James Dahlhamer

James Dahlhamer
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | CDC · National Center for Health Statistics

Ph.D.

About

70
Publications
11,807
Reads
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3,529
Citations
Additional affiliations
May 2001 - present
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
April 2001 - January 2017
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Position
  • Senior Specialist in Survey Methods
April 2001 - January 2017
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Position
  • Senior Specialist in Survey Methods

Publications

Publications (70)
Article
Pain has been established as a major public health problem in the United States (U.S.) with 50 million adults experiencing chronic pain and 20 million afflicted with high-impact chronic pain (i.e., chronic pain that interferes with life or work activities). High financial and social costs are associated with chronic pain. Over the past two decades,...
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Objective-This report examines differences in survey reports of disability between two sets of disability questions, the Short Set on Functioning (WG-SS) developed by the Washington Group on Disability Statistics (WG) and a set of disability questions developed for the American Community Survey (ACS). Methods-Data from the 2011-2012 National Health...
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Objective-This report presents prevalence estimates of prescription opioid use among U.S. adults with chronic pain. Methods-Data from the redesigned 2019 National Health Interview Survey were used to estimate the prevalence of prescription opioid use in the past 3 months among adults aged 18 and over with chronic pain (pain on most days or every da...
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Objective-To measure health care utilization among adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and compare with adults without IBD. Methods-Adults aged 18 and over with IBD (1.2%) and without IBD were identified from the 2015 and 2016 National Health Interview Survey (n = 66,610). This study presents age-adjusted percentages and model-adjusted pre...
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Sleep problems may increase the risk for, and result from, other health problems and negatively impact quality of life. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual older adults report more sleep problems compared to their straight counterparts when such problems are measured in the aggregate (e.g. “one or more of four specific sleep problems”). However, scant natio...
Article
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Pain is not only a result of other health problems but an independent condition that can negatively impact quality of life. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual older adults report more pain compared to their straight counterparts when pain is measured in the aggregate (e.g. “one or more of the following types of pain”). However, scant national research has...
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Chronic pain (1) and chronic pain that frequently limits life or work activities, referred to in this report as high-impact chronic pain (2), are among the most common reasons adults seek medical care (3) and are associated with decreased quality of life, opioid dependence, and poor mental health (1,4,5). This report examines chronic pain and high-...
Article
Supplemental Table A21.1 Questions, Question Characteristics, and Intra-Interviewer Correlations (IIC) Table A21.2 Descriptive Statistics for Respondent and Case Characteristics Included in Multi-Level Models Table A21.3 Descriptive Statistics for County Measures Included in Multi-Level Models Table A21.4 Descriptive Statistics for Interviewer Char...
Chapter
This paper builds upon previous research that uses multilevel models to examine the joint effects of interviewers, respondents, and questions on data quality. Using data from the 2014 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), we use multilevel modeling to estimate the contribution of questions, respondents, and interviewers to variability in respons...
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Privacy, achieved through self-administered modes of interviewing, has long been assumed to be a necessary prerequisite for obtaining unbiased responses to sexual identity questions due to their potentially sensitive nature. This study uses data collected as part of a split-ballot field test embedded in the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) t...
Article
Background: General population surveys are increasingly offering broader response options for questions on sexual orientation-for example, not only gay or lesbian, but also "something else" (SE) and "don't know" (DK). However, these additional response options are potentially confusing for those who may not know what the terms mean. Researchers st...
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Background Previous reports suggest that adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) receive suboptimal preventive care. Aims The population-based study compared the receipt of these services by US adults with and without IBD. Methods Adults aged ≥ 18 years with IBD (1.2%) and without IBD were identified from the 2015 and 2016 National Health In...
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Interviewers play a critical role in determining the quality of data collected in face-to-face surveys. Interviewers can have positive effects on recruiting sample members to participate, leading to higher response rates. Conversely, interviewers can have negative effects on the quality of measurement. The literature suggests that interviewers can...
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Chronic pain, one of the most common reasons adults seek medical care (1), has been linked to restrictions in mobility and daily activities (2,3), dependence on opioids (4), anxiety and depression (2), and poor perceived health or reduced quality of life (2,3). Population-based estimates of chronic pain among U.S. adults range from 11% to 40% (5),...
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Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, involves chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. In 2015, an estimated 3.1 million adults in the United States had ever received a diagnosis of IBD (1). Nationally representative samples of adults with IBD have been unavailable or too small to asses...
Article
Introduction: This study identifies associations between sleep outcomes and sexual orientation net of sociodemographic and health-related characteristics, and produces estimates generalizable to the US adult population. Participants/methods: We used 2013-2015 National Health Interview Survey data (46,909 men; 56,080 women) to examine sleep durat...
Article
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the prevalence and odds of participation in online health-related activities among lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults and straight adults aged 18-64. Methods: Primary data collected in the 2013 and 2014 National Health Interview Survey, a nationally representative household health survey, were use...
