James Stratton

James Stratton
University of British Columbia - Vancouver | UBC

Ph.D. in Linguistics

About

13
Publications
3,806
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26
Citations
Introduction
I am a Germanic linguist, specializing in language variation and change and second language acquisition. I am currently engaged in two long-term research projects. The first investigates intensification in Germanic languages (e.g., English, German, Norwegian) and the second attempts to establish a variationist tradition in work on understudied languages and dialects, correlating linguistic variability with linguistic and social constraints.
Education
June 2017 - May 2021
Purdue University
Field of study
  • Germanic Linguistics
August 2015 - May 2017
Purdue University
Field of study
  • German Linguistics
September 2011 - July 2015
University of Liverpool
Field of study
  • German and Hispanic Studies

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Full-text available
In some present-day varieties of British English the adverbial 'well' can function as an adjective intensifier, as in utterances such as 'it’s well good' and 'it’s well weird'. The present study explores the use of this adjective intensifier in the popular British TV show 'The Inbetweeners' in an attempt to shed light on its contemporary use within...
Article
While the study of English intensifiers has been a topic of much empirical discussion, intensification in the German language is underexplored. The present study operationalizes variationist methods to comprehensively examine the syntactic intensification of adjectives in German by investigating how adjective intensifiers rank empirically in terms...
Article
Following the Labovian paradigm, the present study uses variationist quantitative methods to examine the linguistic and social factors influencing adjective choices in German. By focusing on adjectives of positive evaluation (such as cool ‘cool’, toll/geil/krass ‘great’), an analysis of over 3,000 tokens reveals that the choice of using one adjecti...
Article
Full-text available
While the use of well as an intensifier of most adjectives had supposedly died out by Early Modern English (Fettig: 1934: 186; Mustanoja 1960: 327; Stenström 2000: 188; Ito & Tagliamonte 2003: 278), no studies have empirically examined its frequency diachronically. The present study traces its use from Early Modern English (1560) to Present Day Eng...
Article
Full-text available
The second-wave feminist movement and the publication of the "Richtlinien zur Vermeidung sexistischen Sprachgebrauchs" catalyzed the rise of many gender-fair innovations in Modern Standard German (Guentherodt et al. 1980). While multiple studies have shown that gender-fair innovations such as the "Paarform" 'pair form' are used frequently in writte...
Chapter
The advent of mass electronically available diachronic corpora has undoubtedly changed the methodological plane of historical linguistics. The aim of this chapter is to provide an overview of the types of diachronic corpora available for English, outline the steps to carrying out a diachronic analysis, and lay out some of the challenges and shortco...
Article
Full-text available
Growing evidence suggests that the language used in fictional television can be a fair representation of contemporary language use and changes within the linguistic system. To explore this relationship further, the present study uses variationist quantitative methods to examine the composite system of intensifiers, as well as adjectives of strangen...
Article
While many studies have employed variationist methods to examine longitudinal changes in the English intensifier system (e.g., Ito & Tagliamonte 2003; Tagliamonte & Roberts 2005; Tagliamonte 2008; D’Arcy 2015), to date, no variationist studies have tackled the intensifier system of Old English. By providing a critical view of this system at an earl...
Article
Full-text available
Intensifying adverbs have received much scholarly attention for their promise to provide insight into the workings of language variation and change (Bolinger, 1972; Ito & Tagliamonte, 2003; Tagliamonte & Roberts, 2005; Tagliamonte, 2008; D'Arcy, 2015). As intensifiers become overused, dormant ones re-surface or innovative ones emerge (Tagliamonte,...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This project investigates intensifying adverbs in various Germanic languages (e.g., English, German, Norwegian) both synchronically and diachronically (e.g., Old English, Early Modern English, Late Modern English, Modern English). By comparing the linguistic and social constraints conditioning their use in various speech communities a number of crosslinguistic implications emerge.
Project
Despite the plethora of variationist studies on English, few studies have used Labovian variationist methods to examine German variation and change. In response to this lack of scholarship, this long-term project employs variationist methods to examine a wide range of variable phenomena in the German language. The hope is to spark a variationist tradition in work on German which reflects the developments in sociolinguistics in English as well as other languages