James M Daley

James M Daley
Yale University | YU · Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry

PhD

About

36
Publications
2,530
Reads
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1,961
Citations
Citations since 2016
16 Research Items
1169 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
Additional affiliations
July 2007 - December 2010
Université de Montréal
Position
  • PostDoc Position
July 2001 - June 2007
University of Michigan
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (36)
Article
Full-text available
The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system is a major DNA repair system that corrects DNA replication errors. In eukaryotes, the MMR system functions via mechanisms both dependent on and independent of Exonuclease 1 (EXO1), an enzyme that has multiple roles in DNA metabolism. Although the mechanism of EXO1-dependent MMR is well understood, less is known...
Article
Significance A DNA double-strand break (DSB) can be repaired accurately by homologous recombination. The Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex is responsible for initiating homologous recombination by degrading 5′-ended DNA strand, where its activation by the Ctp1 cofactor plays a pivotal role. Here, by using purified fission yeast proteins, we show that...
Article
Full-text available
DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination begins with nucleolytic resection of the 5’ DNA strand at the break ends. Long-range resection is catalyzed by EXO1 and BLM-DNA2, which likely have to navigate through ribonucleotides and damaged bases. Here, we show that a short stretch of ribonucleotides at the 5’ terminus stimulates rese...
Article
Full-text available
Bloom helicase (BLM) and its orthologs are essential for the maintenance of genome integrity. BLM defects represent the underlying cause of Bloom Syndrome, a rare genetic disorder that is marked by strong cancer predisposition. BLM deficient cells accumulate extensive chromosomal aberrations stemming from dysfunctions in homologous recombination (H...
Article
Full-text available
The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination (HR) is initiated by nucleolytic resection of the DNA break ends. The current model, being based primarily on genetic analyses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and companion biochemical reconstitution studies, posits that end resection proceeds in two distinct stages. Specifically...
Article
Full-text available
The budding yeast Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 (MRX) complex and Sae2 function together in DNA end resection during homologous recombination. Here we show that the Ku complex shields DNA ends from exonucleolytic digestion but facilitates endonucleolytic scission by MRX with a dependence on ATP and Sae2. The incision site is enlarged into a DNA gap via the exon...
Article
Full-text available
DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination entails the resection of DNA ends to reveal ssDNA tails, which are used to invade a homologous DNA template. CtIP and its yeast ortholog Sae2 regulate the nuclease activity of MRE11 in the initial stage of resection. Deletion of CtIP in the mouse or SAE2 in yeast engenders a more severe phe...
Chapter
In homologous recombination (HR), DNA polymerase δ-mediated DNA synthesis occurs within the displacement loop (D-loop) that is made by the recombinase Rad51 in conjunction with accessory factors. We describe in this chapter the reconstitution of the D-loop and repair DNA synthesis reactions using purified Saccharomyces cerevisiae HR (Rad51, RPA, an...
Article
Full-text available
Replication stress is a characteristic feature of cancer cells, which is resulted from sustained proliferative signaling induced by activation of oncogenes or loss of tumor suppressors. In cancer cells, oncogene-induced replication stress manifests as replication-associated lesions, predominantly double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). An essential mechan...
Article
DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination entails nucleolytic resection of the 5' strand at break ends. Dna2, a flap endonuclease with 5'-3' helicase activity, is involved in the resection process. The Dna2 helicase activity has been implicated in Okazaki fragment processing during DNA replication but is thought to be dispensable f...
Preprint
Full-text available
Replication stress is a characteristic feature of cancer cells, which is resulted from sustained proliferative signaling induced by activation of oncogenes or loss of tumor suppressors. In cancer cells, oncogene-induced replication stress manifests as replication-associated lesions, predominantly double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). An essential mechan...
Article
Nucleolytic resection of DNA double-strand breaks is the crucial first step in their repair via homologous recombination. New findings by Tkáč et al. (2016) published in this issue of Molecular Cell identify HELB as a novel, cell-cycle-specific negative regulator of DNA end resection.
Article
Full-text available
DNA double-strand breaks can be eliminated via non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ is initiated by the association of Ku with DNA ends. In contrast, HR entails nucleolytic resection of the 5' strands, forming 3' ssDNA tails that become coated by RPA. Ku restricts end access by the resection nuclease Exo1. It is...
Article
Full-text available
BLM, a RecQ family DNA helicase mutated in Bloom's Syndrome, participates in homologous recombination at two stages: 5′ DNA end resection and double Holliday junction dissolution. BLM exists in a complex with Topo IIIα, RMI1 and RMI2. Herein, we address the role of Topo IIIα and RMI1-RMI2 in resection using a reconstituted system with purified huma...
Article
