Jamie Ostroff

Jamie Ostroff
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center | MSKCC · Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences

PhD

About

188
Publications
16,319
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7,475
Citations
Citations since 2016
60 Research Items
3058 Citations
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Introduction
My research focuses on cancer prevention, control and survivorship, with a particular focus on lung and other tobacco-related cancers. Current projects include a cluster RCT designed to improve implementation of clinical practice guidelines for treating tobacco dependence in dental settings, RCT of brief cessation intervention for smokers seeking lung cancer screening, development of a tobacco-focused model of patient navigation, and RCT of tobacco cessation in breast cancer patients.

Publications

Publications (188)
Article
PURPOSE More than half of individuals with serious mental illness (SMI) smoke, contributing to premature cancer mortality. A cancer diagnosis provides an opportunity to assist with smoking cessation; however, supportive oncology trials frequently exclude patients with SMI. To fill this gap, we examined differences in engagement and tobacco cessatio...
Article
Objectives: To examine whether aspects of disease-specific stigma are barriers to advocacy among individuals with lung cancer. Sample & setting: 266 patients with lung cancer treated at two National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers in the United States. Methods & variables: Patients completed a cross-sectional survey. D...
Article
Background: Lung cancer screening has the potential to identify lung cancer at an early stage when more treatment options exist. However, discussions with and referrals of screening-eligible patients remain unacceptably low. We need to better understand clinician knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns to identify strategies to improve lung ca...
Article
Full-text available
Based on the findings from the National Lung Screening Trial, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends annual low dose computed tomography (LDCT) lung cancer screening (LCS) among high-risk adults. Approximately 54% of individuals seeking LCS report current cigarette smoking. Effective smoking cessation interventions, offered at the time...
Article
Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the translation and psychometric testing of the Lung Cancer Screening Health Belief Scale (LCSHBS) into Spanish. Methods: The English version of the LCSHBS was professionally translated in accordance with best practices in the translation of patient-reported outcome tools. The independent certifie...
Article
Full-text available
Background There is widespread agreement that the integration of cessation services in lung cancer screening (LCS) is essential for achieving the full benefits of LCS with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT). There is a formidable knowledge gap about how to best design feasible, effective, and scalable cessation services in LCS facilities. A collec...
Article
Full-text available
Background Persistent smoking among patients diagnosed with cancer is associated with adverse clinical outcomes, yet an evidence-based tobacco use intervention has not been well-integrated into cancer care in community oncology settings. This paper describes the protocol of a nation-wide clinical trial conducted by the ECOG-ACRIN National Cancer In...
Article
Importance: Guidelines recommend cancer care clinicians offer smoking cessation treatment. Cost analyses will help stakeholders understand and plan for implementation of cessation programs. Objective: To estimate the incremental cost per quit (ICQ) of adopting an intensive smoking cessation intervention among patients undergoing treatment at can...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction The NCI Smoking Cessation at Lung Examination (SCALE) Collaboration includes eight clinical trials testing smoking cessation interventions delivered with lung cancer screening (LCS). This investigation compared pooled participant baseline demographic and smoking characteristics of seven SCALE trials to LCS-eligible smokers in three US...
Article
6514 Background: Tobacco use is a modifiable risk factor for adverse outcomes among patients diagnosed with cancer. Despite ASCO’s recommendation for assessment and treatment of tobacco use, integration into cancer care is suboptimal. Socioeconomic contexts influence access and utilization of tobacco treatment, but little is known about the relatio...
Article
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Purpose Little is known about non-tobacco substance use (SU) and its treatment in cancer patients. National guidelines address tobacco only, and assessment of SU in cancer patients is not standardized. It is not clear how oncology clinicians assess, document, and follow-up on SU. Methods We conducted an electronic health record review of patients...
Article
Background This intensive longitudinal study describes key events in the process of smoking cessation after a new head and neck cancer (HNC) diagnosis. Prior longitudinal studies show some cancer patients quit while others continue to smoke, but details about the pattern in which these discrete outcomes arise is scarce. This study is meant to help...
Article
Introduction: To eliminate tobacco-related disparities, tobacco control research would benefit from a paradigm shift. Intersectionality, a framework pioneered by Kimberlé Crenshaw in late 1980s, has the potential to improve our understanding of why and how certain social groups are disproportionately harmed by commercial tobacco use, and improve o...
