James Ivan Scrase

James Ivan Scrase
The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds · Conservation Policy

PhD

About

29
Publications
9,800
Reads
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936
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2006 - November 2009
University of Sussex
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (29)
Article
This paper seeks to provide an accessible introduction to the relevance to energy policy of a fundamental insight from the policy sciences. This concerns the role that the linguistic framing of policy problems and solutions can play in sustaining the dominance of existing policy positions. The paper introduces a discourse perspective to understandi...
Article
Whilst not originating in political analysis, a transitions problem framing nevertheless provides a heuristic for understanding certain features of climate politics. A multi-level perspective on transitions to low carbon socio-technical regimes is introduced, and illustrated through the example of electricity supply. An associated ‘transition manag...
Article
Full-text available
This paper provides details of the context and background to UK policies for CCS, and critically examines the national strategy and detailed initiatives to date. Interviews with key players inform the analysis. Climate and energy security goals are first set out, and arguments about the place of coal within them discussed. Then the paper turns to t...
Chapter
Harnessing renewable energy and using energy efficiently are not new ideas. Burning wood, using sails and drying food in the sun are as old as civilisation itself. Using modern technological approaches to reduce fossil fuel use is a relatively modern concern, dating from the first oil crisis of the early 1970s. By the late 1980s a range of modern t...
Chapter
In this chapter the argument is that moving towards low carbon, sustainable energy use will require a critical look at the framing of energy policy. ‘Framing’ here means the assumptions made, and the ways in which policy debates ‘construct’, emphasise and link particular issues. For example, energy ‘security of supply’ is often emphasised in argume...
Chapter
Around the world energy policy is becoming more politically heated. An interrelated set of factors explains this: new scientific findings about climate change and its likely consequences; rising energy prices; controversy about nuclear ambitions; fears about the security of fossil fuel supplies relating to short-term geopolitical instabilities; rap...
Chapter
Rapidly cutting domestic GHG emissions is the most pressing energy policy challenge in industrialised countries, but it is global emissions, including those from developing countries, that will determine the extent of future climate change. Agreement on global action to cut emissions has so far been difficult to achieve, largely because of US intra...
Chapter
Avoiding dangerous climate change is the defining challenge for humanity in the twenty-first century. Since the energy system is both the primary cause of climate change and the primary means of mitigation, the future evolution of energy policy is of critical importance. But energy policy is undergoing significant change for other reasons, includin...
Chapter
Over 20 years ago UN Commission on Environment and Development called on governments around the world to make sustainable development their first priority. The ‘Brundtland Report’ provided a definition still regularly quoted in policy documents committing governments to the aim. Sustainable development is: [D]evelopment that meets the needs of the...
Article
Full-text available
Traditionally floods have been understood to be acts of God or nature, with localised impacts afflicting those who choose to live or to invest capital in lowland and coastal locations. This central idea of causation, located outside human agency, survives somewhat precariously today, but is reflected in the lack of any right to protection from floo...
Article
In sub-Saharan Africa available evidence suggests that biomass use for energy has increased roughly in proportion to population growth. With urbanization the biomass energy sector is becoming more commercialized, and consumption of charcoal is increasing (which leads to higher biomass consumption, given the low conversion efficiencies in most charc...
Article
Full-text available
Integration and integrated approaches are increasingly presented as new and superior ways to consider the environment in policy- and decision-making. If used in an uncritical way, this assertion could become a hindrance to good practice and could undermine efforts to defend or improve environmental quality. The aim of this paper is to provide the m...
Article
The rate of growth in UK commercial energy consumption since the early 1970s has been approximately three times greater than in the domestic sector. Consumption is projected to continue growing faster than in all other sectors except transport. Increasing floor space has been accompanied by rising energy intensity in many commercial buildings. In t...
Article
The paper describes results of the BioCosts project in which a comprehensive analysis of the economic and environmental performance of the energy use of biomass was carried out for selected existing facilities throughout the European Union. It is demonstrated that the appropriately organized use of biofuels has significant environmental advantages...
Article
Many influential organisations foresee biomass playing a key role in a future, more sustainable, global energy supply matrix. Countries such as Austria, Brazil, Denmark, Finland, Sweden, India, the USA and the UK are actively encouraging the use of biomass for energy, and pushing forward the development of the necessary knowledge and technology for...

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