Jamieson C Gorrell

Jamieson C Gorrell
Vancouver Island University | VIU · Department of Biology

PhD

About

50
Publications
9,221
Reads
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1,042
Citations
Introduction
Jamie currently works in the Biology Department at Vancouver Island University where he trains students in behavioural and molecular ecology.
Additional affiliations
July 2016 - April 2020
Vancouver Island University
Position
  • Professor
September 2015 - August 2016
University of New England
Position
  • Research Associate
September 2013 - August 2015
University of Alberta
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
January 2007 - August 2013
University of Alberta
Field of study
  • Ecology
September 2004 - December 2006
Laurentian University
Field of study
  • Biology
September 2000 - April 2004
Wilfrid Laurier University
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (50)
Article
Full-text available
Orchids often have specific pollinators, which should provide reproductive isolation, yet many produce natural hybrids. Platanthera dilatata and P. stricta differ in floral morphology but often co-occur, overlap in flowering, and are reputed parents of P. x estesii . We used motion-triggered video detection units to monitor floral visitors of P. di...
Article
Full-text available
Captive breeding is often a last resort management option in the conservation of endangered species which can in turn lead to increased risk of inbreeding depression and loss of genetic diversity. Thus, recording breeding events via studbook for the purpose of estimating relatedness, and facilitating mating pair selection to minimize inbreeding, is...
Article
Full-text available
The wolverine (Gulo gulo) is a Holarctic species found in North America primarily across the boreal forest, the subarctic, and along the Pacific coast, including Vancouver Island (VI), British Columbia. While wolverines on VI are rare and possibly extirpated, they have been previously described as a unique subspecies, G. g. vancouverensis, distinct...
Article
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The pace-of-life syndrome hypothesis posits that personality traits (i.e. consistent individual differences in behaviour) are linked to life history and fitness. Specifically, fast-paced individuals are predicted to be proactive (i.e. active and aggressive) with an earlier age at first reproduction, a shorter life span and higher fecundity than slo...
Article
Full-text available
Populations delineated based on genetic data are commonly used for wildlife conservation and management. Many studies use the program structure, combined with the ΔK method to identify the most probable number of populations (K). We recently found K = 2 was identified more often when studies used ΔK compared to studies that did not. We suggested tw...
Article
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The Canadian Rocky Mountains are one of the few places on Earth where the spatial genetic structure of wide-ranging species have been relatively unaffected by anthropogenic disturbance. We characterised the spatial genetic structure of Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis (Shaw, 1804)) in the northern portion of their range. Usi...
Preprint
Full-text available
The pace of life syndrome hypothesis posits that personality traits (i.e., consistent individual differences in behaviour) are linked to life history and fitness. Specifically, fast-paced individuals are predicted to be proactive (i.e., active and aggressive) with an earlier age at first reproduction, a shorter lifespan, and a higher fecundity than...
Article
Organisms can affect one another's phenotypes when they socially interact. Indirect genetic effects occur when an individual's phenotype is affected by genes expressed in another individual. These heritable effects can enhance or reduce adaptive potential, thereby accelerating or reversing evolutionary change. Quantifying these social effects is th...
Article
Full-text available
The widespread occurrence of alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) highlights the diverse ways in which sexual selection can operate within a population. We studied ARTs in Columbian ground squirrels (Urocitellus columbianus), evaluating paternity, lifetime reproductive success, and life histories. Reproductively mature male Columbian ground squi...
Article
Full-text available
Cooperative breeding is a breeding system in which offspring receive care not only from their parents but also from other conspecific helpers. This helping behavior could potentially be costly to attendants; however, one of the means by which helpers can override these costs is through preferentially directing aid towards kin. Helping patterns migh...
Preprint
Full-text available
Organisms can affect one another's phenotypes when they socially interact. Indirect genetic effects occur when an individual's phenotype is affected by genes expressed in another individual. These heritable effects can enhance or reduce adaptive potential, thereby accelerating or reversing evolutionary change. Quantifying these social effects is th...
Article
Full-text available
https://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/143645/1/ecy2158-sup-0002-AppendixS2.pdf
Article
Full-text available
Garry oak (Quercus garryana Douglas ex Hook.) is a deciduous tree whose ecosystem is listed “at risk” throughout its range in British Columbia (BC), Canada, under the Canadian Species at Risk Act. Garry oak ecosystems host the most diverse flora for coastal BC, yet they account for less than 0.3% of the province’s land coverage. Due to the loss and...
Article
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In many socially monogamous bird species, both sexes regularly engage in mating outside their pair bond. Although the benefits of extra-pair (EP) mating behavior are clear and well established for males, such as an increase in the number of sired offspring, the benefits of EP mating behavior to females are less clear. A dominant theory for the inci...
Article
Full-text available
Background Our understanding of gut microbiota has been limited primarily to findings from human and laboratory animals, but what shapes the gut microbiota in nature remains largely unknown. To fill this gap, we conducted a comprehensive study of gut microbiota of a well-studied North American red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) population. Red...
Article
Full-text available
Interactions with conspecifics are an important aspect of an individual's environment. Although it is well known that the presence of conspecifics can have important effects on behaviour, in general it is also now acknowledged that the composition of the social environment can vary, and that this variation may have profound effects on individual be...
Article
Full-text available
The objectives of this study were to describe and evaluate potential drivers of genetic structure in Canadian breeding populations of the Ovenbird, Seiurus aurocapilla. We performed genetic analyses on feather samples of individuals from six study sites using nuclear microsatellites. We also assessed species identity and population genetic structur...
Article
Full-text available
Assessments of population genetic structure have become an increasing focus as they can provide valuable insight into patterns of migration and gene flow. STRUCTURE, the most highly cited of several clustering-based methods, was developed to provide robust estimates without the need for populations to be determined a priori. STRUCTURE introduces th...
