Jamie L Rhudy

Jamie L Rhudy
University of Tulsa · Department of Psychology

PhD

About

244
Publications
42,637
Reads
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5,411
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2015 - December 2015
University of Tulsa
Position
  • Professor (Full)
August 2009 - December 2015
University of Tulsa
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
August 2002 - August 2003
University of Mississippi Medical Center
Position
  • Instructor

Publications

Publications (244)
Article
Background: Native Americans (NAs) are more likely to experience chronic pain than non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs); however, the proximate causes predisposing NAs to chronic pain remain elusive. Likely due to centuries of adversity, discrimination, and marginalization, NAs report greater psychological stress than NHWs, which may place them at risk for...
Article
Native Americans (NAs) experience higher rates of chronic pain than the general U.S. population and we have recently shown that pain-free NAs are ∼3x more likely than non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs) to prospectively develop chronic pain. Moreover, this pain disparity is partially mediated by stress-related factors (discrimination, psychological stress,...
Article
Chronic pain affects one-fifth of U.S. adults and causes considerable physical, psychological, and economic burden. The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated these hardships and disproportionately impacted individuals with pre-existing health conditions like chronic pain. For the present study, follow-up surveys were administered every 6-months to pain-fre...
Article
Chronic pain is a tremendous burden, resulting in increased psychological distress and disability. To prevent and address chronic pain before it develops, more research into chronic pain risk markers is needed. Cerebral peak alpha frequency (PAF) is a promising risk marker as it is associated with pain sensitivity, postsurgical pain outcomes, and s...
Article
Heart rate variability (HRV) is a physiological measure of beat-to-beat variation in time between heartbeats that reflects competing influences of the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Research suggests that both ANS branches, and consequently, HRV, are regulated by the central autonomic network (CAN),...
Article
Poor sleep quality is often comorbid with chronic pain. Research has also shown that poor and disrupted sleep may increase risk for chronic pain by promoting pronociceptive processes. This could occur through disrupted emotional modulation of pain since poor sleep can impact emotional experience and emotional experience modulates pain and nocicepti...
Article
Full-text available
Native Americans (NAs) are at increased risk for chronic pain. One mechanism contributing to this pain disparity could be personal pain beliefs, which may influence actual pain sensitivity. Thus, we examined whether self-evaluated pain sensitivity (SEPS) mediates the relationship between ethnicity [NAs vs. non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs)] and objectivel...
Article
Objectives: Native Americans (NAs) have the highest prevalence of chronic pain of any racial/ethnic group. This issue has received little attention from the scientific community. One factor that may contribute to racial pain disparities is pain catastrophizing. Pain catastrophizing is a construct related to negative pain outcomes in persons with/w...
Article
Native Americans (NAs) have higher pain rates than the general U.S. population. It has been found that increased central sensitization and reduced pain inhibition are pronociceptive processes that increase pain risk; yet, little attention has focused on the influence of psychosocial factors. Discrimination is a psychosocial factor associated with i...
Chapter
Adverse life events (ALEs) are major life stressors that can occur throughout the lifespan and pose a significant physical or psychological threat to safety and/or security. Research suggests there is a link between ALE exposure and the development of chronic pain. Mechanistic animal and human studies indicate that stressors can have a long-lasting...
Article
The nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR) is a spinally mediated withdrawal response and is used as an electrophysiological marker of descending modulation of spinal nociception. Chemical and pharmacological modulation of nociceptive neurotransmission at the spinal level has been evidenced by direct effects of neurotransmitters and pharmacological agent...
Article
Chronic pain results in considerable suffering, as well as significant economic and societal costs. Prior evidence suggests that Native Americans (NAs) have higher rates of chronic pain than other U.S. racial/ethnic groups, but the mechanisms contributing to this pain disparity are poorly understood. The Oklahoma Study of Native American Pain Risk...
Article
Objectives Compared to other racial/ethnic groups, Native Americans (NAs) are more likely to develop health conditions associated with allostatic load (stress-related wear-and-tear). Psychosocial factors (i.e., adverse life events, discrimination, psychological distress) often promote stress and may help explain greater allostatic load in NAs. More...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The nociceptive flexion reflex is a physiological, polysynaptic reflex and refers to the level that an appropriate withdrawal response activates when a painful stimulus is detected. The nociceptive flexion reflex threshold (NFRthr) is defined as the lowest noxious stimulation intensity required to trigger a reflex motor response. Despi...
