James Randall

James Randall
South West Yorkshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust | SWYT · CAMHS & Social Care

Doctor of Psychology
Cognitive Analytic Therapy, Systemic, CBT.

About

30
Publications
12,542
Reads
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39
Citations

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Full-text available
In writing, I wish to make a personal commitment to participating in dialogues about difference through using the social graces, with particular reference to Sophie Cockell’s graceful exploration of ‘appearance’ in her paper entitled Exploration of Attire as an Unvoiced ‘GRACE’ (2017). I write in my final year of training as a clinical psychologist...
Book
This vital new book navigates the personal, professional and political selves on the journey to training in clinical psychology. Readers will be able to explore a range of ways to enrich their practice through a focus on identities and differences, relationships and power within organisations, supervisory contexts, therapeutic conventions and commu...
Article
With ongoing news of hardship and suffering in the United Kingdom and throughout the world, and in the context of austerity, shrinking public services and increasing social inequalities, it is sometimes difficult not to fall into despair, to feel hopeless or ineffectual. In this paper we consider counter‐practices to such despair and hopelessness t...
Article
Full-text available
There was a bittersweet reassurance in reading the words of Jacy Young and Peter Hegarty writing on #PsychToo (Young & Hegarty, 2020): a naming, validation, and visibility, yet something so irrevocably rotten in psychology. We wrote a draft of a similar nature entitled “we need to talk about clinical psychology’s #MeToo” for a recent book we both w...
Article
Full-text available
Muscular dystrophy is a terminal muscle-wasting condition, whereby families face continuous challenges as their child's health deteriorates. This research explored accounts of parenthood following bereavement of their child to muscular dystrophy. Narrative inquiry was used to analyse interviews with four couples. Findings suggest an importance in n...
Article
Full-text available
Research enables us to attempt to understand the incomprehensible. In doing so, we collaborate with others – facilitating a context to communicate. Our dialogues gather up the complexity of what it means to have lived particular lives or to have had particular experiences over time. Ultimately, research aids our connection to others and leads us to...
Chapter
As we embark on our professional journeys, our roads are fraught by questions and perplexities. In clinical practice, it is often the supervisory relationship that can offer a containing space for such uncertainties and confusions to be voiced. With the goal of learning from such complex situations through the questioning and guidance of another, i...
Chapter
Completing clinical psychology training can be both daunting and rewarding. This chapter provides an overview of some of the challenges trainees may face on their journey, whilst offering the reader ideas on how to consolidate their academic, clinical and research skills to support their own personal and professional development. It provides some p...
Chapter
The ways in which we tell our stories matter. For clinical psychology within the UK, the journey to clinical training is unclear and confusing for many – with no clear pathway to qualification. The social context for aspiring clinical psychologists then, is not only characterised by uncertainty but can fuel individualistic notions of competition an...
Article
Full-text available
“What dreams may come when we have shuffled off this mortal coil?” This question, posed by Shakespeare’s Hamlet, kept coming to mind for James whilst he completed his doctorate research project that looked at the ways in which bereaved couples storied their experiences of parenting a child with muscular dystrophy. What seemed imperative to this exp...
Article
Full-text available
A week-long outdoor project was held for young people, informed by a narrative therapy approach. This project aimed to offer and explore a non-traditional therapeutic space in CAMHS. Semi-structured interviews highlighted the importance of creativity and meaningful collaboration with young people and community organisations.
Poster
In 2015, the University of Hertfordshire was approached by The Muscle Help Foundation to evaluate the impact of the Muscle Dream experiences they offer to young people with a diagnosis of Muscular Dystrophy (and other muscle wasting conditions) and their families. Here we report on the findings of the research.
Article
Background: The British Psychological Society proposes that clinical psychologists are well placed to move beyond psychiatric diagnoses and develop alternative practices. Aims: This study sought to explore what the application of these guiding principles looks like in clinical practice, the challenges faced and possible routes forward. Methods: A p...
Article
This paper describes a systemic exercise for clinical staff facing multiple changes to team structure and threats to their sense of belonging. The exercise was adapted from a consultation intervention that addressed a team's resourcefulness in responding to behaviours that challenge in intellectual disabilities (Smyly, 2006). As clinical psychology...
Technical Report
The Muscle Help Foundation (MHF) aims to deliver 657 Muscle Dreams to young people with a diagnosis of Muscular Dystrophy, which is one life- changing experience for every muscle in the human body. As of November 2016, 239 Muscle Dreams have been fulfilled. This report is a retrospective evaluation of the impact of Muscle Dreams
Article
Full-text available
This article reflects on the past and present of the clinical psychology doctorate training programme, and looks ahead to the future in the context of the changes within the wider NHS.
Article
Full-text available
Substance misuse in older adult populations is a significant social and health issue. This area requires urgent attention from researchers, clinicians, commissioners, and society as a whole. This article provides a discussion of the literature and important aspects of clinical practice.
Technical Report
Full-text available
There may be a significant amount of undiagnosed cognitive impairment in older people (aged 55 and over) attending substance misuse services. Cognitive impairment screening in substance misuse services is acceptable to older service users. Cognitive impairment can make it difficult for older people to benefit fully from alcohol treatment but treatm...
Article
Full-text available
Formulating in teams is an ideal platform for influencing psychological thinking positively. Pre-qualified members may be well placed to develop these groups, under supervision. Here, we explore the possibilities and challenges for developing team-based formulation groups.
Article
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore current practice, barriers and facilitators to identifying and responding to alcohol problems in memory clinics. Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire sent to professionals in 55 memory clinics in England, Wales and the Isle of Wight and two focus groups with professionals from three memory...
Article
Objective: Alcohol misuse can coexist with and/or contribute to the development of cognitive impairment in the older adult population but continues to be underestimated and undetected in older people. This study aimed to examine the feasibility and acceptability of routine screening for alcohol misuse in a small sample of older people with cogniti...

Network

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Projects

Projects (10)
Project
Learning from parents about continuing living after the loss of a child and about continuing parenting through grief
Archived project
Surviving Clinical Psychology offers a unique collection of papers addressing issues of interest to pre-qualified psychologists and researchers, and those mentoring early-career practitioners. This book invites the reader to reflect on their development - navigating the personal, professional and political selves on the journey to training in clinical psychology. Through critical discussion, practice examples, shared accounts, and exercises, individuals will be invited to reflect on a range of topical issues in clinical psychology. Readers will be able to explore a range of ways to enrich their practice through a focus on identities and difference, relationships and power within organisations, therapeutic conventions and community approaches, supervisory contexts, and an exploration of personal experiences, including self-formulation, personal therapy and reflections on using services. Voices often marginalized within the profession, write side-by-side with those more established in the field – offering a unique perspective on the issues faced in navigating clinical training and the profession more broadly. Surviving Clinical Psychology invites those early-on in their careers in psychological services to link ‘the political’ to personal and professional development in a way that is creative, critical and values-based. This fresh look at the experiences of those embarking upon clinical training will also be of interest to academics and researchers involved in clinical training, clinical supervisors, and mentors and advocates for pre-qualified clinicians.
Project
Surviving Clinical Psychology offers a unique collection of papers addressing issues of interest to pre-qualified psychologists and researchers, and those mentoring early-career practitioners.