James A. Robertson

James A. Robertson
United States Department of Agriculture | USDA · USDA APHIS National Identification Services

PhD

About

38
Publications
38,082
Reads
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1,091
Citations
Citations since 2016
18 Research Items
954 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
Additional affiliations
September 2017 - present
United States Department of Agriculture
Position
  • Molecular Systematist
September 2010 - July 2017
The University of Arizona
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (38)
Article
Full-text available
Ant-nest beetles (Paussus) are the quintessential Trojan horses of the insect world. They hack the complex communication system of ants, allowing them to blend into the ant society and be treated as royalty, all the while preying upon the ants and the ants’ brood and duping the ants into rearing their young []. Here we present results of the first...
Article
Full-text available
A large-scale phylogenetic study is presented for Cucujoidea (Coleoptera), a diverse superfamily of beetles that historically has been taxonomically difficult. This study is the most comprehensive analysis of cucujoid taxa to date, with DNA sequence data sampled from eight genes (four nuclear, four mitochondrial) for 384 coleopteran taxa, including...
Article
Full-text available
Ant nest beetles (Paussus L.) are ecologically fascinating and phenotypically bizarre. Obligate myrmecophiles, Paussus have undergone extreme adaptations for life with ants and their profound range of phenotypic diversity has been difficult to reconcile in a systematic framework. We conducted a detailed morphological study of Paussus utilizing nove...
Article
Full-text available
Stick and leaf insects (Phasmatodea) are large, tropical, predominantly nocturnal herbivores, which exhibit extreme masquerade crypsis, whereby they morphologically and behaviorally resemble twigs, bark, lichen, moss, and leaves. Females employ a wide range of egg-laying techniques, largely corresponding to their ecological niche, including droppin...
Article
Full-text available
The family Cerasommatidiidae was proposed by Brèthes in 1925 for his new genus Cerasommatidia from Brazil, described as an intermediate taxon between Endomychidae and Coccinellidae (Coccinelloidea). This group was neglected for decades until 1994 when the resemblance of Cerasommatidia with the eupsilobiine genus Ibicarella was noticed, and Cerasomm...
Article
Carposina ottawana Kearfott, 1907 (Lepidoptera: Carposinidae), revised status, formerly considered a synonym of C. sasakii Matsumura, 1900, is returned to species status. Morphological features that separate the Asian species C. sasakii and C. niponensis Walsingham, 1900 from the North American C. ottawana are described and illustrated. A heuristic...
Article
Full-text available
Endemic to the Palaeotropic and southern Palaearctic regions, ant nest beetles (Carabidae: Paussus ) are specialized predators that depend on ants for their survival. This obligate relationship has driven extreme morphological adaptations that obscured our understanding of Paussus species relationships and subgeneric clades for centuries. Molecular...
Conference Paper
Members of the carabid subfamily Paussinae (flanged bombardier beetles) are famous for their explosive defensive chemistry and symbiotic life histories with ants. Among paussines, the genus Paussus is most diverse, with ~340 described species distributed in the tropical regions of the Old World. The species diversity within this charismatic genus i...
Article
Full-text available
Of all the superfamilies within the megadiverse order Coleoptera (Insecta), Cucujoidea (Cucujiformia) is arguably the most problematic taxonomically. The families comprising Cucujidae s.l. (Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae, Passandridae and Cucujidae s.s. represent a large portion of cucujoid diversity. Herein we present the results of a rigorous molecul...
Article
Full-text available
Stridulatory organs in the myrmecophilous carabid beetle tribe Paussini have long been recognized and used as a defining character of some genera and higher level taxa, however their morphology has only roughly been described. Here, we describe the fine morphology of Paussini stridulatory organs using scanning electron (SEM) and focused ion beam (F...
Article
The phasmatodeans or stick and leaf insects are considered to be a mesodiverse insect order with more than 3000 species reported mainly from the tropics. The stick insect subfamily Necrosciinae comprises approximately 700 described species in more than 60 genera from the Oriental and Australian region, forming the most species-rich subfamily tradit...
Conference Paper
Using four mitochondrial genes (12S, 16S, COI, & COII) and three nuclear genes (18S, 28S & H3) we tested the monophyly and sister-group relationships of ten different beetle families currently included in the superfamily Cucujoidea. This analysis included eighty Old and New World taxa focusing heavily on the Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae, and traditio...
Article
Eight genes (nuclear: 18S, 28S, H3, CAD; mitochondrial: 12S, 16S, COI, COII) and morphology were used to infer the evolutionary history of Corylophidae, some of the smallest free‐living insects. The study included 36 corylophid exemplars, representing approximately 60% of the known generic diversity of the family and 16 cucujoid outgroup taxa. Mult...
Conference Paper
Among the charismatic, flanged bombardier beetles (Carabidae: Paussinae), the genus Paussus is most diverse, with ~340 described species distributed in the tropical regions of the Old World. The species diversity within this genus is reflected in an astounding breadth of morphological diversity. Phylogenetic relationships within Paussus have been...
Conference Paper
Phylogenetic relationships within the diverse beetle superfamily Cucujoidea are poorly known. The Cerylonid Series (CS) is the largest of all proposed superfamilial cucujoid groups, comprising eight families and representing most of the known cucujoid species diversity. Historical classification and biology of major CS taxa are briefly reviewed. Re...
Conference Paper
Molecular sequence data from 8 genes representing nuclear ribosomal (18S, 28S), nuclear protein-coding (wingless, H3), mitochondrial ribosomal (12S, 16S) and mitochondrial protein-coding (COI, COII) genes were used to reconstruct a phylogenetic hypothesis for the family Endomychidae. Parsimony, likelihood and Bayesian analyses of taxa representing...
Conference Paper
Phylogenetic relationships within the diverse beetle superfamily Cucujoidea are poorly known. The Cerylonid Series (CS) is the largest of all proposed superfamilial cucujoid groups, comprising eight families and representing most of the known cucujoid species diversity. Recent molecular hypotheses of CS phylogeny (Hunt et al., 2007; Robertson et al...
Article
Phylogenetic relationships within the diverse beetle superfamily Cucujoidea are poorly known. The Cerylonid Series (C.S.) is the largest of all proposed superfamilial cucujoid groups, comprising eight families and representing most of the known cucujoid species diversity. The monophyly of the C.S., however, has never been formally tested and the hi...
Article
  Phylogenetic relationships of Erotylidae (pleasing fungus beetles) were inferred based on DNA sequence data. Relationships of clades within Erotylidae were examined, as was the relationship of the entire family to Languriidae (lizard beetles). 18S and 28S ribosomal DNA were sequenced for sixty-one taxa representing major erotylid lineages and out...

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