James L Guth

James L Guth
Furman University · Department of Politics and International Affairs

Doctor of Philosophy in Political Science

About

165
Publications
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2,862
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September 1973 - November 2019
Furman University
Position
  • Professor

Publications

Publications (165)
Conference Paper
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In this article, we examine the role of religion in producing support for the European Union and the integration process. We review the different confessional visions of Europe as a political entity and then summarize the findings of empirical research on the impact of religious factors on public support for the EU. Early empirical studies discover...
Conference Paper
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Catholics have long been an important force in American electoral politics, but the direction of their influence has steadily changed in recent decades. Once a mainstay of the Democratic New Deal coalition, Catholics have shifted their political loyalties away from the Democratic party to more of a political equilibrium, with white Catholics drifti...
Conference Paper
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Here we explore religious constituencies for the “Trump Doctrine’s” distinctive blend of nationalism, militarism and unilateralism. The question of religious support for the “Doctrine” is especially intriguing. Not only did the former president’s policies deviate markedly from traditional Republican norms, but he appealed vigorously for backing fro...
Article
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Scholars of American electoral politics have documented the recent partisan realignment of religious groups. Indeed, careful analysts often find that religious variables are better predictors of partisan choice than classic socioeconomic divisions. Still, there has been relatively little effort to put this religious realignment in both theoretical...
Article
Given their strategic position within American society, clergy continue to remain important actors in American politics. This article examines the partisan identifications and electoral behavior of American Protestant clergy in the 2016 presidential election. Although clergy partisanship may be of interest in any election, the 2016 contest, given t...
Conference Paper
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In previous work on the 2016 American presidential election, we found distinctive religious contributions to the “Populist Syndrome,” an attitudinal complex comprising support for strong leaders, “rough politics,” nativism, white nationalism, and other populist themes (Guth 2019). All these emphases echoed strongly among white evangelical Protestan...
Article
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Recent popular and scholarly literature on American religious politics has often focused on the phenomenon of Christian nationalism, but there has been little attention to the role of religious professionals in promulgating this ideology. This article assesses the prevalence of Christian nationalist ideas among clergy in ten evangelical and mainlin...
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We use the 2019 European Parliamentary Election Study to examine contemporary party cleavages in Europe. We find that party cleavages are quite complex, influenced by historic social class and economic divisions, religious factors, postmaterial values, and evaluation of national and European political institutions. The classic left/right ideologica...
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This paper explores the changing role of religion in forming public attitudes toward integration. We first outline the complex relationship of religion to the development of the European Union, and then use the 2009 and 2014 European Parliamentary Election Studies to examine the changes taking place in those historic patterns. In 2009 traditional r...
Conference Paper
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One of the frontiers of public deliberation on religious freedom involves the rights of religious conscience when pitted against generally applicable government rules against discrimination. As state and federal courts consider specific issues pitting religious believers against other groups, especially LGBT Americans (and often state and federal g...
Article
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The role of religion in the rise of populism is sometimes contested, but usually neglected. In this article, we consider the question of whether white American Evangelicals are part of the populist movement. Using the American National Election Study of 2016, we demonstrate that Evangelicals share almost all of the central traits of “populists” pos...
Article
Does the rise of populist parties of the right and left indicate the fading of the traditional left–right cleavage and the rise of a new transnational cleavage? Our analysis finds evidence of a continued left–right cleavage that divides European parties by religion and class. Our analysis also finds strong evidence for an additional transnational c...
Article
God’s Country: Christian Zionism in America. By Samuel Goldman. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2018. 248p. $34.95 cloth. - Volume 17 Issue 2 - James L. Guth
Conference Paper
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This paper considers whether American Evangelicals represent a "populist" political constituency. Using data from the 2016 American National Election Study, the analysis shows that on almost all the putative attitudinal traits of populists, Evangelicals exceed other ethnoreligious groups, a finding confirmed by creation of a "Populist Syndrome" var...
Conference Paper
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The “return to religion” in international relations has stimulated interest in how religion shapes public attitudes toward foreign policy, one of the channels through which religion may influence a nation’s foreign policy. In the American case, most analysis has focused on the militarism of Evangelical Protestants, but some work reveals the distinc...
