James Stanyer

James Stanyer
Loughborough University | Lough · Department of Social Sciences

About

90
Publications
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2,324
Citations

Publications

Publications (90)
Article
We propose deception as a bridging concept that will enhance the study of misinformation, disinformation, and misperceptions. As we set it out here, the concept integrates insights from multiple social science disciplines and uniquely connects actors’ intentions, information, and attitudinal or behavioral outcomes. A focus on deception will enrich...
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While the role of social media in the spread of conspiracy theories has received much attention, a key deficit in previous research is the lack of distinction between different types of platforms. This study places the role of social media affordances in facilitating the spread of conspiracy beliefs at the center of its enquiry. We examine the rela...
Article
Exogenous shocks like the COVID-19 pandemic unleashes multiple fundamental questions about society beyond public health. Based on the classical concept of ‘need for orientation’ and the literature on the role of the media in times of crisis, we investigate to what extent the COVID-19 pandemic affected news consumption in comparative perspective. Ba...
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The transition from low- to high-choice media environments has had far-reaching implications for citizens’ media use and its relationship with political knowledge. However, there is still a lack of comparative research on how citizens combine the usage of different media and how that is related to political knowledge. To fill this void, we use a un...
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Diversity is recognised as a significant criterion for appraising the democratic performance of media systems. This article begins by considering key conceptual debates that help differentiate types and levels of diversity. It then addresses a core methodological challenge in measuring diversity: how do we model statistical variation and difference...
Article
This article represents the first systematic examination of BBC coverage of one of the most controversial rural issues in a generation, namely the culling of badgers (a protected species) to stop the spread of bovine TB in England. While the BBC has certain regulatory responsibilities set out in its guidelines to provide duly impartial coverage it...
Chapter
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Against the background of the variation in populism between countries exposed in the previous chapter by Blassnig et al., this chapter will focus on article, newspaper, and country-level explanatory factors for this variation. Evidence for between-newspaper variation with respect to populist communication has already been presented elsewhere (Manuc...
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The studies in this volume conceptualize populism as a type of political communication and investigate it comparatively, focusing on (a) politicians’ and journalists’ perceptions, (b) media coverage, and (c) effects on citizens. This book presents findings from several large-scale internationally comparative empirical studies, funded by the Europea...
Chapter
This study provides a comprehensive assessment of the issues and personalities that defined an election dominated by the two major parties and particularly their leaders. Coverage of the so-called ‘electoral process’ was not as prominent in this campaign, with a boost in the reporting of policy reflecting the impact of Labour’s leaked manifesto tog...
Chapter
This chapter provides the theoretical background and context for the chapters in the book. It explains the framework behind the research, the countries involved, how the research was funded, and how work was organized. The studies in the book were conducted in the context of a research network that was funded by the European Union framework program...
Chapter
This book started from several assumptions, the key one being that although the rise of populism can be regarded as an international trend, it may take different forms when investigated in an internationally comparative manner. This book set out to look systematically for both similarities and differences in populist political communication process...
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Debates about the role of media and communication in social change are central to our discipline, yet advances in this field are hampered by disciplinary fragmentation, a lack of shared conceptual language, and limited understanding of long-term shifts in the field. To address this, we first develop a typology that distinguishes between approaches...
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In this article, the introduction to a special International Journal of Press/Politics (IJPP) issue on populism, we articulate and define populism as a communication phenomenon. We provide an overview of populist political communication research and its current foci. We offer a framework for ongoing research and set the boundary conditions for a ne...
Chapter
Loughborough University’s team provides a comprehensive study of how the major print and broadcast media covered the campaign. Based on content analysis of the main television bulletins as well as every national newspaper, the chapter explores how the various issues and personalities were represented. Aside from the traditional focus on ‘process’ t...
Chapter
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While there has been a growth of research on digital journalism in recent years and some of these studies are comparative, few of these studies explain what they find effectively. While comparative research is of upmost importance in the study of digital journalism, explaining the findings this research produces remains crucial. The aim of this cha...
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During the last decennia media environments and political communication systems have changed fundamentally. These changes have major ramifications for the political information environments and the extent to which they aid people in becoming informed citizens. Against this background, the purpose of this article is to review research on key changes...
Article
This article analyzes how digital technology can shape cultural practice in Chinese online communities. By using the concepts of boundary and identity, it explores the formation of two online punk communities in China, created by those who are interested in punk music originating from Anglo-American countries. Drawing on data from participant obser...
Chapter
