James Philip Duffy

James Philip Duffy
University of Exeter | UoE · College of Life and Environmental Sciences

Bsc Geography with Ecology

About

47
Publications
24,873
Reads
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2,551
Citations
Additional affiliations
December 2014 - June 2018
University of Exeter
Position
  • PhD Student
December 2011 - November 2014
University of Exeter
Position
  • Technician
September 2010 - November 2011
Zoological Society of London
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
September 2007 - June 2010
University of Sussex
Field of study
  • Geography with Ecology

Publications

Publications (47)
Article
Full-text available
Aim Species distribution models (SDMs) have been used widely to predict the responses of species to climate change. However, the climate data used to drive these models typically represents ambient air temperatures, derived from measurements taken 1–2 m above the ground. Most plant species live near the ground where temperatures can differ signific...
Article
Microclimate models predict temperature and other meteorological variables at scales relevant to individual organisms. The broad application of microclimate models requires gridded macroclimatic variables as input. However, the spatial and temporal resolution of such inputs can be a limiting factor on the accuracy of microclimate predictions. Due t...
Article
Full-text available
Sonic Kayaks are low-cost open-source systems for gathering fine-scale environmental data. The system is designed to be simple to fit on to standard kayaks or canoes, and full instructions have been made available for anyone wishing to build their own. The previous version included temperature sensors and a hydrophone for recording underwater sound...
Article
Full-text available
Many organisms live in environments in which temperatures differ substantially from those measured by standard weather stations. The last decade has witnessed a paradigm shift in efforts to quantify these differences and to understand their ecological, functional and evolutionary implications. This renewed interest in microclimate ecology has been...
Article
Full-text available
Context Microclimate (fine-scale temperature variability within metres of Earth’s surface) is highly influential on terrestrial organisms’ ability to survive and function. Understanding how such local climatic conditions vary is challenging to measure at adequate spatio-temporal resolution. Microclimate models provide the means to address this limi...
Technical Report
Full-text available
for more information visit: https://space-science.wwf.de/drones this is a detailed handbook for conservation practitioners (not just academics) to understand the benefits, opportunities, limits of drone technology. Drones are often hailed as a panacea for conservation problems - in this guide we use the scientific literature and 10 case studies (...
Preprint
Full-text available
Sonic Kayaks are low-cost open-source systems for gathering fine-scale environmental data. The system is designed to be simple to fit on to standard kayaks or canoes, and full instructions have been made available for anyone wishing to build their own. The first version included temperature sensors and a hydrophone for recording underwater sound. H...
Preprint
Full-text available
Structure-from-Motion Multi View Stereo (SfM-MVS) photogrammetry is a technique by which volumetric data can be derived from overlapping image sets, using changes of an objects position between images to determine its height and spatial structure. Whilst SfM-MVS has fast become a powerful tool for scientific research, its potential lies beyond the...
Article
Microclimates are the thermal and hydric environments organisms actually experience and estimates of them are increasingly needed in environmental research. The availability of global weather and terrain data sets, together with increasingly sophisticated microclimate modelling tools, makes the prospect of a global, web‐based microclimate estimatio...
Article
Full-text available
The field of ecology has focused on understanding characteristics of natural systems in a manner as free as possible from biases of human observers. However, demand is growing for knowledge of human–nature interactions at the level of individual people. This is particularly driven by concerns around human health consequences due to changes in posit...
Article
Full-text available
The interrelationship between public interest in endangered species and the attention they receive from the conservation community is the ‘flywheel’ driving much effort to abate global extinction rates. Yet big international conservation non-governmental organisations have typically focused on the plight of a handful of appealing endangered species...
Data
The top 100 most Googled reptiles in the world. Data corresponding to Fig 2c. (PDF)
Data
The top 100 most Googled birds in the world. Data corresponding to Fig 2f. (PDF)
Data
Google Trends data acquisition and standardisation. (PDF)
Data
The top 100 most Googled vertebrates in the world. Data corresponding to Fig 2a. (PDF)
Data
The top 52 most Googled amphibians in the world. Data corresponding to Fig 2e. (PDF)
Data
Species that were omitted from the analysis due to containing one or more identical common names and having highly correlated monthly web search interest (Pearson’s correlation >0.90). (PDF)
Data
Raw data used in the international aid data analysis (Fig 4). (PDF)
Data
The top 100 most Googled mammals in the world. Data corresponding to Fig 2b. (PDF)
Data
The top 100 most Google fish in the world. Data corresponding to Fig 2d. (PDF)
Data
Species of endangered and critically endangered vertebrate that receive low web search interest. (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
Coastal dunes are globally-distributed dynamic ecosystems that occur at the land-sea interface. They are sensitive to disturbance both from natural forces and anthropogenic stressors, and therefore require regular monitoring to track changes in their form and function ultimately informing management decisions. Existing techniques employing satellit...
Article
Full-text available
• Although strictly protected, populations of the hazel dormouse Muscardinus avellanarius in the UK declined by 72% from 1993 to 2014. Using National Dormouse Monitoring Programme data from 300 sites throughout England and Wales, we investigated variation in hazel dormouse population status (expressed as Indices of Abundance, Breeding, and populati...
Article
Full-text available
Naturally dark nighttime environments are being widely eroded by the introduction of artificial light at night (ALAN). The biological impacts vary with the intensity and spectrum of ALAN, but have been documented from molecules to ecosystems. How globally severe these impacts are likely to be depends in large part on the relationship between the sp...
Article
Full-text available
