Jan Eglinger

Jan Eglinger
Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research | FMI · Facility for Advanced Imaging and Microscopy

PhD

About

35
Publications
7,243
Reads
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1,310
Citations
Introduction
Jan Eglinger currently works as a Bio-Image Analyst at the Facility for Advanced Imaging and Microscopy, Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research.
Additional affiliations
January 2009 - February 2015
Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2005 - May 2010
January 2005 - September 2005
National Institute for Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Amagasaki, Osaka, Japan
Position
  • Master's Student
Education
October 2005 - July 2010
October 2002 - September 2005
October 2000 - September 2002
University of Freiburg
Field of study
  • Chemistry

Publications

Publications (35)
Preprint
Full-text available
Physical proximity between genomic sequences in mammalian chromosomes controls key biological processes such as transcriptional regulation and DNA repair. Yet it is currently unknown if chromosomal contacts are rare and stable or instead frequent and dynamic, and how they depend on the loop extrusion activity of cohesin or barriers such as CTCF. By...
Article
Cellular stress leads to reprogramming of mRNA translation and formation of stress granules (SGs), membraneless organelles consisting of mRNA and RNA-binding proteins. Although the function of SGs remains largely unknown, it is widely assumed they contain exclusively non-translating mRNA. Here, we re-examine this hypothesis using single-molecule im...
Article
Full-text available
Gene expression oscillators can structure biological events temporally and spatially. Different biological functions benefit from distinct oscillator properties. Thus, finite developmental processes rely on oscillators that start and stop at specific times, a poorly understood behavior. Here, we have characterized a massive gene expression oscillat...
Preprint
Full-text available
Cellular stress leads to reprogramming of mRNA translation and formation of stress granules (SGs), membrane-less organelles consisting of mRNA and RNA-binding proteins. Although the function of SGs remains largely unknown, it is widely assumed they contain exclusively non-translating mRNA. Here we re-examine this hypothesis using single-molecule im...
Article
Full-text available
Open-source software tools are often used for the analysis of scientific image data due to their flexibility and transparency in dealing with rapidly evolving imaging technologies. The complex nature of image analysis problems frequently requires many tools to be used in conjunction, including image processing and analysis, data processing, machine...
Preprint
Full-text available
Gene expression oscillators drive various repetitive biological processes. The architecture and properties of an oscillatory system can be inferred from the way it transitions, or bifurcates, between active (oscillatory) and quiescent (stable) states. Here, we have characterized the behavior of a developmental gene expression oscillator in C. elega...
Chapter
mRNA turnover plays an important role in the regulation of post-transcriptional gene expression. While many protein factors involved in mRNA degradation have been identified, we still lack a basic understanding of the principles that regulate the spatiotemporal dynamics of mRNA turnover within single cells. To overcome this limitation, we have deve...
Article
Full-text available
Forums and email lists play a major role in assisting scientists in using software. Previously, each open-source bioimaging software package had its own distinct forum or email list. Although each provided access to experts from various software teams, this fragmentation resulted in many scientists not knowing where to begin with their projects. Th...
Article
RNA degradation ensures appropriate levels of mRNA transcripts within cells and eliminates aberrant RNAs. Detailed studies of RNA degradation dynamics have been heretofore infeasible because of the inherent instability of degradation intermediates due to the high processivity of the enzymes involved. To visualize decay intermediates and to characte...
Article
Full-text available
Liquid–liquid phase separation (LLPS) of proteins containing intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) has been proposed as a mechanism underlying the formation of membrane-less organelles. Tight regulation of IDR behavior is essential to ensure that LLPS only takes place when necessary. Here, we report that IDR acetylation/deacetylation regulates LL...
Chapter
Quantitative fluorescence microscopy techniques are frequently applied to answer fundamental biological questions. Single-molecule RNA imaging methods have enabled the direct observation of the initial steps of the mRNA life cycle in living cells, however, the dynamic mechanisms that regulate mRNA translation are still poorly understood. We have de...
Article
Full-text available
It is well established that mRNAs encoding secretory or membrane-bound proteins are translated on the surface of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The extent to which mRNAs that encode cytosolic proteins associate with the ER, however, remains controversial. To address this question, we quantified the number of cytosolic protein-encoding mRNAs that c...
Article
RNA degradation plays a fundamental role in regulating gene expression. In order to characterize the spatiotemporal dynamics of RNA turnover in single cells, we developed a fluorescent biosensor based on dual-color, single-molecule RNA imaging that allows intact transcripts to be distinguished from stabilized degradation intermediates. Using this m...
Article
Full-text available
Background Pericytes, surrounding the endothelium, fulfill diverse functions that are crucial for vascular homeostasis. The loss of pericytes is associated with pathologies, such as diabetic retinopathy and Alzheimer’s disease. Thus, there exists a need for an experimental system that combines pharmacologic manipulation and quantification of peric...
Article
Full-text available
Nucleosomes are essential for proper chromatin organization and the maintenance of genome integrity. Histones are post-translationally modified and often evicted at sites of DNA breaks, facilitating the recruitment of repair factors. Whether such chromatin changes are localized or genome-wide is debated. Here we show that cellular levels of histone...
Article
The Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 (MRX) complex is related to SMC complexes that form rings capable of holding two distinct DNA strands together. MRX functions at stalled replication forks and double-strand breaks (DSBs). A mutation in the N-terminal OB fold of the 70 kDa subunit of yeast replication protein A, rfa1-t11, abrogates MRX recruitment to both types...
Article
Full-text available
A hallmark feature of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus is the progressive dysfunction and loss of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells, and inflammatory cytokines are known to trigger beta cell death. Here we asked whether the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 encoded by the Parkinson's disease gene PARK7 protects islet cells from cytokine- and strep...
Article
In the nervous system, NMDA receptors (NMDARs) participate in neurotransmission and modulate the viability of neurons. In contrast, little is known about the role of NMDARs in pancreatic islets and the insulin-secreting beta cells whose functional impairment contributes to diabetes mellitus. Here we found that inhibition of NMDARs in mouse and huma...
Article
Full-text available
Elderly patients often suffer from multiple age-related diseases. Here we show that the expression of DJ-1, an antioxidant protein with reduced expression in the central nervous system of patients with Parkinson's disease, is reduced in pancreatic islets of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In contrast, under non-diabetic conditions, D...
Article
Blood vessels function in the uptake, transport, and delivery of gases and nutrients within the body. A key question is how the central lumen of blood vessels develops within a cord of vascular endothelial cells. Here, we demonstrate that sialic acids of apical glycoproteins localize to apposing endothelial cell surfaces and generate repelling elec...
Article
In vertebrates, endothelial cells (ECs) form blood vessels in every tissue. Here, we investigated vascular lumen formation in the developing aorta, the first and largest arterial blood vessel in all vertebrates. Comprehensive imaging, pharmacological manipulation, and genetic approaches reveal that, in mouse embryos, the aortic lumen develops extra...
Chapter
Endothelial cells are equipped with the intrinsic ability to form tubes and sprouts with a central lumen. However, the mechanisms that allow endothelial cells to form a lumen are largely unknown. We would like to discuss critically current models of vascular lumen formation and point to many unexplored and open questions. We briefly present what va...
Article
Endothelial cells are equipped with the intrinsic ability to form tubes and sprouts with a central lumen. However, the mechanisms that allow endothelial cells to form a lumen are largely unknown. We would like to discuss critically current models of vascular lumen formation and point to many unexplored and open questions. We briefly present what va...