Jamie Craggs

Jamie Craggs
University of Derby · Department of Environmental Sciences

About

23
Publications
7,834
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195
Citations
Introduction
Jamie Craggs currently works at the Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Derby. Jamie does research in Marine Biology, Microbiology and Ecology. Their current project is 'PROJECT CORAL: Inducing Ex-situ Broadcast Coral Spawning'.

Publications

Publications (23)
Preprint
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Reef-building corals owe their evolutionary success to their symbiosis with unicellular algae (Symbiodiniaceae). However, increasingly frequent heat waves lead to coral mass-bleaching events and pose a serious threat to the survival of reef ecosystems. Despite significant efforts, a mechanistic understanding of coral-algal symbiosis functioning, wh...
Article
Full-text available
The unprecedented threats to coral reef ecosystems from global climate change require an urgent response from the aquarium community, which is becoming an increasingly vital coral conservation resource. Unfortunately, many hermatypic corals in aquaria are not identified to species level, which hinders assessment of their conservation significance....
Article
Full-text available
Coral research is being ushered into the genomic era. To fully capitalize on the potential discoveries from this genomic revolution, the rapidly increasing number of high-quality genomes requires effective pairing with rigorous taxonomic characterizations of specimens and the contextualization of their ecological relevance. However, to date there i...
Article
Full-text available
Coral cover on tropical reefs has declined during the last three decades due to the combined effects of climate change, destructive fishing, pollution, and land use change. Drastic reductions in greenhouse gas emissions combined with effective coastal management and conservation strategies are essential to slow this decline. Innovative approaches,...
Article
Full-text available
Members of the family Meandrinidae are highly susceptible to stony coral tissue loss disease, resulting in population reductions up to 88% in both Dendrogyra cylindrus and Meandrina meandrites along the Florida Reef Tract. Reductions in abundance on this scale leave these species susceptible to limitations in sexual reproduction and natural recover...
Article
Full-text available
Coral reefs are suffering unprecedented declines in health state on a global scale. Some have suggested that human assisted evolution or assisted gene flow may now be necessary to effectively restore reefs and pre-condition them for future climate change. An understanding of the key metabolic processes in corals, including under stressed conditions...
Preprint
Full-text available
Coral cover on tropical reefs has declined during the last three decades due to the combined effects of climate change, destructive fishing, pollution, and land use change. Drastic reductions in greenhouse gas emissions combined with effective coastal management and conservation strategies are essential to slow this decline. Innovative approaches,...
Preprint
The unprecedented threats to coral reef ecosystems from global climate change (GCC) require an urgent response from the aquarium community, which is becoming an increasingly vital coral conservation resource. Unfortunately, many hermatypic corals in aquaria are not identified to species level, which hinders assessment of their conservation signific...
Article
Full-text available
Studies of broadcast spawning in corals are fundamental to our understanding of early life history characteristics, reproductive biology, restoration etc. Spawning of corals for research is routinely conducted, but this is mostly restricted to sites adjacent to reefs and from broodstock collected from the wild just prior to gamete release. Only rec...
Article
Full-text available
Reef restoration efforts, utilising sexual coral propagation need up-scaling to have ecologically meaningful impact. Post-settlement survival bottlenecks, in part due to competitive benthic algae interactions should be addressed, to improve productivity for these initiatives. Sea urchins are keystone grazers in reef ecosystems, yet feeding behaviou...
Article
The majority of research focusing on coral reproductive biology (e.g. spawning timing and synchrony) is carried out in facilities adjacent to reefs that the corals originated from. This is in part because transporting corals over long distances by air leads to sub-lethal stress that may confound the results of any experimental study. However, these...
Article
Full-text available
For many corals, the timing of broadcast spawning correlates strongly with a number of environmental signals (seasonal temperature, lunar, and diel cycles). Robust experimental studies examining the role of these putative cues in triggering spawning have been lacking until recently because it has not been possible to predictably induce spawning in...
Article
Prokaryotic and ciliate communities of healthy and aquarium White Syndrome (WS)-affected coral fragments were screened using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). A significant difference (R = 0.907, p < 0.001) in 16S rRNA prokaryotic diversity was found between healthy (H), sloughed tissue (ST), WS-affected (WSU) and antibiotic treated (...
Article
Full-text available
The influence of copepod prey size and behaviour upon Aurelia aurita medusae predation rates was investigated. There was no significant difference in predation rates across a 4-fold (250 to 987 μm) prey size range (heat-killed developmental stages of Acartia tonsa). Any behavioural differences (e.g. swimming speed, escape response) across live A. t...
Article
Bacterial and ciliate assemblages associated with aquarium corals displaying white syndrome (WS) and brown jelly syndrome (BJS) were investigated. Healthy (n = 10) and diseased corals (WS n = 18; BJS n = 3) were analysed for 16S rRNA gene bacterial diversity, total bacterial abundance and vibrio-specific 16S rRNA gene abundance. This was conducted...
Article
Coral diseases are a major factor in the decline of coral reefs worldwide, and a large proportion of studies focusing on disease causation use aquaria to control variables that affect disease occurrence and development. Public aquaria can therefore provide an invaluable resource to study the factors contributing to health and disease. In November 2...
Article
Full-text available
In order to quantify the trophic impact of gelatinous predators, digestion time estimates are commonly applied to counts of prey in the guts. Three primary approaches are used, the Manual-feeding, Natural-feeding and Steady-state methods; these differ in methodology and their underlying assumptions. The criteria used to define the end-point of dige...
Article
Full-text available
The effect of increased levels of suspended sediment on fertilization success in the scleractinian coral Pectinia lactuca was investigated in a laboratory experiment following a mass coral spawning event on reefs off Singapore. Egg–sperm bundles were collected from tank-spawned coral colonies collected from the field several days prior to the antic...
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Projects

Project (1)
Project
In 2012 a research experiment was designed to induce broadcast coral to spawning in captivity. Using the latest microprocessor technologies the precise environmental cues, including temperature, photoperiod and lunar cycle have been replicated in the coral research facility at the Horniman Museum and Gardens. In 2013 this resulted in the first predictable broadcast coral spawning, in a completely close system, in world. Reacting to this achievement the museum official founded PROJECT CORAL, an umbrella, multiyear coral reproductive research project with two broad aims. • To understand how climate change affects the ability of broadcast corals to reproduce. • To develop techniques to enable the sexual reproduction of corals in captivity to facilitate the sustainable aquaculture of coral. Utilising microprocessor controlled coral research systems at the museum a number of experiments, in collaboration with scientific and corporate partners, are being conducted. Each experiment is / will focus on a specific area of coral reproduction and will contribute significantly to our understanding of the larger aims of Project Coral. In the initial stages protocols will be developed to reliably induce spawning events. These will then provide the foundations for more direct environmentally relevant research investigating the impacts of climate change on broadcast and brooding coral reproduction and our understanding of coral reef resilience.