James Newland

James Newland
University of Houston | U of H, UH · Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Master of Science
Researching computational thinking in secondary science teaching and authentic research in teaching and learning

About

14
Publications
1,546
Reads
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1
Citation
Citations since 2017
14 Research Items
1 Citation
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Introduction
Studying effects of computational thinking on teaching and learning physics and astronomy and how authentic research affects science learning for teachers and students.
Additional affiliations
June 2019 - July 2019
Rice University
Position
  • Research Intern
Description
  • Expeditions in Computing research intern in health parameter analysis using remote photoplethysmography.
June 2019 - December 2019
University of Texas at Austin
Position
  • Research Intern
Description
  • Research intern for Dr. Chris Sneden in stellar metallicities via high resolution spectroscopy at McDonald Observatory, Otto Struve 2.1m telescope using Sandiford Echelle Spectrograph.
June 2018 - July 2018
Rice University
Position
  • Research Intern
Description
  • Expeditions in Computing research intern in health parameter analysis using pulse sensor technology and coding.
Education
August 2019 - May 2023
University of Houston
Field of study
  • Physics Education
September 1995 - December 1999
University of Houston
Field of study
  • Physics Education
August 1991 - May 1995
Mississippi State University
Field of study
  • Physics and Astronomy

Publications

Publications (14)
Poster
Full-text available
http://www.jimmynewland.com/wp/about-jimmy/presentations/comparing-ppg-signals-open-vs-closed/
Preprint
Full-text available
Commercial pulse oximeters often use proprietary data acquisition and visualization techniques, making it difficult to perform digital signal processing on waveform data. Careful, detailed analysis is critical when using the photoplethysmogram (PPG) for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Open hardware and software systems offer full access the PP...
Article
Full-text available
This short piece is currently under review for inclusion in the Research Notes of the American Astronomical Society. The research note is associated with the poster I presented at the AAS #236 summer meeting.
Poster
Full-text available
In the summer of 2019, four science teachers, members of the EXES Teacher Affiliate program of the University of Texas at Austin, participated in a week-long session at McDonald Observatory, Ft. Davis, Texas. The purpose of this research was two-fold: to give teachers the experience of collecting data using the 2.1-meter Otto Struve Telescope and t...
Poster
Full-text available
Physics engines in video games often employ non-physical behaviors for the sake of game play. Introductory physics students can use computational modeling to determine the underlying relationships for objects in game play videos and even create accurate physical models for comparison. This activity takes advantage of computational thinking to furth...
Presentation
Full-text available
This presentation for CAST 2022 in Dallas discusses how computational thinking practices can impact physics learning when students write computer programming code to model air drag. The model produces data that students use to compare the results of a direct video measurement activity about air drag. The datasets are then analyzed using a Google No...
Method
Full-text available
The Computational Thinking in Science Attitude Scale is a 15-question survey using a 5- point Likert-type scale. Students will complete the teacher-designed activities throughout the semester. The goal is to probe knowledge and attitudes about computational thinking for students completing computational activities in physics class. The hypothesis i...
Presentation
Full-text available
How can we integrate computational thinking into science classes while at the same time addressing remote learning? Hear about remote astronomy labs using coding and data science techniques that can be completed asynchronously. By leveraging computing pedagogy and using authentic data, students develop knowledge about science and computer science t...
Presentation
Full-text available
Presenters will share their experience working on a Stellar Spectroscopy Research Project using the 2.1 meter Otto Struve telescope at McDonald Observatory, TX, which has greatly affected their classroom teaching and their students’ understanding of the nature of science. Attendees will be guided through a spectroscopy lesson suitable for 8th-12th...
Poster
Full-text available
Remote lab work in high school astronomy classes can be a good place to integrate computational thinking when the concepts are scaffolded. Data visualization and common computational algorithms can enhance virtual work for both individuals and groups in the high school astronomy course. Here we explore some Python-based data-driven labs and labs us...
Poster
Full-text available
Bringing computational thinking into the science classroom is more important than ever. Here we look at a series of web-based astronomy lab activities that use modern computing and data science paradigms to process authentic datasets that ask students to investigate underlying phenomena using inquiry and exploration. These activities work when stud...
Presentation
Full-text available
This poster session will provide an overview of a two-summer research experience for teachers at Rice University and its results for AP Physics classroom instruction.
Presentation
Full-text available
One of the most effective ways for a science teacher to know what and how to incorporate science research skills into class is to do some actual scientific research! We will discuss a summer research program in astronomy and ways that program affects the classroom. Come learn about some resources to seek a research experience of your own.
Poster
Full-text available
A webcam can read a pulse nearly as well as a finger pulse sensor. Real-time remote photoplethysmography using a webcam and graphical user interface.

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
This work is part of my 2019 summer research internship at Rice University in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering in partnership with the Rice Office of STEM Engagement. Abstract: The pulse is an important vital sign that gives the medical state of a person. Access to affordable and reliable ways to measure vital signs is a struggle for many underserved communities. One solution is to create methods of measuring a pulse, or photoplethysmogram (ppg), using a camera from an existing device, like a smartphone or laptop. In this way, patients can connect to care-givers using telemedicine and their currently available devices. Telemedicine means patients can have remote access to care-givers in a more flexible way than traditional treatment pathways. Many devices exist for obtaining a ppg such as a pulse oximeter, but these devices require contact with the patient and are not easily integrated into telemedicine systems. The remote ppg technique allows for real-time analysis of the pulse using only a webcam. The remote ppg algorithm implemented here uses a user-selectable region of interest (roi) for which an intensity time-series is obtained. This project demonstrates a graphical user interface running on a computer for obtaining, analyzing, and visualizing the ppg waveform in real-time. Live signals of the remote ppg and a traditional pulse sensor are compared for ground truth analysis. The OpenCV and PyQtGraph packages in Python were used to create a relatively simple and robust way to obtain, analyze, and visualize the ppg in an engaging and accessible format which could be run locally or remotely. Future work would have the algorithm track the roi as the person moves in the frame.