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Jamieson Atkinson

Jamieson Atkinson
British Columbia Conservation Foundation · Vancouver Island Fisheries Office

Bachelor of Science in Fisheries

About

13
Publications
4,016
Reads
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2
Citations
Citations since 2016
11 Research Items
2 Citations
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Introduction
Jamieson is a Fisheries Biologist/Ecologist with a decade of experience working on fisheries conservation, restoration, and research projects on Vancouver Island and Haida Gwaii. Jamieson has a multifaceted portfolio, ranging from riverine and estuarine habitat restoration, stock assessment, and fisheries and ecology-based research projects. One of his primary interests is conducting life history investigations by combining PIT tag technology and otolith microchemistry.

Publications

Publications (13)
Technical Report
Full-text available
In 2016, the British Columbia Conservation Foundation received a grant to fully fund an investigation into Comox Lake cutthroat trout life history characteristics via otolith microchemistry. This project collaborated with the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development. The microchemical analysis of multiple ele...
Technical Report
Full-text available
In the past, the estuary of Cowichan Bay provided a rich environment with habitat for a diverse array of species that were used and depended upon by generations of Cowichan Tribes members. These included estuarine plants, waterfowl, various fish species, crustaceans, bivalves, and marine mammals (seals). Today, the harvest of the vast majority of t...
Presentation
Full-text available
Historically, estuaries were utilized by the Coast Salish people as key foraging locations, and Nations’ principal villages were often constructed along the estuaries in their traditional territories. However, industrial activities such as log booming in estuaries throughout the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries have caused severe, irreparable harm to...
Article
An array of predators that consume juvenile salmon (Oncorhynchus spp. Suckley‎, 1861)‎ may account for the poor returns of adult salmon to the Salish Sea. However, the Pacific great blue heron (Ardea herodias fannini Chapman, 1901) is rarely listed among the known salmon predators, despite being regularly seen near salmon streams. Investigating her...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Executive Summary Declines in Chinook Salmon returns to rivers of the Salish Sea have been observed for decades. A multitude of factors have been linked to these trends. Of particular note, increasing Harbour Seal abundance in the Salish Sea appears to coincide with declines, and modelling exercises suggest that in some hotspots like the Salish Sea...
Technical Report
Full-text available
In 2015 the British Columbia Ministry of Forests, Lands, and Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development contracted the British Columbia Conservation Foundation to initiate a preliminary study of the maternal origin of rainbow trout/steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fry from the Cowichan River, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, using otolith...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This study aims to provide information on fork length size at marine emergence for Cowichan River Chinook during different hydrological regimes and their subsequent contribution to the adult spawning population. This report documents the first phase of the study, which examined the 2014 outmigration year. The 2014 outmigration year was in the 90th...
Technical Report
Full-text available
During 2017, the effect of predation on juvenile Chinook survival during their downstream migration was investigated using a combination of PIT tags and trail cameras. Tag detection antennas were used to target their potential predators with the goal of detecting tags (fish) in their digestive tract. Predator species and numbers were documented usi...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Sproat Lake Adfluvial Piscivorous Cutthroat Trout Stock Assessment: Via Experimental Method Horizontal Limnetic Gillnets Prepared for: Brendan Anderson, RPBio Fisheries Section, West Coast Region B.C. Ministry of Forests Lands and Natural Resources 2080-A Labieux Rd, Nanaimo, BC, V9T 6J9 Prepared By: Jamieson Atkinson, B.Sc WFC Fisheries Biologi...
Research
Full-text available
In late winter, 2014, the British Columbia Conservation Foundation (BCCF) was requested by AVEA in Port Alberni to design and implement a second year study of juvenile Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) monitoring in inter-tidal reaches of the Somass River and Estuary. A year earlier (spring, 2013), BCCF conducted initial field monitoring u...
Research
Full-text available
During the summer of 2014 BCCF, completed the Grilse Creek LWD rehabilitation Project. As a result 18 LWD structures were built along with two riffle enhancements using large boulders. Work was completed using excavators working instream during low flow conditions to place logs and ballast rock, a three man crew followed and cabled structures to se...

Questions

Questions (4)
Question
I'm looking at determining the age at which juvenile Chinook Salmon enter the estuary/marine environment using strontium levels. Do we need to get samples of both adults and juveniles in order to get a more accurate and precise timing of entry? Or can this be done with only using adult otoliths?  
Question
Since estuaries are influenced by marine and freshwater, what are the consequences of highly varying pH on the organisms that live in these environments? Shellfish, salmon, barnacles, anemones etc?
Question
Coho have large sail like dorsal fins as well as sickle shaped anal fins. Adult coho do not have these traits, does this change occur during smoltification or throughout the long ocean migration?

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Our goals for this study are to: (a) develop the monitoring and evaluation framework and infrastructure to determine survival bottlenecks for wild and hatchery Chinook, Coho and steelhead, (b) implement infrastructure to allow for adaptive management of hatchery programs for harvest, conservation, and sustainability objectives, and (c) conduct research, monitoring, and evaluation that will help guide management to improve the performance of hatchery and wild stocks.