Jakob Fahr

Jakob Fahr
Max Planck Institute for Ornithology · Department of Migration and Immuno-ecology

PhD

About

157
Publications
33,289
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
2,358
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2011 - present
Max-Planck-Institut für Ornithologie, Teilinstitut Radolfzell
Position
  • Researcher
January 2001 - August 2010
Ulm University
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (157)
Article
Full-text available
International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) expert maps are increasingly used in macroecological research. However, they have not been produced for this purpose. Macroecological insights based exclusively on this type of data could therefore be misleading. Here we compare, for a large taxonomic group (bats) and an entire biogeographical r...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Straw-coloured fruit bats (Eidolon helvum) migrate over vast distances across the African continent, probably following seasonal bursts of resource availability. This causes enormous fluctuations in population size, which in turn may influence the bats’ impact on local ecosystems. We studied the movement ecology of this central-place fo...
Article
Full-text available
Bats are the second-most species-rich mammal group numbering more than 1270 species globally. Our knowledge of their geographic distributions and diversity patterns however is very limited – possibly the poorest among mammals – mainly due to their nocturnal and volant life history, and challenging fieldwork conditions in the tropics where most bat...
Article
Full-text available
It is widely accepted that species diversity is contingent upon the spatial scale used to analyze patterns and processes. Recent studies using coarse sampling grains over large extents have contributed much to our understanding of factors driving global diversity patterns. This advance is largely unmatched on the level of local to landscape scales...
Article
Full-text available
Rhinolophus ziama n. sp. from the Upper Guinea highlands in Guinea and Liberia is described. This new taxon differs from R. maclaudi in being significantly smaller in size, and from R. ruwenzorii and R. hilli by skull shape and noseleaf morphology. These four related species are allocated to the formally established R. maclaudi group. A published r...
Article
Full-text available
Migrating grazers and carnivores respond to seasonal changes in the environment and often match peaks in resource abundance. However, it is unclear if and how frugivorous animals use phenological events to time migration, especially in the tropics. The straw‐colored fruit bat (Eidolon helvum), Africa’s most gregarious fruit bat, forms large seasona...
Article
Full-text available
The disturbance of wildlife by humans is a worldwide phenomenon that contributes to the loss of biodiversity. It can impact animals' behaviour and physiology, and this can lead to changes in species distribution and richness. Wildlife disturbance has mostly been assessed through direct observation. However, advances in bio-logging provide a new ran...
Article
Full-text available
Intraspecific competition in large aggregations of animals should generate density-dependent effects on foraging patterns. To test how large differences in colony size affect foraging movements, we tracked seasonal movements of the African straw-coloured fruit bat (Eidolon helvum) from four colonies that range from 4000 up to 10 million animals. Co...
Article
Two species of the monogeneric family Nycteridae were studied for the first time with chromosome banding techniques and chromosome painting. The diploid chromosome number of Nycteris macrotis and N. tragata is 40 and 38, respectively. Both karyotypes differ by a translocation, a telomeric fusion and a pericentric inversion. The genus Nycteris shows...
Article
Full-text available
Atmospheric conditions impact how animals use the aerosphere, and birds and bats should modify their flight to minimise energetic expenditure relative to changing wind conditions. To investigate how free-ranging straw-coloured fruit bats (Eidolon helvum) fly with changing wind support, we use data collected from bats fit with GPS loggers and an int...
Article
Animal-mediated seed dispersal is a pivotal component of functioning forest ecosystems all over the globe. Animals that disperse seeds away from their parental plants increase the seeds’ chances of survival by releasing them from competition and specialised predators and so contribute to maintain the biodiversity of forests. Furthermore, seeds disp...
Article
Full-text available
Bats are suspected to be a reservoir of several bacterial and viral pathogens relevant to animal and human health, but studies on Escherichia coli in these animals are sparse. We investigated the presence of E. coli in tissue samples (liver, lung and intestines) collected from 50 fruit bats of five different species (Eidolon helvum, Epomops franque...
Article
Full-text available
To improve data availability and exchange in the area of the WAP complex, West Africa's largest continuous area of reserves, we set up a citizen science project on the iNaturalist platform, allowing contribution of observations, ideally documented by photographs and/or sounds. Along with the project we created a number of online field guides for th...
Article
Full-text available
On-going fragmentation of tropical forest ecosystems and associated depletion of seed dispersers threatens the long-term survival of animal-dispersed plants. These threats do not only affect biodiversity and species abundance, but ultimately ecosystem functions and services. Thus, seed dispersers such as the straw-coloured fruit bat, E. helvum, whi...
Article
Full-text available
Hunting and loss of natural habitats increasingly threaten tropical biodiversity and ecosystems, particularly in Southeast Asia. Flying foxes often persist in anthropogenic areas where other wildlife has vanished, and where they play a significant ecological role in vegetation regeneration in disturbed habitats. Detailed knowledge on the foraging b...
Article
Full-text available
Undersampling is commonplace in biodiversity surveys of species-rich tropical assemblages in which rare taxa abound, with possible repercussions for our ability to implement surveys and monitoring programmes in a cost-effective way. We investigated the consequences of information loss due to species undersampling (missing subsets of species from th...
Article
Full-text available
The severe Ebola virus disease epidemic occurring in West Africa stems from a single zoonotic transmission event to a 2-year-old boy in Meliandou, Guinea. We investigated the zoonotic origins of the epidemic using wildlife surveys, inter-views, and molecular analyses of bat and environmental samples. We found no evidence for a concurrent outbreak i...
Article
Full-text available
Many regions in Africa are currently being converted from subsistence to cash crop farming such as cotton. Agricultural intensification is usually accompanied by increased use of pesticides, which can have an impact on non-target organisms. Bats are particularly sensitive to insecticide loads while providing substantial ecosystem services as predat...
Article
Full-text available
When animals move, their tracks may be strongly influenced by the motion of air or water, and this may affect the speed, energetics and prospects of the journey. Flying organisms, such as bats, may thus benefit from modifying their flight in response to the wind vector. Yet, practical difficulties have so far limited the understanding of this respo...
Article
Full-text available
Horseshoe bats of the Rhinolophus maclaudi species group were recently revised by Fahr et al. (2002). Known members of the group are located in the mountainous region of West Africa and the Albertine Rift, east of the Congo River basin with a major gap (4300 km) between the two recognized sub-groups. Here we describe two additional species within t...
Article
As the only volant mammals, bats are captivating for their high taxonomic diversity, for their vital roles in ecosystems—particularly as pollinators and insectivores—and, more recently, for their important roles in the maintenance and transmission of zoonotic viral diseases. Genome sequences have identified evidence for a striking expansion of and...
Article
Full-text available
We report the rediscovery of the Pied Butterfly Bat, Glauconycteris superba Hayman, 1939, 40 years after this species was last recorded. The new specimen from Mbiye Island, Democratic Republic of the Congo, is compared with the type specimens of G. s. superba and G. superba sheila Hayman, 1947 and a specimen from Matonguiné, Ivory Coast. The variat...
Chapter
Full-text available