James Sedlacek

James Sedlacek
Nazarene Theological College at The University of Manchester · Biblical Studies

Doctor of Philosophy

About

6
Publications
17,994
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
0
Citations
Citations since 2016
2 Research Items
0 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220.00.20.40.60.81.0
20162017201820192020202120220.00.20.40.60.81.0
20162017201820192020202120220.00.20.40.60.81.0
20162017201820192020202120220.00.20.40.60.81.0
Introduction
I am keenly interested in verbal aspect of the Hellenistic Greek language. I am also interested in conditional clauses, prepositions, and exegesis.
Additional affiliations
September 2020 - present
Nazarene Theological College
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • I am teaching Introduction to New Testament Greek
July 2010 - July 2014
Cincinnati Christian Schools
Position
  • Bible Teacher
Description
  • I taught a full-time load for four years. My courses included New Testament Introduction and Survey, Comparative World Religions, Apologetics, Romans, James, Eschatology, and Church History: Reformation to Present.
July 2009 - May 2010
God's Bible School & College
Position
  • Adjunct Professor of New Testament Greek
Description
  • I taught Beginning New Testament Greek 1A and 1B.
Education
January 2014 - May 2014
Nazarene Theological College
Field of study
  • Biblical Studies
August 2005 - May 2010
Cincinnati Christian University
Field of study
  • Biblical Studies
August 2001 - October 2002
Liberty University
Field of study
  • Biblical Studies

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
Full-text available
This article presents an exegesis of Ephesians 4:1-6, 14-16. It first presents both the historical and literary contexts followed by an overview of the passage in the context of the letter as a whole. The main section of the article presents the text of the passage one phrase or clause at a time along with an analysis and interpretation of that phr...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper will provide an overview of verbal aspect theories within Biblical Studies and how they impact the understanding of the Greek Perfect tense-form in the New Testament. This paper will next examine one Perfect tense-form in context and then make connections to various theories in order explain these verbs. Attention will be given to words...
Conference Paper
The Greek Verb, οἶδα, has been misconstrued as being lexically stative only, and has been misunderstood as having no reference to a complete action which brought about its state due to its gloss of " knowing. " This paper reexamines the morphological components and draws comparisons from other languages within the same language family to show that...
Article
Full-text available
This paper will begin with an overview of the various forms of the Greek Perfect, including synthetic and periphrastic forms, along with the range of uses observed throughout the history of the language, while situating both the forms and usages to a timeline. The morphology of the Perfect will be compared to that of the Present and Aorist in order...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Abstract: This paper will assess the various changes to the understanding of the Greek Aorist indicative tense-form brought about by the increasing interest in verbal aspect. This paper will also indicate several theories regarding the meaning and use of Greek Aorist tense-forms that incorporate these changes. This paper will begin with the shift f...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper is a reworked chapter from my M.Div. thesis that applies the Broad Dialogue Model developed in the first three chapters to answer the question, "Who or What is the Leviathan in Job 41?"

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I am familiar with TLG and the Perseus Digital Project.  I want to do corpus linguistics on Hellenistic Greek.  Some of the things I need to do is search by POS, search by Lemma, search by morphological element (reduplication, particular morpheme, stem formation, etc.) and search for collocates. 
I am not sure either of the above will do all of that. I am considering developing my own corpora and using a tagger that does all of this to the corpora, as well as a search engine that will recognize what I tagged. 
Do I need to do this, or is there already a selection of tools that will get the job done?