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What is already known about this topic? Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease, are characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Inflammatory bowel disease has been associated with decreased quality of life and extensive morbidity and often results in complications requiring...
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Objectives: To assess the extent to which lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) adults aged 18 to 64 years experience barriers to health care. Methods: We used 2013 National Health Interview Survey data on 521 gay or lesbian (291 men, 230 women), 215 bisexual (66 men, 149 women), and 25 149 straight (11 525 men, 13 624 women) adults. Five barrier-to-...
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Introduction Research is needed on chronic health conditions among lesbian, gay, and bisexual populations. The objective of this study was to examine 10 diagnosed chronic conditions, and multiple (≥2) chronic conditions (MCC), by sexual orientation among US adults. Methods The 2013 National Health Interview Survey was used to generate age-adjusted...
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Objective-This report presents a set of quality analyses of sexual orientation data collected in the 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). NHIS sexual orientation estimates are compared with those from the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Selected health outcomes by s...
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Objective: To provide national estimates for indicators of health-related behaviors, health status, health care service utilization, and health care access by sexual orientation using data from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). Methods: NHIS is an annual multipurpose health survey conducted continuously throughout the year. Analy...
Article
PurposeApplying an intersectional approach to the analysis of nationally representative population data collected through the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), this chapter attempts to address the congruence between functional status (disability) and other relevant socio-demographic background variables (gender, race, self-reported health st...
Conference Paper
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Face-to-face surveys provide interviewers the opportunity to gather information beyond the scope of the survey. These observational paradata may prove useful for streamlining the data collection process and enhancing post collection weighting adjustments, both improving the quality of survey estimates. However, interviewer observations can be error...
Article
Patterns of prevalence and work-relatedness of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) among workers offer clues about risk factors and targets for prevention. Data from an occupational health supplement to the 2010 National Health Interview Survey were used to estimate the prevalence of self-reported clinician-diagnosed CTS overall and by demographic charact...
Article
Background: Prevalence patterns of dermatitis among workers offer clues about risk factors and targets for prevention, but population-based estimates of the burden of dermatitis among US workers are lacking. Methods: Data from an occupational health supplement to the 2010 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS-OHS) were used to estimate the prev...
Article
Objective: Assess the national prevalence of current workplace exposure to potential skin hazards, secondhand smoke (SHS), and outdoor work among various industry and occupation groups. Also, assess the national prevalence of chronic workplace exposure to vapors, gas, dust, and fumes (VGDF) among these groups. Methods: Data were obtained from th...
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Surveillance is needed to capture work organization characteristics and to identify their trends. Data from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were used to calculate prevalence rates for four work organization characteristics (long work hours, non-standard work arrangements, temporary positions, and alternative shifts) overall, and by...
Article
Background: Little nationally representative information on job insecurity, work-family imbalance, and hostile work environments experienced by workers in the US is available. Methods: Prevalence rates from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were calculated for three workplace psychosocial factors (job insecurity, work-family imbal...
Conference Paper
Research suggests that the factors influencing the decision to participate in a survey may also influence the respondent’s motivation and ability to respond to survey questions. If response propensities are positively correlated with respondent effort during the interview, the participation of reluctant respondents may reduce the quality of estimat...
Conference Paper
This presentation will describe the types of data collected by the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). Data collection methods, analytic considerations, and methods of data access will be discussed. Examples of how the NHIS data are used to inform public health programs and policy will be provided. Participants will also learn ways of applying...
Conference Paper
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Quality control is paramount to surveys for which the U.S. Census Bureau is the data collection agent. Two methods currently used to measure data quality are the Performance and Data Analysis (PANDA) system and Quality Control (QC) Reinterview. PANDA uses CAPI trace files, data files, and other case information (e.g., interview date and time) as in...
Chapter
Introduction What are Field Tests? Why Should Field Tests be Conducted? The Federal Context: Standards and Review Process for Federal Surveys Some Uses of Field Tests by Federal Agencies What are the Weaknesses of Field Tests? Paradata Analysis as an Alternative or Complement to Field Tests Conclusion Notes References
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We hypothesize that a substantial portion of individuals who forgo conventional care in a given year turn to some form of alternative medicine. This study also examines whether individuals who use only alternative medicine will differ substantially in health and sociodemographic status from individuals using neither alternative medicine nor convent...
Article
Using newly available paradata, this article explores the use of "doorstep concerns" to predict interim and final refusals in the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). Using ten weeks of automated contact history records, we analyze privacy and burden concerns but also examine other verbal and nonverbal interactions recorded by interviewers duri...
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Using paradata and health data from the National Health Interview Survey, we explore the associations between respondent mentions of "too busy," "not interested," and "privacy concerns" at first contact and item nonresponse and the amount of time devoted to the survey task. Mentions of "not interested" were consistently associated with less time sp...
