Jamie Snook

Jamie Snook
Torngat Wildlife, Plants and Fisheries Secretariat

Doctor of Philosophy

About

23
Publications
5,189
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
73
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2009 - present
Torngat Secretariat
Torngat Secretariat
Position
  • Managing Director

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
Across Inuit Nunangat, Inuit rely on wildlife for food security, cultural continuity, intergenerational learning, and livelihoods. Caribou has been an essential species for Inuit for millennia, providing food, clothing, significant cultural practices, and knowledge-sharing. Current declines in many caribou populations—often coupled with hunting mor...
Chapter
Full-text available
A network of Indigenous co-management organizations is alive and robust within the management of fisheries in Canada and, subsequently, forms an important part of Arctic marine governance. This chapter examines Indigenous co-management in the Labrador Inuit Settlement Region of Nunatsiavut, Labrador through a case study of the Labrador Inuit Land C...
Article
Commercial fishing supports coastal communities around the world and fishing livelihoods are often interwoven into local societies, including culture, identity, knowledges, and economies, particularly for many Indigenous Peoples globally. Through a case study with co-management board members in Nunatsiavut, Labrador, Canada, we explore how access t...
Article
Many Rangifer tarandus (caribou or reindeer) populations across North America have been declining, posing a variety of challenges for Indigenous communities that depend on the species for physical and cultural sustenance. This article used a scoping review methodology to systematically examine and characterize the nature, extent, and range of artic...
Article
For many Indigenous Peoples in the Circumpolar North, cultural engagement and continuity across generations is directly related to relationships between and among people, animals, and landscapes. However, minimal research outlines the emotional responses and disruptions to culture and identity that are driven by ecological change, and the subsequen...
Chapter
Full-text available
During COVID-19 I was given the opportunity to live in my home community, Deninu K'ue, for six months, something I haven't done since leaving home for university. During this time I was able An RSC Collection of Stories 2 to reconnect with my family, both human and non-human, and was reminded of what's important to me and what I'm working towards....
Technical Report
Full-text available
In February 2020, a stratified random block aerial survey and classification of the southern half of Moose Management Area (MMA) 91 (Kaipokok) was conducted. The entire MMA was stratified into high- and low-density or non-habitat using land cover and landform data in conjunction with previously documented Inuit knowledge. The resulting stratificati...
Poster
Full-text available
This infographic visually displays the results of the aerial survey and classification of Moose Management Area 91-South (Kaipokok) in Nunatsiavut, Labrador, which took place in February 2020.
Poster
Full-text available
This infographic visually displays the results of the aerial survey and classification of Moose Management Area 91-South (Kaipokok) in Nunatsiavut, Labrador, which took place in February 2020.
Technical Report
Full-text available
Moose are a relatively new resident to Labrador after expanding their range from adjacent Quebec beginning in the 1950’s. Since this time, moose have been seen increasingly farther north, and Inuit Knowledge indicates that moose densities began to increase in Nunatsiavut, Labrador within the past few decades. With the precipitous decline and subseq...
Technical Report
Full-text available
A second aerial survey was performed in March and April 2017 with close collaboration of all partners of the Torngat Committee interested in the conservation of Torngat caribou. This report summarizes technical and biological information gathered during the Torngat Herd aerial survey. The distance sampling method estimated Torngat Herd size in 2017...
Chapter
Full-text available
Poster
Full-text available
Inuit of Nunavik and Nunatsiavut have long known that a small caribou population was living year-round in the Torngat Mountains. Amidst concerns about a possible decline and changing patterns of distribution, Inuit knowledge-holders and a co-management technical committee united seven organizations from two provinces, six governments, two parks, an...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Inuit of Nunavik and Nunatsiavut have known for decades that a small caribou population was living year-round in the Torngat Mountains region. It was their “local” caribou as opposed to the migratory caribou belonging to the George River herd that visited the Torngat Mountains for part of the year. Few scientific studies have been completed on Torn...
Thesis
The Labrador Inuit Land Claim Agreement was signed in December 2005, making it the first modern treaty in Atlantic Canada. The comprehensive land claim agreement was the first in Canada that funded two co-management boards on a tripartite basis. This action research project involved semi-directed interviews with past and present board members of th...
Thesis
This paper will take a historical look at the Combined Councils of Northern Labrador and its evolution into the Combined Councils of Labrador; but in doing so will attempt to illustrate a shift in economic focus. Prior to 1972 outside interest placed an emphasis on significant economic developments and after Labrador organized a much higher emphasi...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Estimate abundance of moose in Nunatsiavut, Labrador.