Jalene M. LaMontagne

Jalene M. LaMontagne
DePaul University · Biological Sciences

Ph.D.

About

54
Publications
12,926
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,066
Citations
Introduction
My lab studies macrosystems biology and global change. We study population dynamics over space & time, with a particular focus on patterns of reproduction in trees (primarily conifers), consumer-resource dynamics, impacts of climate change on plant reproduction, and how urbanization and land-use influences patterns of habitat availability (focusing on tree-cavity availability), population dynamics, and animal behaviour. Keywords: Population ecology, mast seeding, climate change, urban ecology
Additional affiliations
April 2007 - June 2009
The University of Calgary
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2001 - February 2007
University of Alberta
Position
  • PhD
September 1998 - September 2000
The University of Calgary
Position
  • Master’s Degree

Publications

Publications (54)
Article
Mast seeding, or masting, is the highly variable and spatially synchronous production of seeds bya population of plants. The production of variable seed crops is typically correlated with weather, so it is of considerable interest whether global climate change has altered the variability ofmasting or the size ofmasting events. We compiled 1086 data...
Article
Full-text available
1.Synchronous pulses of seed masting and natural disturbance have positive feedbacks on the reproduction of masting species in disturbance‐prone ecosystems. We test the hypotheses that disturbances and proximate causes of masting are correlated, and that their large‐scale synchrony is driven by similar climate teleconnection patterns at both inter‐...
Article
Full-text available
Mast seeding is one of the most intriguing reproductive traits in nature. Despite its potential drawbacks in terms of fitness, the widespread existence of this phenomenon suggests that it should have evolutionary advantages under certain circumstances. Using a global dataset of seed production time series for 219 plant species from all of the conti...
Article
Full-text available
Resource pulses are rare events with a short duration and high magnitude that drive the dynamics of both plant and animal populations and communities¹. Mast seeding is perhaps the most common type of resource pulse that occurs in terrestrial ecosystems², is characterized by the synchronous and highly variable production of seed crops by a populatio...
Article
Mast seeding is a widespread reproductive phenomenon in plants, and testing evolutionary drivers is challenging. New research uses four decades of individual-tree reproduction data and demonstrates selection for hypersensitivity to a weather cue, high temporal variability, and high synchrony with neighbours.
Article
Full-text available
Understanding patterns and drivers of species distribution and abundance, and thus biodiversity, is a core goal of ecology. Despite advances in recent decades, research into these patterns and processes is currently limited by a lack of standardized, high‐quality, empirical data that span large spatial scales and long time periods. The NEON fills t...
Article
Full-text available
Lack of tree fecundity data across climatic gradients precludes the analysis of how seed supply contributes to global variation in forest regeneration and biotic interactions responsible for biodiversity. A global synthesis of raw seedproduction data shows a 250‐fold increase in seed abundance from cold‐dry to warm‐wet climates, driven primarily by...
Article
Full-text available
The relationships that control seed production in trees are fundamental to understanding the evolution of forest species and their capacity to recover from increasing losses to drought, fire, and harvest. A synthesis of fecundity data from 714 species worldwide allowed us to examine hypotheses that are central to quantifying reproduction, a foundat...
Article
Urbanization transforms environments in ways that alter biological evolution. We examined whether urban environmental change drives parallel evolution by sampling 110,019 white clover plants from 6169 populations in 160 cities globally. Plants were assayed for a Mendelian antiherbivore defense that also affects tolerance to abiotic stressors. Urban...
Article
Eastern spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) is a native defoliating insect in Canada and the United States that has large impacts on forest health. Balsam fir (Abies balsamea) and white spruce (Picea glauca) are its primary host trees, where budworm larvae consume buds and needles during larval development. While Eastern spruce budworm consum...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the drivers of community stability in times of increasing anthropogenic pressure is an urgent issue. Biodiversity is known to promote community stability, but studies of the biodiversity–stability relationship rarely consider the full complexity of biodiversity change. Furthermore, finding generalities that hold across taxonomic group...
Article
Full-text available
Significant gaps remain in understanding the response of plant reproduction to environmental change. This is partly because measuring reproduction in long-lived plants requires direct observation over many years and such datasets have rarely been made publicly available. Here we introduce MASTREE+, a dataset that collates reproductive time-series d...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Suitable habitats for forest trees may be shifting fast with recent climate change. Studies tracking the shift in suitable habitat for forests have been inconclusive, in part because responses in tree fecundity and seedling establishment can diverge. Analysis of both components at a continental scale reveals a poleward migration of nor...
Article
Full-text available
Larval Gray Tiger Salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum diaboli) that inhabit saline ponds in the Prairie Pothole Region of Canada provided us the opportunity to study the osmotic strategy used by amphibians to survive in elevated salinity environments. To better understand the osmotic and metabolic challenges these larvae face, we investigated the effec...
Article
Our overall objective is to synthesize mast-seeding data on North American Pinaceae to detect characteristic features of reproduction (i.e. development cycle length, serotiny, dispersal agents), and test for patterns in temporal variation based on weather variables. We use a large dataset ( n = 286 time series; mean length = 18.9 years) on crop siz...
Article
Full-text available