Homologous recombination (HR) is a major mechanism for eliminating DNA double-strand breaks from chromosomes. In this process, the break termini are resected nucleolytically to form 3' ssDNA (single-strand DNA) overhangs. A recombinase (i.e., a protein that catalyzes homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange) assembles onto the ssDNA and promotes...
Article
The G-rich single-stranded DNA at the 3' end of human telomeres can self-fold into G-quaduplex (GQ). However, telomere lengthening by telomerase or the recombination-based alternative lengthening of telomere (ALT) mechanism requires protein loading on the overhang. Using single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, we discovered that lengthening the...
Article
When DNA double-strand breaks occur, the cell cycle stage has a major influence on the choice of the repair pathway employed. Specifically, nonhomologous end joining is the predominant mechanism used in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, while homologous recombination becomes fully activated in S phase. Studies over the past 2 decades have revealed th...
Article
The DNA double-strand break (DSB), arising from exposure to ionizing radiation or various chemotherapeutic agents or from replication fork collapse, is among the most dangerous of chromosomal lesions. DSBs are highly cytotoxic and can lead to translocations, deletions, duplications, or mutations if mishandled. DSBs are eliminated by either homologo...
Article
Homologous recombination (HR) is an evolutionarily conserved process that eliminates DNA double-strand breaks from chromosomes, repairs injured DNA replication forks, and helps orchestrate meiotic chromosome segregation. Recent studies have shown that DNA helicases play multifaceted roles in HR mediation and regulation. In particular, the S. cerevi...
Article
New findings on the RIF1 protein by four research groups, including Chapman et al. (2013) and Escribano-Díaz et al. (2013) in this issue, provide insights into DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice in mammalian cells.
Article
Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases are versatile DNA repair enzymes that possess a variety of nucleolytic activities, including endonuclease activity at AP sites, 3' phosphodiesterase activity that can remove a variety of ligation-blocking lesions from the 3' end of DNA, endonuclease activity on oxidative DNA lesions, and 3' to 5' exonuclease...
Article
Full-text available
Mutations in Aprataxin cause the neurodegenerative syndrome ataxia oculomotor apraxia type 1. Aprataxin catalyzes removal of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) from the 5' end of a DNA strand, which results from an aborted attempt to ligate a strand break containing a damaged end. To gain insight into which DNA lesions are substrates for Aprataxin actio...
Article
Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) in yeast depends on eight different proteins in at least three different functional complexes: Yku70-Yku80 (Ku), Dnl4-Lif1-Nej1 (DNA ligase IV), and Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 (MRX). Interactions between these complexes at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are poorly understood but critical for the completion of repair. We prev...
Article
Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) directly rejoins DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) when recombination is not possible. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the DNA polymerase Pol4 is required for gap filling when a short 3' overhang must prime DNA synthesis. Here, we examined further end variations to test specific hypotheses regarding Pol4 usage in NHEJ in...
Article
Ku-dependent nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is a double-strand break repair process conserved in all branches of cellular life but has not previously been implicated in the DNA metabolic processes of viruses. We identified Ku homologs in Corndog and Omega, two related mycobacteriophages of Mycobacterium smegmatis. These proteins formed homodimers...
Article
The nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway of DNA double-strand break repair requires three protein complexes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: MRX (Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2), Ku (Ku70-Ku80), and DNA ligase IV (Dnl4-Lif1-Nej1). Much is known about the interactions that mediate the formation of each complex, but little is known about how they act together duri...
Article
Full-text available
DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) can be rejoined directly by the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway of repair. Nucleases and polymerases are required to promote accurate NHEJ when the terminal bases of the DSB are damaged. The same enzymes also participate in imprecise rejoining and joining of incompatible ends, important mutagenic events. Pre...
Article
The ends of spontaneously occurring double-strand breaks (DSBs) may contain various lengths of single-stranded DNA, blocking lesions, and gaps and flaps generated by end annealing. To investigate the processing of such structures, we developed an assay in which annealed oligonucleotides are ligated onto the ends of a linearized plasmid which is the...
Article
Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), the direct rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks, is closely associated with illegitimate recombination and chromosomal rearrangement. This has led to the concept that NHEJ is error prone. Studies with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have revealed that this model eukaryote has a classical NHEJ pathway dependent...
Article
Full-text available
In mammalian cells, repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is critical for genome stability. Although the end-bridging and ligation steps of NHEJ have been reconstituted in vitro, little is known about the end-processing reactions that occur before ligation. Recently, functionally homologous end-bridging and l...

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