James Buckley

James Buckley
University of Plymouth | UoP · School of Biological Sciences

BSc Biology (Hons)

About

17
Publications
3,609
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279
Citations
Introduction
I am interested in understanding how organisms will adapt to environmental change, particularly changes in interactions with other species. My research uses intraspecific variation in traits associated with interactions among plants and invertebrates or pathogens, as a proxy for understanding how such systems will respond to future changes in their environment. I have integrated data from genomics, metabolomics, field observational studies and lab and field experiments, using a range of study systems, in order to identify the adaptive traits underlying these interactions. Given that future climate change might substantially alter plant-invertebrate interactions, I think such knowledge is critical to predict those organisms most at risk from changing biotic environments.
Additional affiliations
July 2020 - present
University of Plymouth
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Lecturer in Ecology - just starting out!
May 2015 - present
ETH Zurich
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2011 - February 2015
University of Glasgow
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
Plants can detect cues associated with the risk of future herbivory and modify defence phenotypes accordingly; however, our current understanding is limited both with respect to the range of early warning cues to which plants respond and the nature of the responses. Here we report that exposure to volatile emissions from plant tissues infested with...
Article
Selfing plant lineages are surprisingly widespread and successful in a broad range of environments, despite showing reduced genetic diversity, which is predicted to reduce their long-term evolutionary potential. However, appropriate short-term plastic responses to new environmental conditions might not require high levels of standing genetic variat...
Article
Full-text available
Alpine plants occurring at high elevation are vulnerable to ongoing climate change, yet relatively little is known about the potential for high‐elevation species to adapt to changing environmental conditions. In particular, the extent to which high‐elevation plants will be able to resist predicted increases in the intensity of biotic interactions,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Selfing plant lineages are surprisingly widespread and successful in a broad range of environments, despite showing reduced genetic diversity, which is predicted to reduce long-term evolutionary potential. However, short-term capacity to respond appropriately to new conditions might not require high levels of standing genetic variation. The purpose...
Article
Full-text available
Variation in local herbivore pressure along elevation gradients is predicted to drive variation in plant defense traits. Yet, the extent of intraspecific variation in defense investment along elevation gradients, and its effects on both herbivore preference and performance, remain relatively unexplored. Using populations of Arabidopsis halleri (Bra...
Article
Full-text available
Background Genome scans based on outlier analyses have revolutionized detection of genes involved in adaptive processes, but reports of some forms of selection, such as balancing selection, are still limited. It is unclear whether high throughput genotyping approaches for identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms have sufficient power to de...
Article
Recent recognition that ecological and evolutionary processes can operate on similar time scales has led to a rapid increase in theoretical and empirical studies on eco-evolutionary dynamics. Progress in the fields of evolutionary biology, genomics, and ecology is greatly enhancing our understanding of rapid adaptive processes, the predictability o...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Examining allelic variation of R-genes in closely related perennial species of Arabidopsis thaliana is critical to understanding how population structure and ecology interact with selection to shape the evolution of innate immunity in plants. We finely sampled natural populations of Arabidopsis lyrata from the Great Lakes region of Nort...
Article
Full-text available
The changes in species' geographical distribution demanded by climate change are often critically limited by the availability of key interacting species. In such cases, species' persistence will depend on the rapid evolution of biotic interactions. Understanding evolutionary limits to such adaptation is therefore crucial for predicting biological r...
Article
Full-text available
Generalist species and phenotypes are expected to perform best under rapid environmental change. In contrast to this view that generalists will inherit the Earth, we find that increased use of a single host plant is associated with the recent climate-driven range expansion of the UK brown argus butterfly. Field assays of female host plant preferenc...
Article
Full-text available
Poleward range expansions are widespread responses to recent climate change and are crucial for the future persistence of many species. However, evolutionary change in traits such as colonization history and habitat preference may also be necessary to track environmental change across a fragmented landscape. Understanding the likelihood and speed o...
Article
Full-text available
When species shift their ranges to track climate change, they are almost certain to experience novel environments to which they are poorly adapted. Otaki and co-workers document an explosion of wing pattern variation accompanying range expansion in the pale grass blue butterfly. This pattern can be replicated in the laboratory using artificial sele...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Mountains expose species to rapid changes in the abiotic and biotic environment over short spatial scales. Species distributed across such gradients are therefore useful for testing the potential of a species to adapt to environmental change. This project aims to understand how predictable changes in key traits and interactions are among populations along these broad elevation gradients.