Article
Full-text available
There are evidence-based treatments for tobacco dependence, but inequities exist in the access to and reach of these treatments. Traditional models of tobacco treatment delivery are “reactive” and typically provide treatment only to patients who are highly motivated to quit and seek out tobacco treatment. Newer models involve “proactive” outreach,...
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Objective To characterize lung cancer patients' reactions to cancer care providers' (CCPs) assessment of smoking behavior and to develop recommendations to reduce stigma and improve patient-clinician communication about smoking in the context of lung cancer care. Methods Semi-structured interviews with 56 lung cancer patients (Study 1) and focus g...
Preprint
BACKGROUND A cancer diagnosis can catalyze motivation to quit smoking. Tobacco treatment trials (TTTs) offer evidence-based cessation resources but suffer from low accrual rates. Digital outreach through clinician-delivered videos may improve recruitment efforts. However, understanding of how best to frame trial information and promote participatio...
Article
Background: A cancer diagnosis can catalyze motivation to quit smoking. Tobacco treatment trials offer cessation resources but have low accrual rates. Digital outreach may improve accrual, but knowledge of how best to recruit smokers with recent diagnoses is limited. Objective: This study aims to identify the message frames that were most effect...
Article
Objective: Few psychosocial interventions have been tailored to meet the unique needs of patients diagnosed with lung cancer. This pilot study developed and tested a six-week intervention for reducing lung cancer stigma.Design and Subjects: Guided by qualitative interviews conducted with 9 lung cancer patients and 5 thoracic oncology care providers...
Article
Introduction: Many cancer patients who smoke report concurrent e-cigarette use. Using a mixed-methods approach, we aimed to (1) describe longitudinal e-cigarette use over 6 months after a cancer diagnosis and (2) assess the association between e-cigarette use and smoking cessation, among cancer patients in a smoking cessation trial. Methods: Dat...
Article
Purpose: Determine the association between biochemically verified post-diagnosis smoking exposure and non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) recurrence risk. Materials and methods: We conducted a prospective study of 354 NMIBC patients with a smoking history undergoing care between 2015 and 2018. Patients contributed at least two biospecimen...
Article
Purpose Cancer patients who smoke may experience significant stigma due both to their disease, and negative attitudes and beliefs regarding smoking. We investigated whether internalized stigma differed between currently smoking cancer patients diagnosed with lung or head and neck cancers, other smoking related cancers, and non smoking-related cance...
Preprint
Background There is widespread agreement that integration of cessation services in lung cancer screening (LCS) is essential for achieving the full benefits of LCS with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT). There is a formidable knowledge gap about how to best design feasible, effective and scalable cessation services in LCS facilities. A collective...
Article
Full-text available
The NCI’s Cancer Center Cessation Initiative (C3I) has a specific objective of helping cancer centers develop and implement sustainable programs to routinely address tobacco cessation with patients. Sustaining tobacco treatment programs requires the maintenance of (1) core program components, (2) ongoing implementation strategies, and (3) program o...
Article
Despite remarkable progress, tobacco control efforts are not equitably distributed, and tobacco-related disparities continue to contribute to significant health disparities. Our premise in this commentary is that Intersectionality can serve as a productive analytical framework for examining tobacco-related disparities across and within multiple mar...
Article
Introduction: Adoption of rigorous standards for reporting treatment fidelity is essential for advancing discovery, validation, and implementation of behavioral treatments. Whereas the NIH Behavior Change Consortium (BCC) developed an assessment tool to assess quality of reporting and monitoring of treatment fidelity across health behavior change...
Article
Significance: Increased rates of smoking cessation will be essential to maximize the population benefit of low-dose CT screening for lung cancer. The NCI's Smoking Cessation at Lung Examination (SCALE) Collaboration includes eight randomized trials, each assessing evidence-based interventions among smokers undergoing lung cancer screening (LCS). W...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Cancer patients who smoke report more stress and psychological distress than patients who do not smoke. It is unclear how these emotional symptoms may modify smoking behavior in cancer patients. We examined the influence of a smoking cessation intervention for cancer patients on stress and distress, and the effects of these symptoms on...
Article
Background: Clinical practice guidelines for promoting smoking cessation in cancer care exist; however, most oncology settings have not established tobacco use assessment and treatment as standard care. Inadequate staff training and other implementation challenges have been identified as barriers for delivery of evidence-based tobacco treatment. P...
Article
Aims Among people with cancer, dual alcohol and tobacco use increases risk for morbidity and mortality. Most smoking cessation clinical trials with this patient population have excluded individuals with problematic alcohol use. This investigation examined whether problematic alcohol use affects smoking cessation in cancer patients. Methods Mixed-m...
