Jamie C Weir

Jamie C Weir
The University of Edinburgh | UoE · Institute of Evolutionary Biology

BSc Hons (Edin), FLS, MemRES
PhD student at the University of Edinburgh

About

26
Publications
1,945
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Citations
Introduction
I am an entomologist and evolutionary biologist interested in all aspects of the ecology and evolution of Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths). My research spans taxonomy, systematics, behavioural ecology, predator-prey interactions, cognition, and animal psychology. More recently, I'm investigating the synchronised phenology of caterpillars and their host-plants, what role this plays in their survival and the persistence of their populations, and how this might be affected by climate change.

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
We present a genome assembly from an individual female Maniola jurtina (the meadow brown; Arthropoda; Insecta; Lepidoptera; Nymphalidae). The genome sequence is 402 megabases in span. The complete assembly is scaffolded into 30 chromosomal pseudomolecules, with the W and Z sex chromosome assembled. Gene annotation of this assembly on Ensembl has id...
Chapter
Full-text available
Understanding the mechanisms which actively maintain phenotypic variation in natural populations is an important consideration in evolutionary biology. Many cryptic prey species which rely upon avoiding visual detection by predators are also highly polymorphic, seemingly contradicting our expectation that selection would drive such a population tow...
Article
Climate warming has caused the seasonal timing of many components of ecological food chains to advance. In the context of trophic interactions, the match–mismatch hypothesis postulates that differential shifts can lead to phenological asynchrony with negative impacts for consumers. However, at present there has been no consistent analysis of the li...
Preprint
Climate warming has caused the seasonal timing of many components of ecological food chains to advance (Thackeray et al. 2010, 2016). In the context of trophic interactions the match-mismatch hypothesis (MMH) postulates that differential shifts can lead to phenological asynchrony with negative impacts for consumers (Cushing 1990). However, it is st...
Article
Full-text available
Phenotypic polymorphism in cryptic species is widespread. This may evolve in response to search image use by predators exerting negative frequency‐dependent selection on intraspecific colour morphs, “apostatic selection”. Evidence exists to indicate search image formation by predators and apostatic selection operating on wild prey populations, thou...
Research
Full-text available
This report describes the carabid beetles recorded across a three week period of pitfall trapping at the Woodland Trust property of Glen Finglas, West Perthshire (VC87), in September and October 2012. Traps were set in transects through five different habitats: a grassland, oak woodland, birch woodland, heathland, and a stream-side. In total, 64 sp...
Thesis
Paradoxically, many species which rely upon crypsis to avoid predation also display considerable colour polymorphism. It has been argued that this has evolved in response to the use of "searching images" by foraging predators. Searching images result from a predator encountering a prey item and undergoing a process of learning, recalling the appear...
Article
Full-text available
A small series of temperature experiments conducted on Argynnis aglaja pupae are described. Specimens were exposed to warm (~25oC), cold (~5oC) and alternating warm and cold temperatures. Pupal mortality rates under each temperature treatment are given, and the colouration of the resulting imagines is described and figured. It is tentatively conclu...
Article
Full-text available
The validity of naming and describing intraspecific taxa, and the subsequent grouping of such named entities into distinct taxonomic categories, is briefly considered and evaluated. The intraspecific taxonomic categories of aberration, variety, form, race and sub-species are defined and examples given as to their usage. The naming of unique mutants...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
To understand the factors underlying the evolution of polymorphism in Lepidopteran wing-colour patterns. Specifically, in those species which possess a large number of distinct (or superficially distinct) morphs.
Project
This project aims to sort, record, and identify all specimens of Lepidoptera in the University's Natural History Collections. They will then be reorganised systematically into a single reference collection. The Lepidoptera will be organised into a British collection (including species which occur within the British Isles) and collection of the remaining foreign species. Particular emphasis is being placed on the former, which comprise the bulk of the material.
Project
We are interested in the relationship between climate (spring temperature), and the timing (phenology) of key events that comprise a woodland food web, from tree to caterpillar to blue tit. Since 2014 we have been conducting fieldwork on a 200 km transect running northward from Edinburgh and which is composed of 44 sites of varying habitat. This spatial replication allows us to examine whether insights obtained in oak woodlands generalise to other habitats. The major questions we are trying to address are: 1) How does the timing of egg-laying in relation and the availability of caterpillars impact on the ability of blue tits to fledge their young? 2) Does mismatch between the peak availability fo caterpillars and the peak demands of blue tit nestlings vary depending on the dominant tree species? 3) By how much does the blue tit optimum lay date change with spring temperature?