Jake M Martin

Jake M Martin
Monash University (Australia) · School of Biological Sciences, Clayton

PhD (BSc Hons)

About

37
Publications
5,868
Reads
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524
Citations
Citations since 2017
37 Research Items
522 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
Additional affiliations
November 2019 - July 2020
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • PostDoc Position
July 2016 - November 2019
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • Teaching Associate
Description
  • Teaching Associate for Research Methods 'R Statistics' (BIO3011), Animal behaviour (BIO3052), Plant global change biology (BIO3082) and Animal structure and function (BIO2242).
March 2016 - November 2019
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (37)
Article
Pharmaceutical pollutants are detected in aquatic habitats and wildlife tissues globally. One widespread contaminant of major concern is the antidepressant fluoxetine, which can affect behavioural and physiological processes in non-target species. Despite this, effects of fluoxetine on wildlife behaviour have seldom been investigated across multipl...
Article
Pharmaceutical contamination is an increasing problem globally. In this regard, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)—a group of antidepressants—are particularly concerning. By disrupting the serotonergic system, SSRIs have the potential to affect ecologically important behaviors in exposed wildlife. Despite this, the nature and magni...
Article
Psychoactive pollutants, such as antidepressants, are increasingly detected in the environment. Mounting evidence suggests that such pollutants can disrupt the behaviour of non-target species. Despite this, few studies have considered how the response of exposed organisms might be mediated by social context. To redress this, we investigated the imp...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research has found that individuals often vary in how consistently they express their behavior over time (i.e., behavioral predictability) and suggested that these individual differences may be heritable. However, little is known about the intrinsic factors that drive variation in the predictability of behavior. Indeed, whether variation in...
Article
Full-text available
Pharmaceutical pollution represents a rapidly growing threat to ecosystems worldwide. Drugs are now commonly detected in the tissues of wildlife and have the potential to alter the natural expression of behaviour, though relatively little is known about how pharmaceuticals impact predator-prey interactions. We conducted parallel laboratory experime...
Article
Full-text available
Biological invasions are a multi-stage process (i.e., transport, introduction, establishment, spread), with each stage potentially acting as a selective filter on traits associated with invasion success. Behavior (e.g., exploration, activity, boldness) plays a key role in facilitating species introductions, but whether invasion acts as a selective...
Article
Full-text available
The social environment is a key factor that influences behavioural traits across a wide array of species. Yet, when investigating individual differences in behaviour, studies tend to measure animals in isolation from other conspecifics—even in social species. Surprisingly, whether behavioural traits measured in isolation are predictive of individua...
Article
Pollutants, such as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), are increasingly being detected in organisms and ecosystems globally. Agricultural activities, including the use of hormonal growth promotants (HGPs), are a major source of EDC contamination. One potent EDC that enters into the environment through the use of HGPs is 17β-trenbolone. Despite...
Article
Chemical pollution is among the fastest-growing agents of global change. Synthetic chemicals with diverse modes-of-action are being detected in the tissues of wildlife and pervade entire food webs. Although such pollutants can elicit a range of sublethal effects on individual organisms, research on how chemical pollutants affect animal groups is se...
Article
Full-text available
Animal behaviour is remarkably sensitive to disruption by chemical pollution, with widespread implications for ecological and evolutionary processes in contaminated wildlife populations. However, conventional approaches applied to study the impacts of chemical pollutants on wildlife behaviour seldom address the complexity of natural environments in...
Article
Full-text available
Urbanization can compromise biodiversity as cities expand further into native landscapes. The urban heat island (UHI) describes elevated urban temperatures due to heat retained by built structures (e.g. concrete surfaces). Animal behavior may be critical in determining an animal’s ability to thrive in the wake of human disturbance. Yet, we have a r...
Article
Globally, amphibian species are experiencing dramatic population declines, and many face the risk of imminent extinction. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have been recognised as an underappreciated factor contributing to global amphibian declines. In this regard, the use of hormonal growth promotants in the livestock industry provides a direc...
Article
In this Quick guide, Bertram et al. highlight the growing problem of micropollutants - a wide array of natural and synthetic organic compounds found in the environment.
