James D Young

James D Young
United States Department of Agriculture | USDA · USDA APHIS PPQ National Identification Service

Ph.D.

About

10
Publications
1,555
Reads
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25
Citations
Citations since 2016
3 Research Items
21 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022012345
Introduction
Currently in year 7 of developing a screening key for Gelechioidea larvae found in international commerce. I am also an active member of the Natural History Society of Maryland and serve as the Curator of the Invertebrate collections.
Additional affiliations
September 2009 - October 2015
United States Department of Agriculture
Position
  • Entomologist Identifier
November 2006 - September 2009
Oregon State University
Position
  • Instructor/ Extension Entomologist
Education
August 2002 - August 2006
University of Georgia
Field of study
  • Entomology
August 1998 - May 2002
State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Field of study
  • Environmental and Forest Biology [Forest Pathology]

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
Lake Roland Park is owned by the City of Baltimore and was leased to Baltimore County after its original purpose as a raw water supply reservoir had become obsolete. The northern part of the park contains a tract of land that is geologically classified as serpentine barrens. This unique habitat is degrading due to clearcutting and subsequent replan...
Article
Carposina ottawana Kearfott, 1907 (Lepidoptera: Carposinidae), revised status, formerly considered a synonym of C. sasakii Matsumura, 1900, is returned to species status. Morphological features that separate the Asian species C. sasakii and C. niponensis Walsingham, 1900 from the North American C. ottawana are described and illustrated. A heuristic...
Article
Clearwing moths (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) are day-flying hornet and wasp mimics that can be found visiting flowers for nectar. Larvae bore in the roots, branches and trunks of woody and some herbaceous plants. Some of these larvae are pests in orchards, nurseries and commercial forestry operations. For example, Synanthedon exitiosa (Say) and Synanthe...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A new digital identification tool, “Microlepidoptera on Solanaceae” (http://idtools.org/id/leps/micro/) was developed through the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service’s Identification Technology Program (ITP) and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry (FDACS-DPI), with the goal of enhancin...
Article
Full-text available
The moth Hypena opulenta (Christoph, 1877) (Lepidoptera: Erebidae) was approved for release in eastern Canada and is pending approval in the United States of America as a biological control agent of the invasive European swallow-worts (Vince- toxicum spp.). Descriptions of the adult in Noctuidae Europeae do not accurately represent the color morph...
Article
Full-text available
The taxonomic focus of this digital identification tool is two groups of Microlepidoptera: the tribe Gnorimoschemini (Gelechioidea: Gelechiidae) and the Leucinodes group of Crambidae (Pyraloidea). These two taxa include numerous species that feed specifically on Solanaceae and have economic importance. Macrolepidoptera (large moths) that feed on So...
Article
The Nantucket pine tip moth, Rhyacionia frustrana (Scudder in Comstock) is a common pest of several southern pine species. Some tip moth research requires the sexing of pupae in order to collect emerging adults of known ages or unmated females. Characters for determining the sex of tip moth pupae were originally described in 1969. Here, we revise o...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
A practical key to the families being intercepted entering the U.S. from foreign destinations is being developed.
Project
A key to the larvae being intercepted at U.S. ports of entry is being developed to facility the identification of gelechiid pests and expedite the movement of imported goods.