Conference Paper
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This paper examines the electoral choices and activism of Protestant clergy from ten denominations in the presidential election of 2016. We find the clerical "two-party" system still characterizes those choices and activities, albeit with some interesting deviations from past patterns and considerable variation from denomination to denomination.
Conference Paper
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The “return to religion” in international relations has stimulated interest in how religion shapes public attitudes toward foreign policy, including use of military force. In the American case, most analysis has focused on the militarism of Evangelical Protestants, but some work shows the distinctive views of other groups, supporting a more compreh...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Scholars of electoral politics in the United States have documented the recent partisan realignment of religious groups. Indeed, careful analysts often find that religious variables are better predictors of partisan choice than classic socioeconomic divisions. Still, there has been relatively little effort to put this religious realignment in both...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The “return to religion” in international relations has stimulated interest in how religion shapes public attitudes toward foreign policy, including use of military force. In the American case, most analysis has focused on the militarism of Evangelical Protestants (Baker, Hurwitz and Nelson 2008; Page and Bouton 2006; Baumgartner, Francia, and Morr...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Scholars of religious politics in the United States have documented the recent partisan realignment of American religious groups. Indeed, careful scholars find that religious variables are often better predictors of partisan choice than traditional socioeconomic divisions. Still, there has been relatively little effort to put these changes in both...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper considers the role of religion, social class, economic insecurity, and value conflicts in the rise of right-wing Populist and new Left parties in the European Union. Although the Populists and new Left share some common features, such as youth, lower levels of education, economic adversity, and critical perceptions toward existing social...
Conference Paper
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The decision of British voters in June 2016 to leave the European Union (EU) surprised many analysts, despite the uncertainty haunting the last polls before the referendum. Although there have been several scholarly efforts to parse public attitudes before the vote and a number of postmortem analyses, we still do not have a full picture of the forc...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The decision of British voters in June 2016 to leave the European Union (EU) surprised many analysts, despite the uncertainty haunting the last polls before the referendum. Although there have been several scholarly efforts to parse public attitudes before the vote and a number of postmortem analyses, we still do not have a full picture of the forc...
Article
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This article examines Protestant Euroscepticism in its purest form by focusing on the apocalyptic narratives of conservative Protestant dispensationalists in the UK, Scandinavia and the Netherlands. It estimates the numbers of end-times Eurosceptics, summarizes their apocalyptic narrative, traces its lineage to the Reformation, and explores its use...
Article
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Although there has been much speculation about the way that religion shapes American attitudes on foreign policy, there are few empirical analyses of that influence. This paper draws on a large national sample of the public in 2008 to classify religious groups on Eugene Wittkopf’s (1990) classic dimensions of foreign policy attitudes, militant inte...
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Does religion affect legislators’ behavior on environmental policy in the US? Studies of environmental policy making have not examined this question, although the literature suggests that religion might affect legislative behavior on environmental policy. This study examines the relationship between US House members’ religion and roll-call voting o...
Conference Paper
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In this paper we demonstrate that European identity is influenced by religious affiliation and devotion, in addition to the economic and demographic factors usually emphasized by analysts. We find that devout Catholics are much more likely to identity as "European" than are Protestants or members of other religious traditions. We suggest that decli...
Conference Paper
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From the very beginning, theorists of European economic and political integration knew that ordinary citizens would be crucial to the construction of their ultimate objective: a new supranational identity, undergirding a united continent. National leaders might develop a deep mutual sense of community through constant interaction and meaningful exc...
Article
Although there has been a surge of scholarship on the role of religion in American electoral politics, there has been much less analysis of its influence over the behaviour of public officials, such as national legislators. In this study, I review the literature on religion in the Congress, noting the limitations of that research, primarily its fai...
Chapter
Recent deliberations on a new farm, food, and rural development bill in the House Agriculture Committee involved Scriptural exegesis: At both committee meetings, debate over the food stamp cuts was heated, with defenders of the program saying that the bills would take food out of the mouths of children and the elderly. In the House, the discussion...
Article
Full-text available
