James Whiting

James Whiting
The University of Calgary | HBI

Doctor of Philosophy

About

21
Publications
2,330
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
95
Citations
Introduction
I am interested in evolution within natural systems and the role of the local environment in manipulating evolution at the gene level. More recently this has led me to genomics, in which I am interested in the predictability and convergence of adaptive genomic evolution in response to common selection pressures. I am currently researching these questions as part of the Fraser Lab, investigating the convergent genomic changes in natural populations of Trinidadian guppies that have repeatedly adapted to low-predation environments from high-predation sources. My specialisms include evolutionary genetics and genomics, bioinformatics, statistics and R-coding. Read more at https://biosciences.exeter.ac.uk/staff/profile/index.php?web_id=James_Whiting#1w0yYyxAhvYZkhdH.99

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
Full-text available
Male colour patterns of the Trinidadian guppy ( Poecilia reticulata ) are typified by extreme variation governed by both natural and sexual selection. Since guppy colour patterns are often inherited faithfully from fathers to sons, it has been hypothesised that many of the colour trait genes must be physically linked to sex determining loci as a ‘s...
Article
The repeatability of evolution at the genetic level has been demonstrated to vary along a continuum from complete parallelism to divergence. In order to better understand why this continuum exists within and among systems, hypotheses must be tested using high‐confidence candidate loci for repeatability. However, few methods have been developed to s...
Article
Full-text available
Although rapid phenotypic evolution has been documented often, the genomic basis of rapid adaptation to natural environments is largely unknown in multicellular organisms. Population genomic studies of experimental populations of Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata) provide a unique opportunity to study this phenomenon. Guppy populations that...
Article
Full-text available
The genetic basis of traits shapes and constrains how adaptation proceeds in nature; rapid adaptation can proceed using stores of polygenic standing genetic variation or hard selective sweeps, and increasing polygenicity fuels genetic redundancy, reducing gene re-use (genetic convergence). Guppy life history traits evolve rapidly and convergently a...
Preprint
Full-text available
1) The repeatability of evolution at the genetic level has been demonstrated to vary along a continuum from complete parallelism to divergence. In order to better understand why this continuum exists within and among systems, hypotheses must be tested using high-confidence sets of candidate loci for repeatability. Despite this, few methods have bee...
Article
Full-text available
Studies of convergence in wild populations have been instrumental in understanding adaptation by providing strong evidence for natural selection. At the genetic level, we are beginning to appreciate that the re-use of the same genes in adaptation occurs through different mechanisms and can be constrained by underlying trait architectures and demogr...
Preprint
Full-text available
Colour polymorphism provides a tractable trait that can be harnessed to explore the evolution of sexual selection and sexual conflict. Male colour patterns of the Trinidadian guppy ( Poecilia reticulata ) are governed by both natural and sexual selection, and are typified by extreme pattern colour variation as a result of negative frequency depende...
Preprint
Full-text available
The genetic basis of traits can shape and constrain how adaptation proceeds in nature; rapid adaptation can be facilitated by polygenic traits, whereas polygenic traits may restrict re-use of the same genes in adaptation (genetic convergence). The rapidly evolving life histories of guppies in response to predation risk provide an opportunity to tes...
Preprint
Full-text available
It is now accepted that phenotypic evolution can occur quickly but the genetic basis of rapid adaptation to natural environments is largely unknown in multicellular organisms. Population genomic studies of experimental populations of Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata) provide a unique opportunity to study this phenomenon. Guppy populations t...
Article
Full-text available
Parallelism, the evolution of similar traits in populations diversifying in similar conditions, provides strong evidence of adaptation by natural selection. Many studies of parallelism focus on comparisons of different ecotypes or contrasting environments, defined a priori, which could upwardly bias the apparent prevalence of parallelism. Here, we...
Preprint
Full-text available
Studies of convergence in wild populations have been instrumental in understanding adaptation by providing strong evidence for natural selection. At the genetic level, we are beginning to appreciate that the re-use of the same genes in adaptation occurs through different mechanisms and can be constrained by underlying trait architectures and demogr...
Article
Full-text available
Theory predicts that the sexes can achieve greater fitness if loci with sexually antagonistic polymorphisms become linked to the sex determining loci, and this can favour the spread of reduced recombination around sex determining regions. Given that sex-linked regions are frequently repetitive and highly heterozygous, few complete Y chromosome asse...
Preprint
Full-text available
Theory predicts that the sexes can achieve greater fitness if loci with sexually antagonistic polymorphisms become linked to the sex determining loci, and this can favour the spread of reduced recombination around sex determining regions. Given that sex-linked regions are frequently repetitive and highly heterozygous, few complete Y chromosome asse...
Article
Full-text available
Seasonal disease and parasitic infection are common across organisms, including humans, and there is increasing evidence for intrinsic seasonal variation in immune systems. Changes are orchestrated through organisms' physiological clocks using cues such as day length. Ample research in diverse taxa has demonstrated multiple immune responses are mod...
Article
Full-text available
Outlier scans, in which the genome is scanned for signatures of selection, have become a prominent tool in studies of local adaptation, and more recently studies of genetic convergence in natural populations. However, such methods have the potential to be confounded by features of demographic history, such as population size and migration, which ar...
Preprint
Full-text available
Parallelism, the evolution of similar traits in populations diversifying in similar conditions, provides good evidence of adaptation by natural selection. Many studies of parallelism have focused on comparisons of strongly different ecotypes or sharply contrasting environments, defined a priori, which could upwardly bias the apparent prevalence of...
Preprint
Full-text available
Outlier scans, in which the genome is scanned for signatures of selection, have become a prominent tool in studies of local adaptation, and more recently studies of genetic convergence in natural populations. However, these methods have the potential to be confounded by features of demographic history, which are considerably variable across natural...
Article
Full-text available
Convergent evolution, where independent lineages evolve similar phenotypes in response to similar challenges, can provide valuable insight into how selection operates and the limitations it encounters. However, it has only recently become possible to explore how convergent evolution is reflected at the genomic level. The overlapping outlier approac...
Article
The processes driving and maintaining variable immune responses are poorly understood compared with other aspects of an organism’s ecology. This is particularly true from an evolutionary perspective, as the evolutionary relationships between immune responses and other traits and processes in nature remain inadequately explored. I investigated these...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how wild immune variation covaries with other traits can reveal how costs and trade‐offs shape immune evolution in the wild. Divergent life history strategies may increase or alleviate immune costs, helping shape immune variation in a consistent, testable way. Contrasting hypotheses suggest that shorter life histories may alleviate co...

Network

Cited By

Projects