Article
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Kin recognition can facilitate kin selection and may have played a role in the evolution of sociality. Red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) defend territories using vocalizations known as rattles. They use rattles to discriminate kin, though the mechanism underlying this ability is unknown. Our objective was to distinguish between the mechanisms...
Article
Full-text available
The origins of feral cats in Australia may be understood with the help of molecular studies, but it is important that hypotheses be tested with appropriate sampling and methodology. We point out several shortcomings in the analysis by Koch et al. (BMC Evol Biol 15:262, 2015; A voyage to Terra Australis: human-mediated dispersal of cats. Dryad Digit...
Article
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An understanding of mating systems and fine-scale spatial genetic structure is required to effectively manage forest pest species such as Dendroctonus ponderosae (mountain pine beetle). Here we used genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms to assess the fine-scale genetic structure and mating system of D. ponderosae collected from a single stand...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to discriminate among individuals, or among classes of individuals, can provide animals with important fitness benefits. Although several mechanisms for discrimination are possible, most require animals to show stable phenotypic variation that reflects their identity or their membership in a particular class (e.g. sex, mate, kin). For t...
Article
Full-text available
Genetic variation in fitness is required for the adaptive evolution of any trait but natural selection is thought to erode genetic variance in fitness. This paradox has motivated the search for mechanisms that might maintain a population's adaptive potential. Mothers make many contributions to the attributes of their developing offspring and these...
Article
Full-text available
Most empirical attempts to explain the evolution of parental care have focused on its costs and benefits (i.e., fitness consequences). In contrast, few investigations have been made of the other necessary prerequisite for evolutionary change, inheritance. Here, we examine the fitness consequences and heritability (h(2) ) of a post-weaning parental...
Article
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1. Energy expenditure is a trait of central importance in ecological and evolutionary theory. We examined the correlates of, the strength of selection on, and the heritability of, daily energy expenditure (DEE; kJ/day) during lactation in free-ranging North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus).2. Over seven years, lactating squirrels wi...
Article
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A trait must genetically correlate with fitness in order to evolve in response to natural selection, but theory suggests that strong directional selection should erode additive genetic variance in fitness and limit future evolutionary potential. Balancing selection has been proposed as a mechanism that could maintain genetic variance if fitness com...
Article
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Communal nesting can help defray the high cost of endothermic heat production in cold environments, but such social behavior is generally thought to be incompatible with the persistent defense of exclusive territories in typically ‘asocial’ animals. We examined the propensity for communal nesting in female red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), w...
Article
Full-text available
We determined the sequence of the male-specific minor histocompatibility complex antigen (Smcy) from the Y chromosome of seven squirrel species (Sciuridae, Rodentia). Based on conserved regions inside the Smcy intron sequence, we designed PCR primers for sex determination in these species that can be co-amplified with nuclear loci as controls. PCR...
Article
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Consistent individual differences in behaviour, and behavioural correlations within and across contexts, are referred to as animal personalities. These patterns of variation have been identified in many animal taxa and are likely to have important ecological and evolutionary consequences. Despite their importance, genetic and environmental sources...
Article
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Parasites can negatively affect their host’s physiology and morphology and render host individuals less attractive as mating partners. The energetic requirements of defending against parasites have to be traded off against other needs such as feeding activity, territoriality, thermoregulation or reproduction. Parasites can affect mating patterns, w...
Article
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Extrinsic factors such as physical barriers play an important role in shaping population genetic structure. A reduction in gene flow leading to population structuring may ultimately lead to population divergence. These divergent populations are often considered subspecies. Because genetic differentiation may represent differences between subspecies...
Article
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The tendency of females to mate with multiple males is often explained by direct and indirect benefits that could outweigh the many potential costs of multiple mating. However, behaviour can only evolve in response to costs and benefits if there is sufficient genetic variation on which selection can act. We followed 108 mating chases of 85 North Am...
Article
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In polyandrous and polygynandrous species where females mate with multiple partners, males are expected to maximize their fitness by exhibiting an array of reproductive behaviors to ensure fertilization success, such as competing for the best mating order within a mating sequence, optimizing their investment in copulation, and mate guarding. Though...
Article
Full-text available
Orphaned animals benefit from being adopted, but it is unclear why an adopting parent should incur the costs of rearing extra young. Such altruistic parental behaviour could be favoured if it is directed towards kin and the inclusive benefits of adoption exceed the costs. Here, we report the occurrence of adoption (five occurrences among 2,230 litt...
Article
Full-text available
Multiple mating by females is common in many mammalian species, often resulting in mixed paternity litters. In such mating systems, mating order, male age, and male body mass frequently play an important role in determining male reproductive success. We tested for these effects on male reproductive success in Columbian ground squirrels (Urocitellus...
Article
Full-text available
Parasites use their hosts for nutrition, shelter, and even dispersal; the latter can result in sex-biased parasite distribution. Host sex-biased parasitism has been well documented in vertebrates, including mammals, and males are often more parasitized than females. Male-biased parasitism is often attributed to sexual size dimorphism, with larger a...

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Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
A meta-analysis/review/opinion on the prevalence of delta K use and potential biases in reporting K=2.