Catholics have long been an important force in American electoral politics. Once a vital and loyal component of the New Deal Democratic coalition, Catholics in recent decades have shifted their political loyalties away from the Democratic Party to more of a partisan equilibrium. Indeed, by 2012, the White Catholic vote had become predominantly Repu...
Article
Recent literature in the religion and politics area has focused on the effect of various measures of religious affiliation on the political behavior of the mass public. Here we add to the evolving literature examining the influence of religious orientation on political elite behavior, focusing on the U.S. House of Representatives. Method. We use da...
Article
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Religion has always played a major role in American politics. Although the tides of electoral politics may often turn on economic events, foreign policy crises or other “secular” issues, partisan coalitions in the past few decades have been structured by religious alliances that have been extraordinarily stable, with only marginal changes from elec...
Article
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One core element of American exceptionalism has always been public support for a “special” American role in the world. This view has religious underpinnings, but scholars have variously stressed the influence of religious affiliation, of certain beliefs or behavior, or of generalized “civil religion”; empirical research has been lacking to clarify...
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In this article, we add to the evolving literature examining the importance of religious orientation and political elite behavior. We use data on the religious affiliations of United States House of Representative members to test the influence of religion on military funding for the “War on Terror.” Our findings indicate that, even after controllin...
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This paper delineates the position of American religious groups in modern party politics. We first outline two different models of religious politics, the ethnoreligious and the religious restructuring model. We then use a number of data sets to reconstruct the contribution that religious groups have made to party coalitions from the New Deal era t...
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The influence of religious institutions, people and ideas over American foreign policy has been a growing area of inquiry among social scientists and other scholars in recent years. And although there has been considerable disagreement about the extent of religious influences over a broad range of foreign policy questions, there is massive consensu...
Article
Religion and American Foreign Policy, 1945–1960: The Soul of Containment. By InbodenWilliam. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2008. Xi + 356 pp. $90.00 cloth, $28.00 paper - Volume 4 Issue 2 - James L. Guth
Article
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Recent years have seen a proliferation of studies on the determinants of support for the European Union among national publics. Scholars have analyzed economic, political, informational, and identity factors as influences, but there has been less exploration of cultural factors, most notably religion. This article replicates our earlier studies exp...
Article
The rediscovery of religion by international relations scholars has produced growing interest in the way that faith shapes American attitudes on foreign policy. Whatever the exact nexus between citizen opinion and elite decisions, public attitudes do provide a vital context for those choices. In recent years there has been a tidal wave of polemical...
Article
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Despite much speculation about the influence of religious factors over public attitudes on foreign policy, there are still few systematic analyses testing that influence. In this paper, we use the 2008 American National Election Study to investigate support for one central dimension of American foreign policy attitudes, militant internationalism (W...
Article
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This article focuses on the ways religious factors might influence public opinion on foreign policy issues. It reviews the latest political science perspectives on the shape of public opinion on foreign policy that have emphasized the coherence of competing public orientations toward American policy in the world. One section considers the existing...
Book
Religion is, and has always been, a powerful force in American politics. Over the past three decades, the study of religion and politics has gone from being ignored by the scholarly community to being a major focus of research. Yet, because this important research is not easily accessible to nonspecialists, much of the analysis of religion's role i...
Article
Ever since the reelection of President Bush, conservative Christians have been stereotyped in the popular media: Bible-thumping militants and anti-intellectual zealots determined to impose their convictions on such matters as evolution, school prayer, pornography, abortion, and homosexuality on the rest of us. But conservative Christians are not as...
Chapter
This chapter analyzes coverage of the religious dimensions of the 2004 U.S. presidential election and concludes that journalists consistently misunderstood the meaning and dynamics of many of the events on which they reported. The labels often used by journalists to categorize religious adherents missed many of the most important political cleavage...
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Few of George W. Bush's Yale fraternity brothers would have predicted his rise to the presidency, despite his distinguished political heritage. Even fewer would have expected his administration to be the "most resolutely 'faith-based' in modern times" (Fineman 2003). In fact, the first "insider" book on Bush's tenure in office opened with an anecdo...
Chapter
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This chapter provides a magisterial summary of voting behavior and religious allegiance since the Great Depression. Its authors have pioneered in specifying connections between political and religious allegiances in the modern period. This time they have the advantage of mass public polling. The broad political patterns documented for the major rel...