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Surveys have generally found that individuals more likely to use complementary and alternative medicine are female, live in the western United States, are likely to have a health complaint, and have a higher socioeconomic status than do nonusers. What is not known is the extent to which those who use complementary and alternative medicine also enga...
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1 Abstract2 Using survey and contact attempt history data collected with the 2005 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), a multi- purpose health survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), we set out to explore the impact of participant concerns/reluctance on data quality...
Article
This paper examines long-term recovery outcomes of businesses impacted by major natural disasters. Data were collected via two large-scale mail surveys—one administered to Santa Cruz County, California businesses 8 years after the Loma Prieta earthquake and the other administered to businesses in South Dade County, Florida, 6 years after Hurricane...
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Through five systematic, large-scale mail surveys conducted since 1993, the Disaster Research Center (DRC) has obtained data on hazard awareness, preparedness, disaster impacts, and short- and long-term recovery among 5,000 private-sector firms in communities across the United States (Memphis/Shelby County, Tennessee, Des Moines, Iowa, Los Angeles,...
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Spurred in part by the rising economic costs of natural disasters, there has recently been a dramatic increase in the number of studies aimed at estimating financial losses caused by large-scale earthquakes. For example, in 1997 the journal Earthquake Spectra devoted an entire issue to this topic. Papers appearing in the special issue ranged from c...
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Although the long-term effects of disasters and the factors that affect the ability to recover have received increasing attention from social science researchers, little systematic research has been conducted on the processes and outcomes associated with business disaster recovery. This paper attempts to fill that void by exploring the determinants...
Article
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Although there has been a proliferation of "how to" planning guides in recent years, there has been very little documentation of the variation in and determinants of business disaster preparedness. The few studies that have been conducted have focused on specific firms or industrial sectors, such as the chemical or tourist industry, or have been pl...
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The ways in which private businesses are affected by and attempt to recover from earthquakes and other disasters have seldom been addressed empirically. Research findings on the business impacts of disasters have generally been based on data from individual case studies or from a limited number of firms, rather than on large-scale surveys, and stud...
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While the long-term effects of disaster and the factors that affect the ability to recover have received increasing attention by social science researchers, the majority of research to date has taken families and households as the units of analysis, with a smaller number of studies focusing on the recovery of entire communities. The processes and o...
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Using core survey, frame, and contact history data collected with the 2005 NHIS, a multi-purpose health survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a model of initial contact was developed and tested. Attempt-level, household-level, and social environmental measures were al...
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Abstract, The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), a computer,assisted personal ,interview ,(CAPI) survey administered annually by the ,National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, collects data on family income, but virtually no data on wealth. Yet research has identified a strong, separate association bet...
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In 2004, the U.S. Census Bureau introduced an automated instrument to collect contact history paradata in personal-visit surveys. Survey methodologists analyze these data to improve, manage and evaluate surveys, for example, to plan contact strategies, predict survey nonresponse and assess nonresponse bias. But while the paradata literature is grow...
Article
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While the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) household and family response rates remain high (87% in 2007), the sample adult response rate has dropped to under 70%. Since critical health information is collected from sample adults, more attention should be given to their participation rates and the potential for bias in key health estimates. I...
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Minimizing survey error requires adherence to the accepted principles and best practices of survey research. Interviewers can be a significant source of error that is difficult to control. Ensuring that interviewers execute their jobs properly requires that they be well-trained, monitored, and provided feedback. In this paper, we discuss new proced...
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The growing significance of organizations as actors in modern urban communities is by now a well known fact. As Turk (1970) suggests, modern society can be viewed as an aggregate of organizations which appear, disappear, change, merge, and form networks of relations with each other. This perspective provides a useful tool for understanding how soci...
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Although a great deal of attention has been given to the conditions which give rise to rumors, the conditions necessary for transmission, and processes of rumor transmission, little attention has been paid to the factors that distinguish between rumorers and non-rumorers, as well as rumor believers and non-believers. Employing data from a survey of...
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Although the long-term effects of disasters and the factors that affect the ability to recover have received a great deal of attention recently, the recovery literature is limited and uneven in terms of the units of analysis studied and the research findings. Nigg and Tierney (1990) note that the majority of empirical studies on recovery have taken...
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To be effective, earthquake loss reduction policies must be based on an understanding of the range of impacts earthquakes produce. These impacts include not only deaths, injuries, and direct physical damage to the built environment, but also indirect impacts, including losses resulting from the economic disruption earthquakes engender. To anticipat...
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While a great number of studies in the field of disaster research have focused on the preparedness activities of individuals, households, and public sector organizations, few empirical analyses of business disaster preparedness have been conducted. In his exhaustive review of the disaster literature, Drabek (1986) noted "the entire matter of disast...

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