It is a critical time to reflect on the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) science to date as well as envision what research can be done right now with NEON (and other) data and what training is needed to enable a diverse user community. NEON became fully operational in May 2019 and has pivoted from planning and construction to operatio...
Article
Full-text available
The arboreal ecosystem is vitally important to global and local biogeochemical processes, the maintenance of biodiversity in natural systems, and human health in urban environments. The ability to collect samples, observations, and data to conduct meaningful scientific research is similarly vital. The primary methods and modes of access remain limi...
Article
Full-text available
The arboreal ecosystem is vitally important to global and local biogeochemical processes, the maintenance of biodiversity in natural systems, and human health in urban environments. The ability to collect samples, observations, and data to conduct meaningful scientific research is similarly vital. The primary methods and modes of access remain limi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding patterns and drivers of species distributions and abundances, and thus biodiversity, is a core goal of ecology. Despite advances in recent decades, research into these patterns and processes is currently limited by a lack of standardized, high-quality, empirical data that spans large spatial scales and long time periods. The National...
Article
Despite its importance for forest regeneration, food webs, and human economies, changes in tree fecundity with tree size and age remain largely unknown. The allometric increase with tree diameter assumed in ecological models would substantially overestimate seed contributions from large trees if fecundity eventually declines with size. Current esti...
Article
Populations of many tree species exhibit synchronous and highly temporally variable seed crops across years. This is called mast seeding, and there are two predominant hypotheses for this pattern of reproduction, pollination efficiency and seed-predator satiation. Mast seeding studies typically involve records of population-level reproduction, with...
Article
Full-text available
A Correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-22025-2
Article
Mast seeding in conifers is characterized by the spatially synchronous and temporally variable production of seed cone crops. Large mast seeding events (known as “mast years”) can be a visually stunning and ecologically important phenomenon, supporting trophic interactions and survival of seed predators as well as forest regeneration. Documenting p...
Article
Full-text available
Indirect climate effects on tree fecundity that come through variation in size and growth (climate-condition interactions) are not currently part of models used to predict future forests. Trends in species abundances predicted from meta-analyses and species distribution models will be misleading if they depend on the conditions of individuals. Here...
Article
European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in North America often achieve high densities in urban regions and compete with other cavity-nesting species for nest sites, including the rapidly declining red-headed woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus). However, at a continental scale, European starling populations are unrelated to trends in red-headed wo...
Article
Full-text available
The resource budget model for mast seeding hypothesizes that soil nutrients proximately influence reproduction. Plants in high soil nutrient (particularly N) areas are predicted to have lower reproductive variability over time and higher mean reproduction. While often examined theoretically, there are relatively few empirical tests of this hypothes...
Article
Full-text available
In his recent communication on our original paper 1,2 , D. Kelly, claiming that nutrient scarcity cannot select for masting behaviour in plants, initiated a fruitful discussion on traditionally settled hypotheses about the evolution of reproductive behaviour in plants. In his commentary, Kelly raises support for a contrasting hypothesis explaining...
Article
Interannual variability of seed crops (CVp) has profound consequences for plant populations and food webs, where high CVp is termed ‘masting’. Here we ask: is global variation in CVp better predicted by plant or habitat differences consistent with adaptive economies of scale, in which flower and seed benefits increase disproportionately during mast...
Article
Ecological processes, such as migration and phenology, are strongly influenced by climate variability. Studying these processes often relies on associating observations of animals and plants with climate indices, such as the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO). A common characteristic of climate indices is the simultaneous emergence of opposite ext...
Article
Full-text available
Seed distribution and deposition patterns around parent trees are strongly affected by functional traits and therefore influence the development of plant communities. To assess the limitations of seed dispersal and the extent to which diaspore and neighbouring parental traits explain seed rain, we used a 9-year seed data set based on 150 seed traps...
Article
Moon snail predation on clams is a common model system of predator–prey interactions. In this system, the predator bores through the shell of its prey, leaving a distinct and identifiable hole. Some paleoecological and behavioral research on moon snails suggests a trend in predation preference directed toward clams with small shells. Rarely, howeve...
Article
Full-text available
Tree cavities provide shelter, nesting sites and food storage for many species of birds, mammals and insects. While tree cavities are present in a variety of habitats, most prior research focuses on forests, with fewer studies completed in urban areas. However, city parks provide some habitat, and cemeteries may also provide adequate, or even bette...
Article
Full-text available
Population fluctuations can be affected by both extrinsic (e.g. weather patterns, food availability) and intrinsic (e.g. life-history) factors. A key life-history tradeoff is the production of offspring size versus number, ranging from many small offspring to few large offspring. Models show that this life-history tradeoff in offspring size and num...
Article
Full-text available
Overfishing of top predators along the western Atlantic coastline has led to a trophic cascade in salt marshes, with increases in herbivorous purple marsh crab (Sesarma reticulatum (Say, 1817)) abundances in North American estuaries leading to overgrazing of cordgrass (Spartina alternifloraLoisel.) and shoreline erosion. To evaluate potential physi...
Article
Full-text available