Article
Native Americans (NAs) experience higher rates of chronic pain than the general U.S. population, but the risk factors for this pain disparity are unknown. NAs also experience high rates of stressors and cardiovascular and metabolic health disparities (eg, diabetes, cardiovascular disease) consistent with allostatic load (stress-related wear-and-tea...
Article
Adverse life events (ALEs) are a risk factor for chronic pain; however, mechanisms underlying this association are not understood. This study examined whether cumulative ALE exposure impairs endogenous inhibition of pain (assessed from pain report) and spinal nociception (assessed from nociceptive flexion reflex; NFR) in healthy, pain-free Native A...
Article
Native Americans (NAs) experience higher rates of chronic pain. To examine the mechanisms for this pain inequity, we have previously shown that NAs report higher levels of pain-related anxiety and pain catastrophizing, which are in turn related to pronociceptive (pain-promoting) processes. But, it is currently unclear why NAs would report greater p...
Article
Emotion has a strong modulatory effect on pain perception and spinal nociception. Pleasure inhibits pain and nociception, whereas displeasure facilitates pain and nociception. Dysregulation of this system has been implicated in development and maintenance of chronic pain. The current study sought to examine whether emotional modulation of pain coul...
Article
Threat-induced pain modulation can increase survival by amplifying physiological and behavioral reactions towards danger. Threat can also modulate spinal nociception, suggesting engagement of endogenous top-down circuitry. A unique method to assess spinal nociception is via reflex receptive fields (RRF) associated with the nociceptive withdrawal re...
Article
Full-text available
Several studies have recently suggested that an abnormal processing of respiratory interoceptive and nociceptive (painful) stimuli may contribute to eating disorder (ED) pathophysiology. Mood and anxiety disorders (MA) are also characterized by abnormal respiratory symptoms, and show substantial comorbidity with ED. However, no studies have examine...
Preprint
Research into the neurobiological and psychosocial mechanisms involved in fibromyalgia (FM) has progressed remarkably in recent years. Despite this, current accounts of FM fail to capture the complex, dynamic and mutual crosstalk between neurophysiological and psychosocial domains. We conducted a comprehensive review of the existing literature in o...
Article
The most widely accepted definition of pain considers it a sensory and emotional experience associated with potential or actual physical harm. However, research tends to generalize findings from predominantly European American samples thereby assuming universality across cultures. Because of the high prevalence of pain within the AI group, it is im...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Native Americans (NAs) have a higher prevalence of chronic pain than other US racial/ethnic groups, but the mechanisms contributing to this pain disparity are under-researched. Pain catastrophizing is one of the most important psychosocial predictors of negative pain outcomes, and the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) has been establi...
Article
Background Conditioned pain modulation (CPM) is a task that involves measuring pain in response to a test stimulus before and during a painful conditioning stimulus (CS). The CS pain typically inhibits pain elicited by the test stimulus; thus, this task is used to assess endogenous pain inhibition. Moreover, less efficient CPM-related inhibition is...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Evidence suggests Native Americans (NAs) experience higher rates of chronic pain than the general US population, but the mechanisms contributing to this disparity are poorly understood. Recently, we conducted a study of healthy, pain-free NAs (n = 155), and non-Hispanic whites (NHWs, n = 150) to address this issue and found little ev...
Article
This study examined whether a modified version of biofeedback (ie, Conditioned Biofeedback) that incorporated placebo analgesia-like manipulations could promote antinociception in healthy, pain-free participants. During Conditioned Biofeedback (n = 28), sympathetic arousal level was displayed visually and participants were asked to reduce it while...
Article
Native Americans (NAs) have a higher prevalence of chronic pain than other U.S. racial/ethnic groups, but there have been few attempts to understand the mechanisms of this pain disparity. This study used a comprehensive battery of laboratory tasks to assess peripheral fiber function (cool/warm detection thresholds), pain sensitivity (eg, thresholds...