Article
Full-text available
Background Globally, there is growing concern over the impacts of pharmaceuticals and drug manufacturing on aquatic animals, and pharmaceuticals are now recognized as contaminants of emerging environmental concern. In recent years, scientists, environmental managers, and policymakers have been interested in using behavioural endpoints for chemical...
Article
Contamination of the environment by pharmaceutical pollutants poses an increasingly critical threat to aquatic ecosystems around the world. This is particularly true of psychoactive compounds, such as antidepressant drugs, which have become ubiquitous contaminants and have been demonstrated to modify aquatic animal behaviours at very low concentrat...
Article
Within populations, individuals often differ consistently in their average level of behavior (i.e., animal personality), as well as their response to environmental change (i.e., behavioral plasticity). Thus, changes in environmental conditions might be expected to mediate the structure of animal personality traits. However, it is currently not well...
Article
Full-text available
Biological invasions are a prominent example of human-induced environmental change that pose a significant threat to worldwide biodiversity. Recent evidence suggests that behavioural traits play a key role in mediating invasion success. However, little research has investigated how rapidly behavioural traits can change during the initial stages of...
Article
Full-text available
Scientists have warned decision-makers about the severe consequences of the global environmental crisis since the 1970s. Yet ecological degradation con- tinues and little has been done to address climate change. We investigated early-career conservation researchers' (ECR) perspectives on, and prioritization of, actions furthering sustainability. We...
Article
Full-text available
It is now well-established that reproduction in wildlife can be disrupted by anthropogenic environmental changes, such as chemical pollution. However, very little is known about how these pollutants might affect the interplay between pre- and post-copulatory mechanisms of sexual selection. Here, we investigated the impacts of 21-day exposure of mal...
Article
Environmental contamination by pharmaceuticals is global, substantially altering crucial behaviours in animals and impacting on their reproduction and survival. A key question is whether the consequences of these pollutants extend beyond mean behavioural changes, restraining differences in behaviour between individuals. In a controlled, two-year, m...
Article
Full-text available
Worldwide, biologically active pharmaceuticals, such as psychoactive drugs, are routinely detected in aquatic ecosystems. In this regard, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a class of antidepressant, are of major environmental concern. Through targeted action on evolutionarily conserved physiological pathways, SSRIs could alter ecolog...
Article
Environmental pollution is an increasing problem for wildlife globally. Animals are confronted with many different forms of pollution, including chemicals, light, noise, and heat, and these can disrupt critical biological processes such as reproduction. Impacts on reproductive processes can dramatically reduce the number and quality of offspring pr...
Article
Pharmaceutical contaminants are being detected with increased frequency in organisms and ecosystems worldwide. This represents a major environmental concern given that various pharmaceuticals act on drug targets that are evolutionarily conserved across diverse taxa, are often persistent in the environment, and can bioconcentrate in organisms and bi...
Article
Hormonal growth promoters (HGPs), widely used in beef cattle production globally, make their way into the environment as agricultural effluent—with potential impacts on aquatic ecosystems. One HPG of particular concern is 17β-trenbolone, which is persistent in freshwater habitats and can affect the development, morphology and reproductive behaviors...
Article
The capacity of pharmaceutical pollution to alter behaviour in wildlife is of increasing environmental concern. A major pathway of these pollutants into the environment is the treatment of livestock with hormonal growth promotants (HGPs), which are highly potent veterinary pharmaceuticals that enter aquatic ecosystems via effluent runoff. Hormonal...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This project aims to investigate environmental impacts of the veterinary pharmaceutical metabolite 17β-trenbolone. We are interested in testing the impacts of exposure to 17β-trenbolone—an anabolic growth promoter used in beef cattle production worldwide, and a potent endocrine disruptor that has been repeatedly detected in surface waters affected by cattle effluent run-off—on behaviour and reproduction in non-target species. We are particularly interested in the potential of 17β-trenbolone to alter traits and behaviours with direct ecological and evolutionary significance, such as processes of pre- and post-copulatory sexual selection (e.g., mate choice, sperm performance), activity and exploration, sociability, feeding and foraging.
Project
Here we will investigate the impacts of environmentally realistic fluoxetine exposure on behaviour and reproduction of fish using both short-term and multigenerational exposures.