Jan Stanisław Boratyński

Jan Stanisław Boratyński
Polish Academy of Sciences | PAN · Mammal Research Institute

PhD Biology

About

23
Publications
5,635
Reads
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144
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2019 - present
Polish Academy of Sciences
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
March 2018 - September 2019
Polish Academy of Sciences
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2012 - December 2017
Nicolaus Copernicus University
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
September 2012 - December 2017
Nicolaus Copernicus University
Field of study
  • Environmental Physiology
September 2005 - July 2010
Poznań University of Life Sciences
Field of study
  • Behavioural Ecology

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
We examined the ecology of bat assemblages in the commercially used stands of the Białowieża Forest, Poland. The species composition was analyzed, as well as the relationship between bat activity and distance to buildings and to open waters. The relationship between bat activity and stand age, type of stand (coniferous vs. deciduous), and tree cano...
Article
Full-text available
Small mammals that are specialists in homeothermic thermoregulation reduce their self-maintenance costs of normothermy to survive the winter. By contrast, heterothermic ones that are considered generalists in thermoregulation can lower energy expenditure by entering torpor. It is well known that different species vary the use of their strategies to...
Poster
Full-text available
As other heterothermic mammals, the edible dormice spend the majority of their life inactive. Hibernation shorten the active season and reduce mortality risk via predator avoidance. On the other hand, hibernation is associated with gonadal atrophy and thus negatively affects reproduction. That is why the end of hibernation and an earlier emergence...
Poster
Full-text available
Passive implanted transponders (PIT-tags) are currently widely use in identification of individuals in animal studies and have successfully replaced most of old-time marking methods. The advantage of this technique is an automatic registration of animal’s presence and storage of collected data. However, main limitation of the automatic systems is h...
Conference Paper
Heldmaier’s seasonal acclimatization model predicts that, given their high relative level of energy expenditure, small non-hibernating mammals focus on energy conservation for as long as winter conditions prove unfavorable. They achive a lowering of energy requirements by winter-time reduction of body size/mass, and thus of the basal metabolic rate...
Article
Full-text available
Theoretical modelling predicts that the thermoregulatory strategies of endothermic animals range from those represented by thermal generalists to those characteristic for thermal specialists. While the generalists tolerate wide variations in body temperature (Tb), the specialists maintain Tb at a more constant level. The model has gained support fr...
Article
Full-text available
The evolution of endothermic thermoregulation is rooted in the processes involving high metabolism, which allows the maintenance of high and stable body temperatures (Tb ). In turn, selection for high endothermic metabolism correlates with increased sizes of metabolically active organs, and thus with high basal metabolic rate (BMR). Endothermic ani...
Article
Full-text available
In many mammalian species, variation in body temperature (Tb) exceeds the values suitable for defining homeothermy, making it justifiable and even necessary to resort to the term heterothermic. However, Tb data are only available for ca. 1% of extant mammalian species. We investigated variations in Tb in wild free-living and experimentally food-dep...
Article
Full-text available
The duration of melatonin (MEL) secretion conveys information about day length and initiates a cascade of seasonal phenotypic adjustments in photoresponsive mammals. With shortening days, animals cease reproduction, minimize energy expenditure, enhance thermoregulatory capacity and adjust functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis...
Article
Full-text available
According to theoretical predictions endothermic homeotherms can be classified as either thermal specialists and thermal generalists. In high cost environments thermal specialists are supposed to be more prone to use facultative heterothermy than generalists. We tested this hypothesis on the intraspecific level using laboratory male mice (C57BL/cmd...
Article
Full-text available
Basal metabolic rate (BMR) correlates with the cost of life in endothermic animals. It usually differs consistently among individuals in a population, but it may be adjusted in response to predictable or unpredictable changes in the environment. The phenotypic flexibility of BMR is considered an adaptation to living in a stochastic environment; how...
Article
Full-text available
Dotychczas na terenie Pogórza Przemyskiego stwierdzono 13 gatunków nietoperzy, głównie w ob-rębie Twierdzy Przemyśl i jej bliskich okolicach. W latach 1996-2017 prowadzono badania mające na celu poszerzenie stanu wiedzy o faunie nietoperzy tego regionu. Latem wyszukiwano poten-cjalne kryjówki kolonii rozrodczych, zimą kontrolowano miejsca hibernacj...
Article
Full-text available
As photoperiod shortens with the approach of winter, small mammals should reduce their energy expenditure to survive periods of food limitation. However, within seasons, animals should balance their energy budgets as abiotic conditions change, sometimes unpredictably; cold spells should increase heat production, while warm spells should do the oppo...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we presented new data about the pond bat (Myotis dasycneme) hibernating in the kujawsko-pomorskie voivodeship (53°30’N, 18°45’E). We found five individuals of this species hibernating in Citadel of Grudziądz. This is the first record of living, hibernating individuals of pond bats in that location. This is also the second hibernation...
Article
Full-text available
During monthly bat surveys carried out in winters of 2008/2009 and 2009/2010 we studied clustering behavior of greater mouse-eared bats (Myotis myotis) hibernating in the Międzyrzecz Fortified Front (MFF) in western Poland. Since the behavior of hibernating bats is usually affected by varying environmental conditions we measured changes in the ambi...
Article
Full-text available