Article
Psycho-Oncology, 4th edition, follows the publication of Psycho-Oncology, 3rd edition in 2015. This is the latest in the series of textbooks which have defined the field of psycho-oncology. William Breitbart, MD, serves as the new senior editor along with associate editors Phyllis N. Butow, PhD, MPH, of the University of Sydney; Paul B. Jacobsen, P...
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The last decade has shown significant progress in the fight against lung cancer, including advances in effective tobacco control, screening, targeted treatments, immunotherapies, and supportive care. At the same time, increased attention has highlighted the challenges faced by patients with lung cancer and their families, most notably the stigma as...
Article
Purpose: Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for developing non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and continued smoking exposure after diagnosis may increase the likelihood of adverse clinical outcomes. Here we compare self-reported vs. biochemically-verified nicotine exposure to determine the accuracy of self-report among recently diagnosed N...
Article
Background Despite the clinical importance of assessing smoking history and advising patients who smoke to quit, lung cancer patients often experience feelings of blame and stigma during clinical encounters with their oncology care providers (OCPs). Promoting empathic communication during these encounters may help reduce patients’ experience of sti...
Article
Importance Persistent smoking may cause adverse outcomes among patients with cancer. Many cancer centers have not fully implemented evidence-based tobacco treatment into routine care. Objective To determine the effectiveness of sustained telephone counseling and medication (intensive treatment) compared with shorter-term telephone counseling and m...
Article
History has shown that we must adapt and learn from crises so that we can improve how we deliver care and conduct research to improve clinical outcomes. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) pandemic has expedited work regarding virtual research methods and serves as an opportunity to evaluate how to initiate, implement, and sustain cancer preven...
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Accurate classification of smoking status has long been regarded as an essential prerequisite for advancing tobacco-related epidemiologic, treatment, and policy research. However, the descriptors we commonly use to classify people who smoke may inadvertently perpetuate harmful, stigmatizing beliefs and negative stereotypes. In recognizing the power...
Article
Objective Empathic communication in clinical consultations is mutually constructed, with patients first presenting empathic opportunities (statements communicating emotions, challenges, or progress) to which clinicians can respond. We hypothesized that lung cancer patients who did not present empathic opportunities during routine consultations woul...
Article
Most lung cancer patients report perceiving stigma surrounding their diagnosis, and routine clinical interactions with their health care providers (HCPs) are reported as a common source. The adverse effects of lung cancer stigma are associated with several adverse psychosocial and behavioral outcomes. One potential clinician-level intervention targ...
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Full-text available
Purpose: The current study investigated whether dispositional tendencies to experience shame and guilt (i.e., shame- and guilt- proneness) were associated with higher levels of internalized stigma and, in turn, higher depressive symptoms and anxiety in adults with lung cancer. Method: Participants (N = 50, 56.0% female) were men and women who re...
Article
Full-text available
Background Lung cancer patients commonly report stigma, often attributing it to the well-established association of smoking as the leading preventable cause. Theory and research suggest that patients’ smoking history may differentiate patients’ experience of lung cancer stigma. However, there is inconsistent evidence whether lung cancer stigma vari...
Article
Risk perception is an important construct in many health behavior theories. Smoking risk perceptions are thoughts and feelings about the harms associated with cigarette smoking. Wide variation in the terminology, definition, and assessment of this construct makes it difficult to draw conclusions about the associations of risk perceptions with smoki...
Article
Despite the importance of empathic communication in cancer patient outcomes, the majority of opportunities to respond empathically to a patient’s concern within clinical consultations are “missed” (i.e., 70-90%), or not responded to by physicians. The present study examined the empathic opportunities and responses within clinical consultations of l...
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Full-text available
Background: The prevalence of electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use and its impact on smoking cessation among cancer survivors in the United States is largely unknown. We sought to estimate the prevalence of e-cigarette use and examine its associations with cigarette smoking and smoking quit attempts among smoking-related cancer survivors in the...
Article
Objectives: Head and neck cancer (HNC) constitutes a substantial portion of the cancer burden worldwide, with over 550,000 new cases and over 300,000 deaths annually, with disproportionately high mortality rates in the developing countries. The large majority of HNCs are caused by tobacco use, and synergistic effects of tobacco and alcohol use. Usi...
