Jaime Schultz

Jaime Schultz
Pennsylvania State University | Penn State · Department of Kinesiology

About

32
Publications
8,699
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482
Citations
Citations since 2016
9 Research Items
323 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
This article is a critical celebration of Title IX. Fifty years of this landmark civil rights legislation has brought tremendous progress for girls and women in all areas of the U.S. educational system—including sport. However, Title IX has yet to achieve its full potential. For this to happen, I propose nine pressing issues that must be addressed:...
Article
Full-text available
Since the 1981 publication of Perspectives on the Academic Discipline of Physical Education, the history of physical activity has secured a prominent place in the field of kinesiology. Yet, despite encouraging signs of growth, the subdiscipline still remains an undervalued player in the “team scholarship” approach. Without the integration of histor...
Article
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Active in the Boston area from 1968 to 1974, members of the radical feminist organization Cell 16 advocated for a number of important causes, including martial arts training for women. In sparking the era’s feminist self-defence movement, they argued that learning to fight was ‘an absolutely necessary step in eradicating male supremacy and dominanc...
Article
Full-text available
Since the 1930s, sports administrators have insisted on various mechanisms to assess ‘femaleness’ for the purpose of competition in women’s sport. Most recently, the criterion has turned to testosterone. Specifically, if a woman naturally produces testosterone that registers in what sport authorities consider an ‘unnatural’ range, she must suppress...
Article
Full-text available
Research about “black” bones generated within the fields of craniometry, forensic anthropology, and sport science affects ideas about the suitability of “black” bodies for collision and aquatic sports. The belief that people of African descent have thicker, denser bones presupposes an attribute that allegedly guards against fracture but impedes buo...
Article
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Debuting in 2013, Esquire Network’s first season of White Collar Brawlers features professional-class men with workplace conflicts looking to “settle the score in the ring.” In the show, white-collar men are portrayed as using boxing to reclaim ostensibly primal aspects of masculinity, which their professional lives do not provide, making them appe...
Article
This article draws on Mills’ sociological imagination (from the 1959 publication The Sociological Imagination) to consider the connections between personal trouble and social issues when it comes to the causes and consequences of obesity. These connections may be important for assuaging the “obesity bias” that pervades our discipline, particularly...
Article
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The 1984 Los Angeles Games hosted, for the first time in Olympic history, a women's marathon race. It took the efforts of several important factions to accomplish the event. First, women runners demonstrated that they were capable of running great distances in increasingly faster times. Second, the popular media publicised those performances, often...
Article
Based on a true story, Glory Road recounts the story of the 1966 national championship Texas Western College basketball team and coach Don Haskins' decision to start, for the first time in tournament history, five black players. Contextualized by sociologist Patricia Hill Collins' concept of “new racism,” this article argues that filmmakers manipul...
Article
American entrepreneurs have, for more than a century, sought to cultivate female consumers of national pastimes, specifically horse racing, boxing, baseball, football and basketball. Because these sports have been principally and historically associated with manliness and masculinity, it is more appropriate to think in terms of women's involvement...
Article
Several sports have served as American national pastimes over the course of the nation's history. Horse racing, hunting, prize fighting, baseball, football, and basketball have waxed and waned in a long series of debates over what constitutes ‘true' national pastimes. Unlike some nations that have declared national pastimes by governmental fiat, US...
Book
This perceptive, lively study explores U.S. women's sport through historical “points of change”: particular products or trends that dramatically influenced both women's participation in sport and cultural responses to women athletes. Beginning with the seemingly innocent ponytail, the subject of the Introduction, the book challenges the reader to l...
Article
Full-text available
: This article analyzes three new-millennial historical sports films that deal with racial desegregation and integration in the United States: Remember the Titans (2000), Glory Road (2006), and The Express (2008). Specifically, it attends to the ways in which filmmakers play fast and loose with history when it comes to chronology, characters, and...
Article
This perceptive, lively study explores U.S. women’s sport through historical “points of change”: particular products or trends that dramatically influenced both women’s participation in sport and cultural responses to women athletes.Beginning with the seemingly innocent ponytail, the subject of the Introduction, scholar Jaime Schultz challenges the...
Article
In 2009, South African athletics star Caster Semenya won the 800-metre women's title at the track and field World Championships in Berlin. Shortly before the final heat of that event, the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) confirmed reports that she had been subjected to a process of ‘gender verification’. This essay examines...
Chapter
In August 2009, South African middle distance runner Caster Semenya, then just 18 years old, crushed the competition in her international debut. Beating her closest competitor by more than two seconds, Semenya took the 800 m title at the Track and Field World Championships in Berlin. But her stunning performance was both tarnished and overshadowed...
Article
Located at the heart of what was once the capital of the Confederate States of America, Monument Avenue is ‘Virginia's place to be recognized by Virginians’. For over a century the Richmond street's commemorative art paid homage to those labelled ‘heroes’ of the Confederacy, normalising and sanctioning a white, masculine, martial dominance that bec...
Article
Full-text available
In 2009, the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) forced Caster Semenya, the women's 800-meter champion from South Africa, to submit to “gender verification tests.” It took eleven months for officials to review the results of those tests and, ultimately, permit her compete again. Sports organizations, including the IAAF and the...
Chapter
Even the most cursory glance at the accolades awarded to Billie Jean King over the years demonstrates that this is a woman who deserves a prominent place in the pantheon of sporting greats. In a tennis career spanning four decades, she amassed 39 Grand Slam titles, including 20 Wimbledon and 13 US Open crowns. Yet, her legacy transcends the sports...
Article
In the first decades of the twentieth century, American women held swimming competitions, scaled mountains, piloted aeroplanes and staged large-scale parades in their quest for the right to vote. In effect, they spectacularized suffrage by positioning their bodies in the public sphere rather than confining their mission to the parlours and meeting-...
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This article focuses on historical memory as conditioned by changing attitudes toward race. The death of an African American football player was long ignored, but it served to ignite new discussion at Iowa State University as part of the changing racial climate of the civil rights era. The results exposed interesting divisions and generated intrigu...
Article
Within this essay we address sport film as particularly lustrous, affective and sensuous mediums onto which various socio-political trajectories become mapped and within which popular forms of culture are appropriated. Focusing on the 2004 Disney release of Miracle, we propose that the film is an emplotment of the past – a sanitized reconfiguration...
Article
This paper considers the politics involved in naming Iowa State University's football stadium after Jack Trice, the school's first African American athlete and its only athlete to die from injuries sustained in competition. This decision took place in the mid- to late-1990s, at nearly the same time administrators dedicated another site of memory on...
Article
Full-text available
During the 2002 U.S. Open, Serena Williams received a great deal of attention for wearing an outfit described as ”a body-clinging, faux leather, black cat-suit.” It was not necessarily the catsuit itself that the popular media found especially controversial but rather the visibility of her physique the outfit provided. The ways in which Serena Will...
Article
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The invention of the commercial sports bra in 1977 was a significant advancement for physically active women. Despite its humble origins as an enabling technology, the sports bra has since been invested with new and varied cultural meanings and currencies. In this article I critically read popular representations of sports bras, specifically advert...
Article
Full-text available
Ground reaction forces (GRF) are associated with bone hypertrophy; therefore, they are important to understanding physical activity's role in children's bone health. In this study, we examined the ability of accelerometry to predict vertical GRF in 40 children (mean age 8.6 yr) during slow walking, brisk walking, running, and jumping. Correlation c...

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