carrying males are less successful in sperm competition, which occurs when females mate with multiple males...
Preprint
Full-text available
Meiotic drivers are selfish genetic elements that manipulate meiosis to increase their transmission to the next generation to the detriment of the rest of the genome. The t haplotype in house mice is a naturally occurring meiotic driver with deleterious traits - poor fitness in polyandrous matings and homozygote inviability or infertility - that pr...
Article
Meiotic drivers are selfish genetic elements that manipulate meiosis to increase their transmission to the next generation to the detriment of the rest of the genome. The t haplotype in house mice is a naturally occurring meiotic driver with deleterious traits—poor fitness in polyandrous matings and homozygote inviability or infertility—that preven...
Article
Full-text available
Scientists are rapidly developing synthetic gene drive elements intended for release into natural populations. These are intended to control or eradicate disease vectors and pests, or to spread useful traits through wild populations for disease control or conservation purposes. However, a crucial problem for gene drives is the evolution of resistan...
Thesis
The organism and its genome are a remarkable cooperative achievement of billions of DNA bases that work together. Natural selection has shaped the genome into cooperation by generally favoring those genomes that work well as a whole, rather than resembling collections of genes that do not produce anything greater than the sum of their parts. But wh...
Article
Full-text available
Endocrine data from wild populations provide important insight into social systems. However, obtaining samples for traditional methods involves capture and restraint of animals, and/or pain, which can influence the animal’s stress level, and thereby undesirable release of hormones. Here, we measured corticosterone, testosterone and progesterone in...
Article
Life is built on cooperation between genes, which makes it vulnerable to parasitism. Selfish genetic elements that exploit this cooperation can achieve large fitness gains by increasing their transmission relative to the rest of the genome. This leads to counter-adaptations that generate unique selection pressures on the selfish genetic element. Th...
Preprint
Full-text available
Life is built on cooperation between genes, which makes it vulnerable to parasitism. However, selfish genetic elements that exploit this cooperation can achieve large fitness gains by increasing their transmission unfairly relative to the rest of the genome. This leads to counter-adaptations that generate unique selection pressures on the selfish g...
Preprint
Life is built on cooperation between genes, which makes it vulnerable to parasitism. However, selfish genetic elements that exploit this cooperation can achieve large fitness gains by increasing their transmission unfairly relative to the rest of the genome. This leads to counter-adaptations that generate unique selection pressures on the selfish g...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
I am currently researching the evolution of a selfish genetic element in house mice, the t haplotype. The chromosome that carries this element is transmitted to the next generation more often than usual (> 50%). At the same time, it has negative fitness effects on the mouse that carries it: the sperm is less mobile and carrying the element on both chromosomes is lethal (such a mouse will not be born). Therefore, the fitness of this element is very limited under some circumstances and very high under others. Furthermore, this element is rather old (two million years), present around the globe, and spans half a chromosome in size. This makes for a fascinating study system for evolutionary questions: What traits were selected in the element? How did it survive for so long? What genes are affected and how do they differ from "normal" mice?