Poster
Affective valence modulates spinal (nociceptive flexion reflex; NFR), supraspinal (N2 pain-evoked potential), and perceptual markers of pain. Specifically, viewing pleasant pictures decreases spinal nociception, supraspinal nociception, and pain, whereas viewing unpleasant pictures increases them. To date, no single study has measured all 3 outcome...
Article
Objective: This study investigated whether a brief psychotherapy for post-trauma nightmares (exposure, relaxation, and rescripting therapy [ERRT]), reduced suicidal ideation (SI). We hypothesized that: (a) nightmare frequency and severity, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and sleep quality would be related to SI at pretreatment;...
Article
Background The tendency to inhibit anger (anger-in) is associated with increased pain. This relationship may be explained by the negative affectivity hypothesis (anger-in increases negative affect that increases pain). Alternatively, it may be explained by the cognitive resource hypothesis (inhibiting anger limits attentional resources for pain mod...
Article
The tendency to inhibit anger (anger-in) is associated with increased pain. This relationship may be explained by the negative affectivity hypothesis such that those with high anger-in experience increased negative affectivity and thus increased pain (because negative affect enhances pain). Alternatively, this relationship may be explained by the c...
Article
Trauma exposure, especially sexual assault (SA), is highly correlated with pain conditions, in that many chronic pain samples report trauma histories. However, our understanding of the mechanisms behind this relationship is limited. Previous findings from our lab suggest that SA disrupts descending pain modulation. However, to date, no study has us...
Article
Previous research has explored cultural differences concerning the prevalence, response, and treatment preferences of individuals experiencing pain. However, the meaning of these painful experiences has not been comprehensively examined. Research tends to generalize findings from predominantly European American samples and assume universality of th...
Article
Compared to other racial/ethnic minority groups, Native Americans (NAs) are more likely to report experiences of discrimination and also have the highest prevalence of pain conditions. Thus, there is a need to understand how and why these disproportionately high rates occur. Discrimination has been conceptualized within the biopsychosocial model as...
Article
Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a form of noninvasive brain stimulation that can either enhance (via anodal stimulation) or depress (via cathodal stimulation) neural excitability in focal areas of the cortex through application of a low-intensity direct current. Although prior studies indicate that cortical application of tDCS is...
Article
Chronic pain results in tremendous economic and psychological burden. Thus, an ability to identify individuals at risk for chronic pain onset could be an important first step in reducing this burden. One mechanism that may contribute to pain onset is impaired descending pain inhibition. The present study examined whether the efficiency of descendin...
Article
Identification of those at risk for chronic pain development may help prevent its onset. The relationship between blood pressure (BP) and pain processing has been studied extensively, but it is unknown whether BP is related to future pain onset. The current study examined whether resting BP predicts the development of chronic pain in participants f...
Article
Chronic pain leads to considerable suffering and disability. Epidemiological evidence suggests that Native Americans (NA) suffer from chronic pain at higher rates than any other U.S. racial/ethnic group. However, to our knowledge, no study has examined this issue prospectively to examine whether healthy, pain-free NAs are more likely to develop chr...
Article
Adverse life experiences (ALEs) are associated with hyperalgesia and chronic pain, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. One potential mechanism is hyperexcitability of spinal neurons (ie, central sensitization). Given that Native Americans (NAs) are more likely to have ALEs and to have a higher prevalence of chronic pain, the relati...
Article
Native Americans (NAs) have a higher prevalence of chronic pain than any other U.S. racial/ethnic group; however, little is known about the mechanisms for this pain disparity. This study used quantitative sensory testing to assess pain experience in healthy, pain-free adults (n = 137 NAs (87 female), n = 145 non-Hispanic whites (NHW; 68 female)) af...
Article
Sexual assault (SA) is associated with an increased risk of chronic pain, but the mechanisms for this relationship are poorly understood. To explore whether disrupted descending inhibition is involved, this study used a conditioned pain modulation task to study the inhibition of pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR; a correlate of spinal no...
Article
Objective: To assess conditioned pain modulation efficiency in persons with and without migraine headaches. Design: Cross-sectional assessment of experimental pain. Setting: University campus and surrounding community in a large Midwestern US city. Subjects: Twenty-three adults with and 32 without a history of migraine headaches participated...