Article
Background: Many tobacco dependent cancer survivors continue to smoke after diagnosis and treatment. This study investigated the extent to which hospital-based cancer registries could be used to identify smokers in order to offer them assistance in quitting. The concordance of tobacco use coded in the registry was compared with tobacco use as code...
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One third of smokers diagnosed with cancer continue smoking, perhaps due to low perceived cancer–related benefits of cessation. To examine perceived cancer–related benefits of quitting among newly diagnosed cancer patients who smoke and associations with quit intentions, baseline measures from patients (N = 303) enrolled in a randomized controlled...
Article
Objectives: Historically, long-term survival following diagnosis of lung cancer has been a rare occurrence. An overall poor prognosis and the low likelihood of long-term survival are thought to precipitate survivors experiencing what is referred to as survivor guilt. This study explored the prevalence and nature of survivor guilt among lung cancer...
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Full-text available
Many patients with cancer use electronic cigarettes (e‐cigarettes), yet little is known about patterns and reasons for use. Using cross‐sectional baseline data from a randomized controlled trial, we aimed to describe prevalence and correlates of e‐cigarette use, frequency of use, and reasons for use among smokers recently diagnosed with cancer. Par...
Article
Background: The prevalence of e-cigarette use, and its impact on smoking cessation, among cancer survivors in the United States is unknown. We sought to estimate the prevalence of e-cigarette use, and examine its associations with cigarette smoking and quit attempts among survivors of smoking-related cancer survivors in the United States. Methods:...
Article
Full-text available
Background Although smoking cessation apps have become popular, few have been tested in randomized clinical trials or undergone formative evaluation with target users. Objective We developed a cessation app targeting tobacco-dependent cancer patients. Game design and behavioral rehearsal principles were incorporated to help smokers identify, model,...
Preprint
BACKGROUND Although smoking cessation apps have become popular, few have been tested in randomized clinical trials or undergone formative evaluation with target users. OBJECTIVE We developed a cessation app targeting tobacco-dependent cancer patients. Game design and behavioral rehearsal principles were incorporated to help smokers identify, model...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: We describe the unique selling propositions (USPs) (propositions used to convince customers to use a particular brand/product by focusing on the unique benefit) of print tobacco ads. Methods: A qualitative content analysis was conducted of print tobacco ads (N = 171) selected from August 2012 to August 2013 for cigarettes, moist snuf...
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Background A healthy lifestyle is associated with improved quality of life among cancer survivors, yet adherence to health behavior recommendations is low. Objective This pilot trial developed and tested the feasibility of a tailored eHealth program to increase fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity among older, long-term cancer sur...
Chapter
Certain health behaviors increase the risk of being diagnosed with cancer. It has been estimated that 35% of cancer deaths throughout the world could be avoided through adoption of health promoting behaviors. This chapter summarizes research on the effects of behavioral risk factors on cancer incidence and behavioral interventions for cancer preven...
Article
Engagement in physical activity can provide important benefits for cancer patients and survivors, including those diagnosed with lung cancer. Despite this, many survivors do not engage in recommended levels of physical activity and little is known about the obstacles encountered by lung cancer survivors. The current study examines the physical acti...
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Full-text available
Despite many efforts at developing relapse prevention interventions, most smokers relapse to tobacco use within a few months after quitting. Interactive games offer a novel strategy for helping people develop the skills required for successful tobacco cessation. The objective of our study was to develop a video game that enables smokers to practice...
Article
Pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and distress are commonly reported cancer-related symptoms, but few studies have examined the effects of multiple concurrent symptoms in longer-term cancer survivors. We examined the impact of varying degrees of symptom burden on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and performance status in surgically treated non-small ce...
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The National Comprehensive Cancer Network and the American Cancer Society recently released lung screening guidelines that include smoking cessation counseling for smokers undergoing screening. Previous work indicates that smoking behaviors and risk perceptions of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) participants were relatively unchanged. We e...
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Gutka and tambaku paan (smokeless tobacco products used by South Asian immigrants) are carcinogenic to humans (and perceived as such), yet, one-fourth of South Asian immigrants report current use. This study examined disengagement beliefs that perpetuate gutka/tambaku paan use among South Asians despite awareness of health risks. Six focus groups w...
Article
Objective: Cancer patients who smoke are advised to quit smoking to reduce treatment complications and future cancer risk. This study's main objective was to evaluate the efficacy of a novel, presurgical cessation intervention in newly diagnosed cancer patients scheduled for surgical hospitalization. Method: We conducted a parallel-arm, randomiz...