In: Toril Aalberg, Frank Esser, Carsten Reinemann, Jesper Stromback and Claes De Vreese (Eds), Populist Political Communication in Europe. Routledge.
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This article argues that in order to adequately comprehend and explain change, the field needs to engage more completely with the challenges of researching change over time, and ground the theorizing of change more firmly in empirical research. The goal of this article is to foster a more concerted discussion on these issues that will hopefully mov...
Chapter
Political scandals are an important and increasingly visible feature of political communication in democracies. This article starts by defining political scandals before exploring Thompson's typology of political scandal. It examines the many causes that underlie scandals, before looking at the role of journalists and the media as crucial actors in...
Article
This item was submitted for publication in the journal, Media, Culture and Society [SAGE Publications Ltd / © The Author(s)]. The definitive version is available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0163443715580761.
Chapter
On 4 July 2011, an ongoing British police investigation into the hacking of phones of prominent celebrities and politicians by the press revealed that a Sunday tabloid newspaper, the News of the World, had illegally accessed the voicemail on the mobile phone of a murdered London school girl, Milly Dowler. In the following days, public outrage grew...
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Mediatization is emerging as an influential new concept that places the media at the centre of all kinds of important cultural, political and social developments. However, it has so far attracted little critical evaluation. In this article the authors identify three areas of concern, namely, how causal processes are thought about, how historical ch...
Article
While there is growing research on online politics in China some political uses of the Internet have tended to be overlooked. The focus of this article is on an emerging phenomenon in Chinese cyberspace, the human flesh search engine (HFSE), a term first used by the Chinese media to refer to the practice of online searching for people or ‘human hun...
Chapter
There is a fine tradition of small-N comparative case-oriented research in the field of political communication and while work in this tradition has provided numerous important insights its explanatory power has often been hampered by a reliance on description and a lack of suitable alternative techniques for cross-case analysis. The aim of this ch...
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Over 30 years, a large body of research on what is often called ‘hard’ and ‘soft news’ has accumulated in communication studies. However, there is no consensus about what hard and soft news exactly is, or how it should be defined or measured. Moreover, the concept has not been clearly differentiated from or systematically related to concepts addres...
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Political sex scandals are largely absent in some democracies but proliferate in others. However, there have so far been few if any comprehensive attempts to document the actual number of sex scandals that have occurred and to explain their presence (and, indeed, absence), and the one study that has (Barker's 1994 study) ended in the early 1990s an...
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This study examines the supply of political information programming across thirteen European broadcast systems over three decades. The cross-national and crosstemporal design traces the composition and development of political information environments with regard to the amount and placement of news and current affairs programs on the largest public...
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Personalization has become a central concept in discussions on how political news, and election coverage in particular, has changed over time. The general belief is that the focus of news coverage has shifted from parties and organizations to candidates and leaders. However, the evidence is far from conclusive. This is due in no small part to a lac...
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This article explores interactive opportunities provided by British broadsheet and tabloid newspapers’ websites and the ways their readers make use of these opportunities to express their opinions. The article presents the results of both a quantitative and a qualitative analysis of national British broadsheet and tabloid newspaper websites. The re...
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This article examines the benefits of fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) for comparative media research. It shows the advantages of fuzzy set theoretic thinking in examining the causes of a major feature of contemporary political communication research, namely personalization. The article has three parts. The first is a critique of...
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This article examines the way politicians package themselves to their constituents via the Web. It looks at various aspects of online self-promotion by incumbent representatives in two advanced industrial democracies – the US and the UK. It seeks to ascertain the extent to which personal qualities are a key aspect of an elected representative's onl...
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Purpose – In light of the phenomenon of blogging in the 2004 US presidential campaign, this article aims to examine blogging during the 2005 British general election campaign. The article seeks to establish how widespread blogging was, the extent of bloggers' partisanship, what issues blogs were concerned with, what the purpose of the messages post...
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Purpose -In light of the phenomenon of blogging in the 2004 US presidential campaign, this article examines blogging during the 2005 British general election campaign. The article seeks to establish how widespread blogging was, the extent of bloggers' partisanship, what issues blogs were concerned with, what the purpose of the messages posted by th...
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This article argues that the use of the Internet by the main British political parties during the 2005 general election campaign needs to be understood in terms of the ongoing transformation of e-campaigning in the UK. Since the emergence of the World Wide Web in the mid-1990s the main political parties have been quick to try and exploit the new te...