Article
Negative affect is considered an important factor in the etiology of depression and anxiety, and is highly related to pain. However, negative affect is not a unitary construct. To identify specific targets for treatment development, we aimed to derive latent variables of negative affect and test their unique contributions to affective processing du...
Article
Full-text available
Interoception refers to the process by which the nervous system senses, interprets, and integrates signals originating from within the body, providing a moment-by-moment mapping of the body’s internal landscape across conscious and unconscious levels. Interoceptive signaling has been considered a component process of reflexes, urges, feelings, driv...
Article
Previous research on an efficacious cognitive-behavioral treatment for posttrauma nightmares and sleep disturbances (exposure, relaxation, and rescripting therapy; ERRT) has not tested the treatment in individuals with bipolar disorder. However, research suggests that individuals diagnosed with bipolar disorder are at increased risk for trauma expo...
Article
Expectations for pain relief and experience/conditioning are psychological factors that contribute to placebo analgesia, yet few studies have studied the physiological mechanisms underlying their effects. This study randomized 133 participants to 4 groups: an expectation only (E-only) group, a conditioning only (C-only) group, an expectation plus c...
Article
Objective: Sexual assault (SA) is associated with an increased risk for chronic pain and affective distress. Given that emotional processes modulate pain (e.g., negative emotions enhance pain, positive emotions inhibit pain), increased pain risk in SA survivors could stem from a disruption of emotional modulation processes. Methods: A well-valid...
Article
Anger management styles (i.e., anger-in and anger-out) characterize a person's typical response to anger. Anger-in, the suppression of anger, and anger-out, the outward expression of anger, have been associated with increased acute and chronic pain. Previous research suggests that anger-in is related to pain because of its shared variance with nega...
Article
Full-text available
Interoception refers to the process by which the nervous system senses, interprets, and integrates signals originating from within the body, providing a moment-by-moment mapping of the body’s internal landscape across conscious and unconscious levels. Interoceptive signaling has been considered a component process of reflexes, urges, feelings, driv...
Chapter
Pain is a tremendously malleable experience, and emotions are one of many psychological factors that modulate it. This chapter examines the emotion–pain relationship and provides a motivational framework for understanding it. It is suggested that a valence-by-arousal interaction characterizes the influence of emotions on pain in healthy humans. Spe...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: The aim of this study was to conduct a preliminary dismantling study of exposure, relaxation, and rescripting therapy (ERRT) for nightmares. Method: Participants (N = 70) were randomized to 1 of 2 conditions: ERRT with nightmare exposure and rescripting (full protocol; EX) or ERRT without nightmare exposure and rescripting (NEX). Part...
Article
Habituation (ie, decreases in responding) and sensitization (ie, increases in responding) after prolonged or repeated exposures to a fixed stimulus have been identified as important in adaptation to repeated or prolonged noxious stimulation. Determinants of habituation or sensitization are poorly understood, and experimental investigation of habitu...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Ample behavioral and neurobiological evidence links sleep and affective functioning. Recent self-report evidence suggests that the affective problems associated with sleep loss may be stronger for positive versus negative affective state, and that those effects may be mediated by changes in electroencepholographically measured slow wave...
Article
Nightmares and sleep disturbances are gaining attention as targets of treatment interventions for trauma-exposed populations. Measures in trials evaluating these interventions tend to utilize proprietary measures of nightmare characteristics, creating a challenge in comparing findings across studies. The Trauma-Related Nightmare Survey (TRNS) is a...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: Prior research has shown a relationship between blood glucose levels and some forms of self-regulation (eg, executive function), with low blood glucose levels associated with impaired self-regulation. Further, engagement in self-regulation tasks depletes blood glucose. Given these relationships, the present study examined whether blood...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is characterized by severe affective and physical symptoms, such as increased pain, during the late-luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. The mechanisms underlying hyperalgesia in women with PMDD have yet to be identified, and supraspinal pain modulation has yet to be examined in this population. The...
Chapter
Pain is a tremendously malleable experience, and emotions are one of many psychological factors that modulate it. This chapter examines the emotion-pain relationship and provides a motivational framework for understanding it. It is suggested that a valence-by-arousal interaction characterizes the influence of emotions on pain in healthy humans. Spe...