James P Bernot

James P Bernot
Smithsonian Institution · Department of Invertebrate Zoology

PhD
NSF postdoc at Smithsonian NMNH & Senckenberg working on crustacean genomics, parasite evolution, and copepod taxonomy

About

18
Publications
2,743
Reads
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62
Citations
Introduction
My research is centered on parasite evolution, crustacean genomics, and copepod taxonomy and systematics. I use molecular and morphological approaches to study invertebrate evolution in a robust molecular phylogenetic context. I enjoy exploring multiple elements of host-parasite interactions in a variety of parasite groups including tapeworms and nematodes, but my primary focus is on parasitic copepods.
Additional affiliations
August 2016 - December 2020
George Washington University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Parasitology BISC 2339 TA each Fall semester
September 2015 - December 2020
George Washington University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • HealthCare Informatics Administrator and Trainer. Responsibilities include study design and database administration for healthcare tools like REDCap and ResearchMatch. I also teach monthly healthcare informatics training courses on these tools to staff at GWU, GW Hospital, GW MFA, and Children's National Hospital.
September 2015 - December 2020
Smithsonian Institution
Position
  • Research Associate
Description
  • Smithsonian Fellow at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History working with Dr. Anna Phillips (Research Zoologist). I am involved in research and public outreach at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC
Education
August 2015 - December 2020
George Washington University
Field of study
  • Genomics and Bioinformatics
August 2012 - August 2015
University of Connecticut
Field of study
  • Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
August 2008 - August 2012
University of Connecticut
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
A 2016 collaborative survey of commercial fish parasites in Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia led to the discovery of two new species of parasitic copepods belonging to the family Bomolochidae. Females of Nothobomolochus johndaveorum n. sp. were found attached to the gill filaments of Gerres subfasciatus and Gerres oyena. The new species most clos...
Article
Free-living nematodes respond to variable and unpredictable environmental stimuli whereas parasitic nematodes exist in a more stable host environment. A positive correlation between the presence of environmental stages in the nematode life cycle and an increasing number of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) reflects this difference in free-living...
Article
Full-text available
The Copepoda is a clade of pancrustaceans containing 14,485 species that are extremely varied in their morphology and lifestyle. Not only do copepods dominate marine plankton and sediment communities and make up a sizeable component of the freshwater plankton, but over 6,000 species are symbiotically associated with every major phylum of marine met...
Article
Full-text available
Background The barnacles are a group of >2,000 species that have fascinated biologists, including Darwin, for centuries. Their lifestyles are extremely diverse, from free-swimming larvae to sessile adults, and even root-like endoparasites. Barnacles also cause hundreds of millions of dollars of losses annually due to biofouling. However, genomic re...
Article
Full-text available
Both sexes of a new species of pandarid copepod are described from sharks of the genus Squalus L. (Squaliformes: Squalidae). Specimens of Pseudopandarus cairae n. sp. were collected from Squalus bucephalus Last, Séret & Pogonoski and S. melanurus Fourmanoir & Rivaton in New Caledonian waters, the first parasitic copepod to be described from either...
Article
Teaching biology laboratories remotely presents unique problems and challenges for instructors. Microscopic examination of specimens, as is common in parasitology labs, is especially difficult given the limited quantity of teaching specimens and the need for each student to have access to a microscope at their remote location. Observing images of p...
Article
Supporting data for the manuscript "Chromosome-level genome assembly, annotation, and phylogenomics of the gooseneck barnacle Pollicipes pollicipes" https://doi.org/10.1093/gigascience/giac021 This includes the genome sequence and annotation (from NCBI) as well as all BUSCO results, alignments, phylogenetic trees, read counts, and differential gen...
Article
Background Black Americans have a higher incidence and mortality rate from colorectal cancer compared to their non-Hispanic White American counterparts. Even when controlling for sociodemographic differences between these 2 populations, Black Americans remain disproportionately affected by colorectal cancer. The purpose of our study was to determin...
Article
Full-text available
LgDel mice, which model the heterozygous deletion of genes at human chromosome 22q11.2 associated with DiGeorge/22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), have cranial nerve and craniofacial dysfunction as well as disrupted suckling, feeding and swallowing, similar to key 22q11DS phenotypes. Divergent trigeminal nerve (CN V) differentiation and altered t...
Article
The total number of species of Lernanthropidae previously recorded from Australian waters is 15 (i.e., one species each of Aethon Krøyer, 1837, Lernanthropodes Bere, 1936, and Lernanthropsis Do, in Ho & Do, 1985; 10 species of Lernanthropus de Blainville, 1822; and two species of Sagum Wilson, 1913), and all of these records are reviewed. We report...
Article
Full-text available
LgDel mice, which model the heterozygous deletion of genes at human chromosome 22q11.2 associated with DiGeorge/22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS), have cranial nerve and craniofacial dysfunction as well as disrupted suckling, feeding, and swallowing, similar to key 22q11DS phenotypes. Divergent trigeminal nerve (CN V) differentiation and altered...
Article
Bronchiolitis is the leading cause of hospitalizations among infants in the U.S. Two major respiratory viruses—respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus (RV)—account for 85% of severe bronchiolitis (bronchiolitis resulting in hospitalization). While bronchiolitis has been considered a single disease entity and currently available management...
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies suggest that cestodes (i.e., tapeworms) of the sister genera Symcallio and Calliobothrium attach in different specific regions of the spiral intestine of their triakid shark hosts, with species of Symcallio attaching in the anterior region of the spiral intestine and species of Calliobothrium attaching with a broader distribution c...
Article
Full-text available
Salinity gradients are critical habitat determinants for freshwater organisms. Silverside fishes in the genus Odontesthes have recently and repeatedly transitioned from marine to freshwater habitats, overcoming a strong ecological barrier. Genomic and transcrip-tomic changes involved in this kind of transition are only known for a few model species...
Article
The laciniate, relatively large-bodied tetraphyllidean tapeworm genus Calliobothrium van Beneden, 1850 parasitises triakid sharks with all but one species found parasitising sharks of the genus Mustelus Linck, 1790. Historically, species of this genus were thought to exhibit a relaxed degree of host specificity relative to species of their sister g...
Article
This paper aims to resolve the dual composition of the triakid shark-hosted tetraphyllidean genus Calliobothrium-an issue that has been recognized for over a decade. As it stands, this genus includes a number of large species with laciniate proglottids, most of which bear 3 suckers at the anterior margin of each bothridium, but it also includes a n...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Marine parasites are key components of natural ecosystems and significant pathogens of commercial species. Despite their importance, they remain poorly studied in Australia. This Australian Biological Resources Study funded project focuses on the parasites of commercially important fishes of Moreton Bay (Queensland) with the aims of improving the understanding of parasites from a commercial perspective (product quality, pathogenesis, value in stock assessment, human health and environmental monitoring) and improving our taxonomic understanding of a poorly understood component of the Australian fauna.
Project
The goals of this project are to catalogue the diversity of cestodes that parasitize triakid sharks, and better understand their biology and evolutionary relationships. I am focusing on describing new species, elucidating host relationships, and generating phylogenies using molecular data for two tapeworm genera in particular: Calliobothrium and Symcallio. I am also exploring the mechanisms by which these worms attach to their hosts and examining other potential drivers of host and attachment site specificity.