Seagrass ecosystems are highly sensitive to environmental change. They are also in global decline and under threat from a variety of anthropogenic factors. There is now an urgency to establish robust monitoring methodologies so that changes in seagrass abundance and distribution in these sensitive coastal environments can be understood. Typical mon...
Article
Full-text available
Lightweight drones have emerged recently as a remote sensing survey tool of choice for ecologists, conservation practitioners and environmental scientists. In published work, there are plentiful details on the parameters and settings used for successful data capture, but in contrast there is a dearth of information describing the operational comple...
Article
Full-text available
Lightweight drones have emerged recently as a remote sensing survey tool of choice for ecologists, conservation practitioners and environmental scientists. In published work, there are plentiful details on the parameters and settings used for successful data capture, but in contrast there is a dearth of information describing the operational comple...
Article
Full-text available
The academic literature of late is rich with examples of lightweight drones being used to capture data to support scientific research. Drone science is a blossoming field, but alongside a long-standing public concern about drone safety, the research community and our collaborators are increasingly calling for a ‘code of best practice’ for researche...
Article
The existence of fine-grain climate heterogeneity has prompted suggestions that species may be able to survive future climate change in pockets of suitable microclimate, termed 'microrefugia'. However, evidence for microrefugia is hindered by lack of understanding of how rates of warming vary across a landscape. Here we present a model that is appl...
Article
Full-text available
This manuscript describes the development of an android-based smartphone application for capturing aerial photographs and spatial metadata automatically, for use in grassroots mapping applications. The aim of the project was to exploit the plethora of on-board sensors within modern smartphones (accelerometer, GPS, compass, camera) to generate ready...
Article
In 1903, WH Dines first proposed kites as platforms from which scientific measurements could be captured. This early paper was focused on the collection of atmospheric measurements but later on, kites were used widely as platforms for aerial photography – a memorable example is the aerial survey of San Francisco captured from a kite platform after...
Article
Full-text available
A high proportion of plant species is predicted to be threatened with extinction in the near future. However, the threat status of only a small number has been evaluated compared with key animal groups, rendering the magnitude and nature of the risks plants face unclear. Here we report the results of a global species assessment for the largest plan...
Article
Full-text available
The continuous increase in the intensity and extent of anthropogenic artificial light has significantly shaped Earth's nighttime environment. This environmental change has effects across the natural world, with consequences for organismal physiology and behaviour and the abundances and distributions of species. Here, we evaluate for the first time...
Article
Full-text available
Many marine ecosystems are shaped by regimes of natural light guiding the behaviour of their constituent species. As evidenced from terrestrial systems, the global introduction of nighttime lighting is likely influencing these behaviours, restructuring marine ecosystems, and compromising the services they provide. Yet the extent to which marine hab...
Article
Full-text available
The rapid growth in electric light usage across the globe has led to increasing presence of artificial light in natural and semi-natural ecosystems at night. This occurs both due to direct illumination and skyglow - scattered light in the atmosphere. There is increasing concern about the effects of artificial light on biological processes, biodiver...
Article
The nighttime light environment of much of the earth has been transformed by the introduction of electric lighting. This impact continues to spread with growth in the human population and extent of urbanization. This has profound consequences for organismal physiology and behavior and affects abundances and distributions of species, community struc...
Article
Agroecosystems have traditionally been considered incompatible with biological conservation goals, and often been excluded from spatial conservation prioritization strategies. The consequences for the representativeness of identified priority areas have been little explored. Here, we evaluate these for biodiversity and carbon storage representation...
Article
Biodiversity is undergoing unprecedented global decline. Efforts to slow this rate have focused foremost on rarer species, which are at most risk of extinction. Less interest has been paid to more common species, despite their greater importance in terms of ecosystem function and service provision. How rates of decline are partitioned between commo...
Article
Full-text available
Artificial light at night is profoundly altering natural light cycles, particularly as perceived by many organisms, over extensive areas of the globe. This alteration comprises the introduction of light at night at places and times at which it has not previously occurred, and with different spectral signatures. Given the long geological periods for...
Article
Many animals regulate their activity over a 24-h sleep-wake cycle, concentrating their peak periods of activity to coincide with the hours of daylight, darkness, or twilight, or using different periods of light and darkness in more complex ways. These behavioral differences, which are in themselves functional traits, are associated with suites of p...
Article
Despite centuries of use, artificial light at night has only recently been recognized as a cause for environmental concern. Its global extent and ongoing encroachment into naturally lit ecosystems has sparked scientific interest into the many ways in which it may negatively affect human health, societal attitudes, scientific endeavors, and biologic...
Article
Full-text available
Since the 1970s nighttime satellite images of the Earth from space have provided a striking illustration of the extent of artificial light. Meanwhile, growing awareness of adverse impacts of artificial light at night on scientific astronomy, human health, ecological processes and aesthetic enjoyment of the night sky has led to recognition of light...
Article
Assessing the extent to which populations are limited by bottom-up processes driven by food limitation is crucial to our understanding of how ecosystems should be managed. Using satellite-derived Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) as an index of resource availability, we investigated the relationships between greenness levels and African...

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