The paper presents the results of winter bats' censuses in standalone bunkers of Międzyrzecki Fortified Front (MFF) not connected with the Central Part (CS) of underground system of corridors and stations in western Poland. During the years 2005-2012 47 objects were controlled. At least 12 bats’ species (3536 determined individuals) hibernated in s...
Article
Full-text available
A male Brandt’s bat Myotis brandtii was caught in ”Mierzeja Wiślana” Landscape Park in the eastern part of Polish Balic Sea Coast. This, a sexually non-active, more than one year old bat, was mist-netted on the forest crossroad near the Skowronki village (54°21’N, 19°16’E, WGS84) on 30 July 2012. This is the third loca- lity of this species at Poli...
Article
Full-text available
Bats often hibernate in composed of many individuals, homo or hete-ro-specific, groups. We observed clusters of bats in the undergrounds of the Central Section of the Międzyrzecz Fortified Front (MFF). Observations were carried out once a month from October to March during the two winter seasons of 2008/2009 and 2009/2010 years. In total, 13 inspec...
Article
Full-text available
An individual behaviour of the Nyctalus noctula was observed during escape from a predator - Strix aluco. This behaviour consisted in loss of predator by the air maneuvers. Then, bat “hid in the predator shadow” by flew close behind him and waited out until owl gives up hunting. The bat flew away safely when the predator ceased searching the lost v...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
It is widely believed that most of the endothermic animals, i.e. those that produce heat as a byproduct of metabolic processes, are warm-blooded thus maintain high and constant body temperature (Tb). In reality many mammals and birds are heterothermic, and are able to temporarily reduce metabolic rate and Tb. Thanks to this strategy, they are able to reduce negative consequences of unfavorable environmental conditions, such as food shortage or low temperatures. Even within a single population of the yellow-necked mouse Apodemus flavicollis there are present a “warm-blooded” and a “cold-blooded” individuals, or those that cannot be assigned to any of these categories as they show an intermediate strategy. Thus the variability of thermoregulatory strategies can be treated as a continuous trait, reaching from the individuals always maintaining high and stable body temperature (thermal specialists) to the individuals periodically operating at lower Tb (thermal generalists). The model assumes that generalists are able to function in a larger Tb range, but when they are in the thermal optimum (i.e. in the conditions when the body is functioning the best), their performance is generally lower than specialists which operate on narrower Tb range. Specialists are able to process energy faster, which can be beneficial, e.g. during reproduction, but they need continuous energy supplies. Generalists are able to save energy, but do not process it as efficiently as specialists. This suggests that both strategies base on maximizing other fitness components - reproduction or survival. In consequence, it leads to the evolution of extremely different life-histories. Investment in rapid and intensive reproduction is associated with greater mortality and shorter life-span, whereas investment in survival strategies can delay reproduction, but is leading to the evolution of longevity. Therefore, we hypothesize that the existence of specialists and generalists in terms of thermoregulation within a single population is maintained by the evolutionary compromise between survival and reproduction. The high variability of thermoregulation strategies persistent in the mouse population is most likely related to the unpredictable food resource and weather conditions. After years characterized by a high seed production, the population of yellow-necked mice increases, while when the amount of food is limited, it drastically decreases. Thus it seems, that variable selection pressure on the ability to save energy under limited resources and investments into reproduction in years when food is available, determines the fitness of individuals using different life-history strategies. Since the frequency and intensity of deciduous tree seed fall is predicted to change as a result of global warming, our research would contribute to a better understanding of the future changes in the populations of wild animals, and therefore in the entire forest ecosystems.
Archived project
Endothermic animals are able to maintain a constant body temperature (Tb). However, many of them also show intraindividual variability of Tb. It is suggested that this variability may be an adaptation to living in a variable environment. It was also suggested that intraindividual variation in Tb affects energy expenditure and therefore affects survival of homeothermic animals when costs of obtaining food increase or when its availability and the energy payoffs are greatly reduced. Therefore, this trait would affect fitness and would be adaptive in evolutionary sense. To the best of our knowledge this hypotheses have not been tested experimentally. To increase the fitness the trait must provide benefits for individuals. Evolutionary adaptations result from natural selection, which is a deterministic process acting only on genetically determined traits. Therefore, the main objective of the project is to answer the questions whether a reduction of Tb in fasted animals reduces their energy expenditure, and whether Tb and its variability observed in fasted homeothermic animals is heritable? To answer these questions we will verify two hypotheses. The first is that the intraindividual variability of Tb in response to food deprivation correlates with changes in metabolic rate and affects energy expenditure of an individual. The intraindividual variability of Tb is most likely be a result of natural selection acting on control mechanisms of heat production and heat loss and this is why we hypothesize that the intraindividual variability of Tb observed in response to food deprivation is a genetically determined trait. To test these hypotheses will experimentally verify the following predictions: 1) lowering of Tb which occurs in homeothermic animal in response to food deprivation is correlated with decreased metabolic rate, and the return to normothermy is preceded by an increase in metabolic rate 2) the intraindividual variability of homeothermic animal Tb in response to fast is a heritable trait.