Jamie Nicole Tedeschi

Jamie Nicole Tedeschi
Australian Bureau of Statistics | ABS · Data Strategy Integration & Services Division

BSc.(Hons) | PhD Molecular Ecology and Quantitative Genetics
Data Engineer for the Australian Bureau of Statistics | Honorary Research Fellow in Synthetic Biology at UWA

About

36
Publications
6,382
Reads
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304
Citations
Introduction
Jamie is a Data Engineer on the BLADE project for the Australian Bureau of Statistics. As a Data Engineer she integrates 'big data' datasets from different source systems, runs quality assurance checks, performs preliminary analyses, and converts the data into a user-friendly format for easy access and analysis by academics, researchers, government organisations, and policy makers. Jamie also holds an Honorary Research position in synthetic biology/biological engineering in the Fritz lab at UWA.
Additional affiliations
July 2020 - December 2022
University of Western Australia
Position
  • Fellow
Description
  • Within the Fritz Synthetic Biology Lab I am working to develop a microbial platform for bio-degradation of PET plastics. I am also a casual/sessional lecturer and demonstrator for multiple schools within the Faculty of Science at UWA.
September 2019 - December 2019
Biologic Environmental Survey PTY LTD
Position
  • Senior Geneticist (Casual)
October 2018 - June 2019
The University of Queensland
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Investigating potential mechanisms of early embryonic death syndrome (EEDS) and hatching emergence of green turtles on Raine Island (e.g. high nest density, warm conditions, dry conditions, microbial diversity and concentration)
Education
July 2020 - December 2020
University of Western Australia
Field of study
  • Graduate Certificate in Bioinformatics
November 2019 - November 2020
University of Western Australia
Field of study
  • Graduate Certificate in Tertiary Teaching
February 2011 - February 2015
University of Western Australia
Field of study
  • PhD Molecular Ecology and Quantitative Genetics

Publications

Publications (36)
Article
Full-text available
Oviparous reptile embryos are expected to breach their critical thermal maxima if temperatures reach those predicted under current climate change models due to the lack the maternal buffering processes and parental care. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are integral in the molecular response to thermal stress, and their expression is heritable, but the r...
Article
Full-text available
The capacity of species to respond adaptively to warming temperatures will be key to their survival in the Anthropocene. The embryos of egg-laying species such as sea turtles have limited behavioural means for avoiding high nest temperatures, and responses at the physiological level may be critical to coping with predicted global temperature increa...
Article
Full-text available
The survival and viability of sea turtle embryos is dependent upon favourable nest temperatures throughout the incubation period. Consequently, future generations of sea turtles may be at risk from increasing nest temperatures due to climate change, but little is known about how embryos respond to heat stress. Heat shock genes are likely to be impo...
Article
Full-text available
Female sea turtles are promiscuous, with clutches of eggs often sired by multiple males and rates of multiple paternity varying greatly within and across species. We investigated levels of multiple paternity in loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) from three rookeries in Western Australia by analysing polymorphic species-specific genetic marker...
Preprint
Full-text available
Vibrio natriegens is known as the world's fastest growing organism with a doubling time of less than 10 minutes. This incredible growth speed empowers V. natriegens as a chassis for synthetic and molecular biology, potentially replacing E. coli in many applications. While first genetic parts have been built and tested for V. natriegens , a comprehe...
Article
Egg inviability at oviposition is a possible explanation for the high rate of early-stage embryo death of eggs laid by green turtles at Raine Island, the largest green turtle nesting aggregation in the world. We tested this possibility by assessing egg viability of freshly laid eggs. We found that green turtle eggs laid at Raine Island have high vi...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how climate change impacts species and ecosystems is integral to conservation. When studying impacts of climate change, warming temperatures are a research focus, with much less attention given to extreme weather events and their impacts. Here, we show how localized, extreme rainfall events can have a major impact on a species that is...
Article
Full-text available
Because the sex of all sea turtle hatchlings is determined by incubation temperature, with low temperatures producing mainly males and high temperatures producing mainly females, sea turtle populations worldwide are threatened by feminization of hatchlings due to increases in global temperature. Data obtained by laparoscopic sexing of immature indi...
Article
Full-text available
The ghost bat (Macroderma gigas) is endemic to Australia but is under threat, with scarce information available on the genetic health of remaining populations. Here, we develop molecular assays for microsatellite genotyping and molecular sexing of non-invasive samples as a genetic monitoring tool to identify individuals, measure genetic diversity a...
Article
Full-text available
Mammal sex allocation research has focused almost exclusively on maternal traits, but it is now apparent that fathers can also influence offspring sex ratios. Parents that produce female offspring under conditions of intense male–male competition can benefit with greater assurance of maximized grand-parentage. Adaptive adjustment in the sperm sex r...
Article
Full-text available
Different stages during development are important when it comes to phenotypic adjustments in response to external stimuli. Critical stages in mammals are the prenatal phase, where embryos are exposed to a milieu of sex steroid hormones, and the early‐postnatal phase, where littermates interact and experience their incipient social environment. Furt...
Article
Full-text available
Landscape topography and the mobility of individuals will have fundamental impacts on a species’ population structure, for example by enhancing or reducing gene flow and therefore influencing the effective size and genetic diversity of the population. However, social organisation will also influence population genetic structure. For example, specie...
Technical Report
Unpublished interim report on the Raine Island Recovery Project Nest Environment Study 2018-2019
Article
Full-text available
Chronic consumption of acetaminophen (APAP) during exercise training leads to a reduction in tendon stiffness and modulus compared with a placebo. We explored whether this effect could be due to a reduction in tendon collagen content or cross-linking. Ten-week-old male Wistar rats (n = 50) were divided into placebo or APAP groups and into sedentary...
Article
Full-text available
Exercise is recommended for the treatment of type 2 diabetes because of its benefits on body weight and glycemic control. Our recent work using the db/db mouse, a model that mimics the phenotype of type 2 diabetes, demonstrated that forced treadmill training exerted detriment- tal effects on obesity, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. We investi...
Conference Paper
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of acetaminophen (APAP) on collagen content in rat Achilles tendon. Ten-week-old male Wistar rats were given saline (SAL, n=8) or APAP (n=10; 200 mg·kg−1) once daily via oral gavage for 8 weeks. Tendon collagen content was determined by detection of the collagen specific amino acid hydroxyprol...
Conference Paper
Endurance training alters the oxidative capacity of tissues to favor the oxidation of fatty acids. In response to training, carnitine concentrations in plasma are increased suggesting that either carnitine biosynthesis is stimulated or renal uptake of carnitine from the urine is enhanced, or both. Carnitine is essential in the oxidation of fatty ac...
Article
Full-text available
This report describes the synthesis of analogues of 4-[1-(3,5,5,8,8-pentamethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-2-naphthyl)ethynyl]benzoic acid (1), commonly known as bexarotene, and their analysis in acting as retinoid X receptor (RXR)-specific agonists. Compound 1 has FDA approval to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL); however, its use can cause side effe...

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Projects

Projects (6)
Project
The Raine Island Recovery Project is a six year, $8.505m collaboration between BHP, the Queensland Government, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), Wuthathi and Meriam Nation (Ugar, Mer, Erub) Traditional Owners and the Great Barrier Reef Foundation (GBRF) to protect and restore the island’s critical habitat to ensure the future of key marine species, including green turtles and seabirds. On ground delivery of the Project is coordinated by the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) as part of the Great Barrier Reef Field Management Program (FMP).
Project
Unravelling the genetic and population structure of Ghost bats (Macroderma gigas) in the Pilbara region of Western Australia