James G. Napoli

James G. Napoli
American Museum of Natural History · Richard Gilder Graduate School

Doctor of Philosophy

About

17
Publications
3,463
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49
Citations
Introduction
PhD student at the Richard Gilder Graduate School of the American Museum of Natural History. Interested in vertebrate evolution (particularly mammals and reptiles), systematics, morphological variation, and paleobiology.

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
The involvement of mineralized tissues in acid–base homeostasis was likely important in the evolution of terrestrial vertebrates. Extant reptiles encounter hypercapnia when submerged in water, but early tetrapods may have experienced hypercapnia on land due to their inefficient mode of lung ventilation (likely buccal pumping, as in extant amphibian...
Article
Full-text available
Eutherian mammals—placentals and their closest extinct relatives—underwent a major radiation following the end-Cretaceous extinction, during which they evolved disparate anatomy and established new terrestrial ecosystems. Much about the timing, pace, and causes of this radiation remain unclear, in large part because we still know very little about...
Article
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The Late Cretaceous dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex was recently split into three species based on the premise that variation in the T. rex hypodigm is exceptional, indicating cryptic species and “robust” and “gracile” morphs. The morphs are based on proportional ratios throughout the skeleton. The species are claimed to be stratigraphically separate, w...
Article
Background: Unilateral coronal craniosynostosis (UCS) is a congenital disorder resulting from the premature suture fusion, leading to complex primary and compensatory morphologic changes in the shape of not only the calvarium and but also into the skull base. This deformity typically requires surgery to correct the shape of the skull and prevent n...
Article
Full-text available
Dromaeosaurid theropods represent a rare but important clade of nonavialan dinosaurs. Their close evolutionary relationship to modern birds has placed them at the center of paleonto-logical research for the last several decades. Herein we describe a new species of dromaeosaurid-Kuru kulla, gen. et sp. nov.-based on a partial skeleton from the Late...
Article
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Generally, the species is considered to be the only naturally occurring taxon. However, species recognised and defined using different species delimitation criteria cannot readily be compared, impacting studies of biodiversity through Deep Time. This comparability issue is particularly marked when comparing extant with extinct species, because the...
Article
Generally, the species is considered to be the only naturally occurring taxon. However, species recognised and defined using different species delimitation criteria cannot readily be compared, impacting studies of biodiversity through Deep Time. This comparability issue is particularly marked when comparing extant with extinct species, because the...
Article
Introduction: Geometric morphometrics (GM) is an advanced landmark-based quantitative method used to study biological shape and form. Historically, GM has been limited to non-biomedical fields such as comparative biology; however, this technique confers advantages over traditional cephalometric methods, warranting a review of current applications...
Article
Background: Geometric morphometric analysis with Procrustes superimposition is a commonly used method to characterize and study complex dysmorphology. The present study employs an advanced Procrustes-based approach to studying craniofacial dysmorphology in unilateral coronal synostosis and quantitatively describe bony patterns in this disorder, in...
Article
Full-text available
Sthenurine kangaroos, extinct “giant kangaroos” known predominantly from the Plio-Pleistocene, have been proposed to have used bipedal striding as a mode of locomotion, based on the morphology of their hind limbs. However, sthenurine forelimb morphology has not been considered in this context, and has important bearing as to whether these kangaroos...
Article
Background: Geometric morphometric analysis with Procrustes superimposition is an advanced computational tool that can be used to quantify dynamic changes in complex three-dimensional structures. The present study couples high resolution CT imaging with a Geometric Morphometric approach in order to further understand the complex dysmorphology that...

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