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In recent years, much attention has been directed at the way religious factors influence American policy toward the Middle East. Scholars have discovered that many religious groups hold distinctive views on the issues affecting that region. In this paper, we consider one possible source of those views: the attitudes of religious "opinion leaders,"...
Chapter
Greenville County, South Carolina, is exactly the sort of place to observe "culture wars" first hand. As the state's largest county, Greenville is a big notch in the Bible Belt: one birthplace of the conservative Southern Baptist Convention, the nation's largest Protestant denomination, and home to Bob Jones University, a leading fundamentalist col...
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It is widely recognized that religion played a major role in the 2004 presidential election and that recognition has enlivened the debate over the meaning of the election results, including the importance of "moral values," the effect of religious mobilization, and the contribution of particular religious communities to the outcome.1 It is on the l...
Chapter
In recent years, the "religious right" has often seemed like a raging torrent, moving voters to the polls. Not so the "religious left." Certainly no credible observer would characterize the latter as a "raging torrent" in terms of its impact on voters. But is it at least a gentle stream? And could it grow into a "river glorious"?1 This chapter atte...
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As the 2004 presidential campaign began, some analysts and political strategists pondered whether evangelical Protestants’ enthusiasm for political engagement might be waning. After all, during the past century, evangelicals have exhibited a cyclical pattern of political engagement and then withdrawal. And now a quarter-century has passed since the...
Article
In this article, we examine the impact of religious variables on the vote in the 2004 pres- idential election. First, we review and evaluate two theories that underlie many interpretations of religion's role in American electoral politics, namely, the ethnoreligious and the religious restructuring perspectives. Using both approaches, we deploy a co...
Chapter
Within the intense debate over the meaning of the 2004 election there was a clear point of consensus: The Christian Right was a key player in the campaign. Indeed, the ballots had hardly been counted when a series of liberal pundits blamed Christian conservatives for the outcome (see Marshall 2004)-an accusation that conservative Christian leaders...
Chapter
Religion has always played a part in Southern politics, although that role has often been obscured. The leaders of institutional religion, the clergy, have often been deeply enmeshed in critical political developments in the region, though often while denying any such involvement. In this chapter, I consider the nature of contemporary political act...
Article
Until recently the impact of faith on foreign policy has gone largely unnoticed by the mainstream public and media. Observers are divided as to whether it is primarily religious traditionalists or progressives that are shaping US foreign policy. Theauthors' survey of religious groups' attitudes towards US foreign policy and the Bush Doctrine reveal...
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School Board Battles: The Christian Right in Local Politics. By Melissa M. Deckman. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press, 2004. 240p. $39.95 cloth, $26.95 paper. Although it is almost conventional wisdom that the Christian Right was born in local political controversies, often over public education, scholars have usually focused on the movem...
Chapter
For few religious groups have political questions been more central to their identity than to Mennonites. As descendents of the Anabaptist wing of the Reformation, the Mennonites have focused above all on pacifism or nonresistance to evil. Adhering to a "two kingdoms" doctrine, they have respected the authority of the state as an instrument of God...
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Over the past twenty years, the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) has undergone a remarkable theological, organizational, and political transformation. Throughout the 1980s, theological conservatives mounted a sustained and ultimately successful campaign to "take back" the SBC from the hands of denominational bureaucrats and theological moderates....
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This article focuses on the political participation of ministers from five evangelical Protestant denominations that differ in theology, polity, and history. Despite such differences, these clergy respond to political influences in much the same fashion. We find that the standard theories of political participation have varying success in accountin...
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On November 7, 2000, despite the ardent pleas of clergy front across the spectrum of religious traditions, South Carolina voters repealed a constitutional amendment to pave the way for a state lottery. In a state known for intense evangelical religiosity, this outcome raises several important questions about the political influence of religion and...
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Religion is an important influence on adult attitudes toward European integration, as devout Catholics strongly support integration, while committed Protestants are less enthusiastic. Here we consider whether this relationship holds for reputedly secularized European youth. Using Eurobarometer 47.2OVR, we show that devout Catholic and Orthodox yout...
Chapter
Democracy, as Tocqueville insisted, requires civic associations that are not specifically political in nature, yet ones that still function as sources of meaning and social engagement. As he took note of American life in the early 1800s, Tocqueville observed that the United States had a breadth and depth of group participation that appeared to be u...

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