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This article focuses on some of the key political communication events of 2003. It examines the government's effort to shape public opinion prior to the invasion of Iraq. It looks at how the media covered the war and the public's viewing habits during this period. The article then focuses on the government's relationship with the news media, lookin...
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The processes of economic liberalisation, democratisation, and technological change are radically transforming political communication around the world. In multi-party democracies political activity has increasingly come under the gaze of a plethora of media outlets that have been deregulated and largely freed from censorship and direct state contr...
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This article reexamines the formation of political news agendas on British television. It argues that studies on the formation of domestic political news agendas have so far largely been election campaign centered. Using the annual party political conventions in Britain as a case study, this article explores internal party struggles between the lea...
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This article focuses on some of the key events that shaped political communication during 2002. It examines the news media coverage of the Labour government and the extent to which that coverage was hostile and preoccupied with the behind‐the‐scenes activities of spin doctors. It looks at the government's response to such coverage and the media's r...
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Making sure political parties receive comprehensive and favourable media coverage is a full time activity that extends beyond the period of election campaigns. In the era of the permanent campaign the annual autumn conferences of the main British political parties represent a publicity opportunity. The undivided media coverage of these events provi...
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This article examines the media's coverage of political events during 2001 and audience's responses: It highlights the problems the media encountered, in particular increased pressure from party spin-doctors aimed at directing media reporting of events. This has further aggravated the relationship between the actors. The article focuses on the impa...
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This article examines the coverage of internal party debates by television news broadcasters. Based on an analysis of the British annual party political conferences, it focuses on the prominence given to internal party debates and the way in which such discussions are packaged and contextualised. It argues that news-hungry broadcasters, in a compet...
Article
This paper re-examines the formation of political news agendas on British television. It argues that studies of news agenda formation in political communication have been overly focused on general election campaigns and the competition between the main political parties to set the news agenda. It suggests that such studies see political parties as...
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There have been three the kev developments in the UK media environment during the year 2000: an intensification of competition for audiences; an ongoing consolidation of firms within the broadcasting and newspaper industries; and the increasing diversification of media corporations on to the internet, with millions of pounds invested in placing exi...
Thesis
Studies of political communication in the UK have focused primarily on election campaigns and reportage of parliamentary and public policy issues. In these contexts, two or more parties compete for coverage in the news media. However, the main British party conferences present a different context, where one party's activities form the (almost exclu...
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Since the mid-2000s, Britain’s political communication environment has undergone rapid change. During the 2010 election campaign, television continued its dominance as the most important medium through which the British public acquires its political information, as Britain’s first ever live televised party leaders’ debates received saturation cover...
Article
OPENING SUMMARY The news environment in advanced industrial democracies is undergoing a tremendous series of changes driven in a large part by the emergence, spread and evolution of the internet. The once ubiquitous scenario of a string of national, regional and local news outlets with largely captive audiences and secure revenue streams has fundam...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
The project examines how the current changes in the political information environments in European democracies affect the conditions for a healthy democracy. As a theoretical background, we employ the concept of ‘political information environment’ (PIE) that includes both the supply and demand of political news and information. Supply refers to the quantity and quality of news and public affairs content provided through traditional and new media sources, demand captures the amount and type of news and information the public wants or consumes. Recent changes in the political information environment may lead to a growing number of uninformed, misinformed, and selectively informed citizens, potentially endangering the functioning of democracy. To examine these concerns, the study aims at investigating the following: (1) How do citizens today gain political information and how does this relate to their political attitudes and behaviour? (2) What is the content and quality of the information citizens are exposed to? (3) Where do divides between being informed and not being informed exist, across and within European societies? (4) How can citizens be empowered to navigate and find valuable information? We will do this through a series of comparative, innovatively designed studies, including web tracking, comparative surveys, focus groups, and survey-embedded experiments in 14 European countries and the US. These countries vary on a number of key contextual factors relevant for the study, covering both “young” and established democracies with different democratic traditions, media systems, and news consumption habits. The THREATPIE project commences during 2020 and will run for 36 months. The project is financially supported by the NORFACE Joint Research Programme on Democratic Governance in a Turbulent Age and co-funded by FWO, DFF, ANR, DFG, NWO, NCN, AEI, and ESRC, and the European Commission through Horizon 2020 under grant agreement No 822166.
Project
To compare left- and right-wing parties in Greece and Germany. Specifically, the cases of Indepedent Greeks (ANEL), SYRIZA, Die Linke and AfD.