Mast seeding, synchronous highly variable seed production among years, occurs in many perennial plant species and across diverse plant communities. Two predominant ultimate hypotheses for mast seeding are pollination efficiency and predator satiation, with weather conditions as a proximate cause. Little consensus has been achieved regarding the rel...
Article
Full-text available
Forest habitat is important for a variety of woodpecker species, and is under pressure from urbanization. Red-headed Woodpeckers (Melanerpes erythrocephalus; RHWO) were once abundant across Eastern North America, and their populations have been declining since the 1960s. Their distribution encompasses urban centers, and since urban habitats differ...
Article
Full-text available
Tree cavities are used by a wide variety of species for nesting, food storage, and cover. Most studies on cavity availability have been conducted in forests, and little is known about urban areas. With urbanization, species that excavate cavities may be less abundant, natural tree-decay processes are managed, and tree densities are reduced, all of...
Article
Full-text available
In territorial species, competitive asymmetries can result in the uneven distribution of food resources as high-quality individuals force young or subordinates to occupy smaller or lower-quality sites, or both. However, spatiotemporal variation in the production of resources also can influence an individual's ability to monopolize resources and, co...
Article
White spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) cone crops were measured from 1986 to 2011 in the Kluane region of southwestern Yukon to test the hypothesis that the size of cone crops could be predicted from spring and summer temperature and rainfall of years t, t – 1, and t – 2. We counted cones in the top 3 m of an average of 700 white spruce trees ea...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated pond habitat use by trumpeter swans (Cygnus buccinator) at spring migration stopover areas in southern Alberta in 1999 and 2000. Spring migration stopover areas may be critical to gaining energy stores required for successful breeding, but no studies of trumpeter swan migration habitat have previously been published. We conducted co...
Article
Full-text available
Mast seeding involves the episodic and synchronous production of large seed crops by perennial plants. The predator satiation hypothesis proposes that mast seeding maximizes seed escape because seed predators consume a decreasing proportion of available seeds with increasing seed production. However, the seed escape benefits of masting depend not o...
Article
Full-text available
Petroleum-sector development in northern Alberta, Canada has been implicated as one factor influencing the decline of boreal woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou). Previous research showed that caribou are farther from petroleum-sector disturbances within their home range than expected. As petroleum development increases, the distance caribo...
Article
Although there is a quantitative method that is commonly used for identifying mast-seeding behaviour of a plant population based on the coefficient of variation (i.e. CV is standard deviation/mean>1), there is no general quantitative method for delineating “mast” as opposed to “non-mast” years. Mast years are, however, described qualitatively as ye...
Article
1. Mast seeding is the synchronous and highly variable production of seed by a population of plants. Mast seeding results from the behaviour of individuals; however, little is known about the synchrony of individuals at local scales. 2. We address two primary questions at a within-population (17-36 ha study plots) and individual level: (i) How vari...
Article
Full-text available
Maternal effects can have lasting fitness consequences for offspring, but these effects are often difficult to disentangle from associated responses in offspring traits. We studied persistent maternal effects on offspring survival in North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) by manipulating maternal nutrition without altering the post-...
Article
Full-text available
We report the novel occurrence of North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) feeding on spruce bark beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) larvae, and consider the energetic and ecological implications. Although a bark beetle outbreak was 1st noted at our study site in 1994, significant feeding on them by red squirrels was not observed until...
Article
Full-text available
The number of cones produced by coniferous trees is commonly estimated by visual counts from the ground of a portion of the tree multiplied by a simple conversion factor. Linear conversion factors have been used to estimate total cone production by white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss). However, these conversion factors originate from other con...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated whether trumpeter swans (Cygnus buccinator) gain energy from forage in excess of estimated daily demands while present in a spring migration stopover area west of Calgary, Alberta. We estimated energy budgets from activity time budgets of 443 individual focal-animal observations. We conducted exclosure experiments in ponds used by t...
Article
We examined spring pond use by migrating trumpeter swans (Cygnus buccinator) to assess their short-term impact on tuber and rhizome density and biomass, and to evaluate the impact of spring foraging on summer macrophyte biomass and species composition. Trumpeter swans in the Canadian subpopulation of the Rocky Mountain population select ponds that...
Article
Full-text available
1Population viability analyses (PVAs) are commonly used to identify species of concern. Many PVA techniques assume that all populations are regulated by a single mechanism.2We compared population viability predictions for three subspecies of sage grouse ( Centrocercus spp.) based on the assumptions that: (i) population regulation was density-indepe...
Article
Full-text available
The use of breeding and wintering areas has been a focus of studies on trumpeter swans (Cygnus buccinator), but the importance of migration stopover areas has been overlooked. We conducted a behavioural study to assess trumpeter swans' use of spring-migration stopover areas in southern Alberta, Canada. Adult swans foraged for 48% of the day, preene...
Article
Maternal effects can significantly impact offspring performance. Provisioning of offspring with energy stores can quantitatively alter their growth rates, survivorship, and future fecundity, and influence population regulatory mechanisms. In this paper, we show that maternal effects can also qualitatively affect offspring reproduction (i.e. their m...
Article
Thesis (M. Sc.)--University of Calgary, 2000. Includes bibliographical references.

Network

Cited By