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Jan Laurens Geffert

Jan Laurens Geffert

Doctor of Philosophy

About

19
Publications
25,877
Reads
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501
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2012 - present
University of Cambridge
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2011 - April 2012
United Nations Environment Programme - World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC)
Position
  • Intern
Description
  • CITES, FLEGT, EU comission, wildlife trade, sustainable use, biological database management
August 2009 - September 2009
State Office for Nature, Environment, and Consumers Rights of North Rhine Westphalia (LANUV NRW)
Position
  • Intern
Education
September 2012
University of Cambridge
Field of study
  • Geography
October 2004 - June 2011
University of Bonn
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
In 2008, a group of conservation scientists compiled a list of 100 priority questions for the conservation of the world's biodiversity [Sutherland et al. (2009) Conservation Biology, 23, 557–567]. However, now almost a decade later, no one has yet published a study gauging how much progress has been made in addressing these 100 high‐priority questi...
Article
Full-text available
Achieving the United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) results in many ecological, social, and economic consequences that are inter-related. Understanding relationships between sustainability goals and determining their interactions can help prioritize effective and efficient policy options. This paper presents a framework that integ...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Achieving ocean sustainability is paramount for coastal communi es and marine industries, yet is also inextricably linked to much broader global sustainable development—including increased resilience to climate change and improved social equity—as envisioned by the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. This report highlights the co-bene ts fr...
Article
The impact of Pleistocene climate changes substantially varied between tropical regions, resulting in striking differences in angiosperm species richness caused by post-glacial recolonization delays. Tropical bryophytes, which have been perceived as extremely good dispersers due to biased rates of monoecy and hence spore production, differ striking...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The availability and appropriate use of marine and coastal data form the foundation of effective decision-making. This manual, as the second edition of the manual published by Martin et al. in 2014, aims to provide an overview of global marine and coastal datasets of biodiversity importance. The intention is to address the fragmented information an...
Article
Full-text available
Marine industries face a number of risks that necessitate careful analysis prior to making decisions on the siting of operations and facilities. An important emerging regulatory framework on environmental sustainability for business operations is the International Finance Corporation’s Performance Standard 6 (IFC PS6). Within PS6, identification of...
Article
Full-text available
The Cactaceae with c. 1,435 species are the most important plant family of the arid regions of the Americas. Recent revisions and molecular studies resulted in an improved knowledge of the phylogeny and taxonomy of this group. Due to their high value as ornamental plants, countless publications with data on ecological preferences and geographic occ...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Knowledge of marine and coastal datasets tends to be fragmented and/or difficult to access for the non-expert or ad hoc data user. To address this lack of information, this document provides an overview of global marine and coastal datasets of biodiversity importance, and also includes some datasets of regional interest. This non-exhaustive review...
Article
Full-text available
We have analysed the global patterns of moss species diversity based on a dataset created from checklists, online databases, and herbarium records. We collected more than 100 000 distribution records for over 400 different geographical units and standardized species taxonomy using the TROPICOS database of the Missouri Botanical Garden. Maps of over...
Article
Full-text available
We analysed documented moss species numbers on a global scale with the aim to identify regions or countries with possibly under-documented moss floras. European units (countries, administrative units) in general have much higher documented species numbers than extra-European units with similar area sizes. Especially South American and African units...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
http://www.nereusprogram.org/ Who we are: The Nereus Program is a global interdisciplinary initiative created to further our knowledge of how best to attain sustainability for the world’s oceans. The Nereus Program, a collaboration between the Nippon Foundation and the University of British Columbia, has engaged in innovative, interdisciplinary ocean research since its inception in 2011. The Program is currently a global partnership of six leading marine science institutes with the aim of undertaking research that advances our comprehensive understandings of the global ocean systems across the natural and social sciences, from oceanography and marine ecology to fisheries economics and impacts on coastal communities. What we do: The Program is built around three core objectives: Research: conducting collaborative ocean research across the natural and social sciences Capacity building: developing a network of experts that can engage in discussion of complex and multifaceted questions of ocean sustainability Public outreach: transferring these ideas to practical solutions in global policy forums and public engagement Mission Statement: The Nereus Program strives to explore a broad range of perspectives and scientific opinions on ocean sustainability, and to create an inclusive community of researchers and other marine professionals. This principle is founded on the Nippon Foundation’s vision of global capacity building to ensure that our oceans’ legacy is preserved and potential is protected for future generations.