James Sneed German

James Sneed German
Aix-Marseille Université | AMU · Laboratoire Parole et Langage

Ph. D. Linguistics

About

30
Publications
6,691
Reads
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216
Citations
Citations since 2017
13 Research Items
137 Citations
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201720182019202020212022202305101520253035
201720182019202020212022202305101520253035
201720182019202020212022202305101520253035
Additional affiliations
September 2018 - present
Aix-Marseille Université
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
January 2015 - August 2018
Aix-Marseille Université
Position
  • Chair
July 2010 - December 2014
Nanyang Technological University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
September 2001 - August 2008
Northwestern University
Field of study
  • Linguistics

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
In this article we present the Database of Word-Level Statistics for Mandarin Chinese (DoWLS-MAN). The database addresses the lack of agreement in phonological syllable segmentation specific to Mandarin by offering phonological features for each lexical item according to 16 schematic representations of the syllable (8 with tone and 8 without tone)....
Article
Full-text available
Pitch accents are local pitch patterns that convey differences in word prominence and modulate the information structure of the discourse. Despite the importance to discourse in languages like English, neural processing of pitch accents remains understudied. The current study investigates the neural processing of pitch accents by native and non-nat...
Article
Full-text available
It is now well documented for different varieties of English that the speech production and perception systems rapidly adapt to contextual social cues. This adaptation is sensitive not only to speaker social identity but also to implicit social cues, suggesting that the underlying mechanism is automatic rather than controlled. While it has recently...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A growing body of evidence reveals that tune meaning is multidimensional and flexible, with the choice of a tune depending both on linguistic and metalinguistic purposes. This study explores how perlocutionary meaning is influenced by tune for requests and offers. Two female speakers of American English produced 96 request-offer pairs in the form o...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Cross-linguistically, the way that focus is marked through prosody can depend on a variety of factors, including local constraints on prosodic organizat ion or the position of a word within the larger focus constituent. Here we report on a production study that explores the possible influence of prosodic organization and position on focus realizati...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The intonational melody of Singapore English has previously been described as consisting of a series of repeated downstepped rises over an utterance. The exact nature of this rise, however, differs by phrasal position, with significantly higher variability in contour shape and tonal alignment in non-initial Accentual Phrases than in initial ones. I...
Article
Full-text available
Background/aims: In French, the size of a focus constituent is not reliably marked through pitch accent assignment as in many stress accent languages. While it has been argued that the distribution of lower-level prosodic boundaries plays a role, this is at best a weak cue to focus, leaving open the question of whether other marking strategies are...
Preprint
This chapter surveys the intonation of Northern and Southern hemisphere mainstream and non-mainstream varieties of English as well as contact varieties spoken in Hong Kong, East, West and South Africa, Singapore, India, the South Pacific islands, the Caribbean and Malta. We explore the challenges posed by their diverging prosodic structures, in ter...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports on a speech production experiment that explores whether the Accentual Phrase (AP) represents an abstract level of prosodic phrasing in Singapore English. Specifically, it tests whether the right edge of the AP is associated with phrase-final lengthening, the degree of which can be distinguished from lengthening associated with th...
Article
This study addresses the relationship between information structure and intonation in French. Using an interactive speech production experiment, it tests the hypothesis that the French initial rise (LHi) is used to mark the left edge of a contrastively focused constituent. Since the occurrence of the initial rise is also known to be sensitive to th...
Conference Paper
Inexact design has been recognized as very viable approach to achieve significant gains in the energy, area and speed efficiencies of digital circuits. By deliberately trading error in return for such these gains, inexact circuits and architectures have been shown to be especially useful in contexts where our senses such as sight and hearing, can c...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
While previous studies have observed that the specificity effect of voice-onset time (VOT) is mediated by VOT length [1], the role of the direction of mismatch at prime versus test has not been directly explored. This study addresses this issue through a long-term repetition priming experiment that simultaneously manipulated both VOT length at test...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A number of studies have investigated the phonetic properties of intonation patterns in Singapore English (SE). Additionally, it has been proposed that SE intonation is structured by a level of phonological phrasing above the word called the Accentual Phrase (AP), which encompasses a content word and preceding function words. This study investigate...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Speakers are able to adjust their prosodic patterns to approximate those of a different dialect, at least when the dialects involved are phonologically similar [6, 7]. Our study explores imitation across two dialects of English (Singaporean and American) whose prosodic systems are phonologically very distinct. Singaporean speakers were recorded bot...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper presents original data in support of a new model of intonational phonology for Malay as spoken in Singapore. Building on the Autosegmental-Metrical approach (Beckman & Pierrehumbert, 1986), we propose that intonational variation in Malay can be explained in terms of underlying sequences of abstract tonal units (H and L), which are aligne...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The deliberate attempt by speakers to conceal their identity (voice disguise) presents a challenge for forensics and for automated speaker identification systems. Using a database of natural and disguised voices of three professional voice artists, we build on earlier findings in [Amin et al., 2014] by exploring how certain glottal and vocal tract...
Article
Full-text available
Voice impersonators possess a flexible voice which allows them to imitate and create different voice identities. These impersonations present a challenge for forensic analysis and speaker identification systems. To better understand the phenomena underlying successful voice impersonation, we collected a database of synchronous speech and ElectroGlo...
Article
In an experiment spanning a week, American English speakers imitated a Glaswegian (Scottish) English speaker. The target sounds were allophones of /t/ and /r/, as the Glaswegian speaker aspirated word-medial /t/ but pronounced /r/ as a flap initially and medially. This experiment therefore explored (a) whether speakers could learn to reassign a sou...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Voice impersonators possess a flexible voice and thus can change their voice identity. They are able to imitate various people and characters which differ in age, gender, accent and voice quality. State of the art electronic voice conversion systems are not able to successfully mimic their human counterparts as they lack naturalness. To understand...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Adaptation to an unfamiliar dialect of one's native language presents a special case for prosodic learning, since most other aspects of the grammar are held constant. This study explores the representation of two dimensions of tune through a series of experimental tasks in which speakers of American English attempt to directly imitate and then gene...
Chapter
Full-text available
Much recent work on German and English intonation has addressed the impact of information structure on prosodic patterns in terms of the focus/background partition. In contrast with stress-accent languages such as Italian, Spanish or English, French does not appear to signal focus through pitch accent assignment, rather it appears to mainly exploit...
Chapter
Full-text available
In English and other languages, the distribution of nuclear pitch accents within a sentence usually reflects how the meaningful parts of the sentence relate to the context. Generally speaking, the nuclear pitch accent can only occur felicitously on focused parts of the sentence, corresponding to information that is not contextually retrievable or g...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study addresses the relationship between information structure and intonation in French. More specifically, it tests whether phrase-initial rises (LHi) are associated with the left edge of contrastively focused constituents in wh-interrogatives. Since LHi distribution has also been correlated with length, the study further examines the relativ...
Article
Full-text available
1. INTRODUCTION. The distribution of pitch accents in speech is a topic of long-standing importance because it reflects the relationships among different levels of repre-sentation: phonology, syntax, semantics, and information structure. The broad tendency for accents to be located on new information is a classic observation, but formalizing the pr...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Developing an intonational phonology model of Singapore English Intonation