Jaime Guerra

Jaime Guerra
Universidad San Francisco de Quito (USFQ) · Department of Biology

Prof. Dr.

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15
Publications
10,183
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326
Citations
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February 1998 - October 2006
Universidad San Francisco de Quito (USFQ)
Position
  • Manager

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
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Ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) are common in lowland forests of Amazonia. We used camera traps to document the occurrence and activity of ocelots at a site in eastern Ecuador during 2005–2012 (15,058 trap-days). We accumulated 384 independent images of 16 males (147 images), 19 females (234 images), and 3 not assigned to individual or sex. Individual...
Article
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Despite widespread recent perceptions, the collection of research specimens remains vital to the advance of modern science. Around the world, increasing popular awareness of extinctions has resulted in policies and regulations that run counter to this necessity. Among the scientific community as well as the lay citizens of the planet, confusion abo...
Article
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Jaguars (Panthera onca) are the largest predator in lowland forests of Amazonia but there have been few studies on their occurrence and activity in such forests. Here, we used camera traps to document the occur-rence and activity of jaguars within a local area (~650ha) of lowland forest of Eastern Ecuador, over two sample periods (2005-2008, 7 222...
Article
Full-text available
Jaguars (Panthera onca) are the largest predator in lowland forests of Amazonia but there have been few studies on their occurrence and activity in such forests. Here, we used camera traps to document the occurrence and activity of jaguars within a local area (~650ha) of lowland forest of Eastern Ecuador, over two sample periods (2005-2008, 7 222 t...
Article
Full-text available
El murciélago orejudo peludo, Micronycteris hirsuta, ha sido observado en el ático de un edificio con aperturas alrededor del techo. Su comportamiento estereotípico incluye el regreso al sitio de descanso con las presas antes de consumirlas. Al llegar, las alas y otras partes duras son descartadas. Como estas partes se acumulan debajo de ellos, es...
Article
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La rata endémica Aegiolomys galapagoensis bauri de la Isla Santa Fe en el centro del Archipiélago de Galápagos fue observada consumiendo la placenta de un lobo marino (Zalophus wollebacki). Para un mamífero pequeño que consume principalmente materia vegetal, la posibilidad de aprovechar una fuente de proteínas concentradas debe ser una oportunidad...
Article
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Daily activity patterns of most Neotropical mammals are not well described although general patterns (nocturnal, diurnal) are known. yet general categories often do not reflect variation in activity over time or among different habitats or regions. We used camera traps to learn more about how daily activity patterns of mammals vary at a site in low...
Chapter
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A review of the distribution of Amorphochilus schnablii in Ecuador is presented with commentary about new records that extend the species range farther to the north.
Article
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Hairy Big-eared Bats, Micronycteris hirsuta, have been observed to occupy attics in buildings that are not well sealed. Stereotypically, prey is brought to the roosting site for consumption where wings and hard structures are discarded while soft body parts are ingested. This behavior has allowed our evaluation of their diet. At the Bosque Protecto...
Article
Full-text available
The endemic rice rat Aegiolomys galapagoensis bauri on the island of Santa Fe in the central part of the Galapagos Archipelago has been observed to consume the placenta of the Galapagos Sea lion (Zalophus wollebacki). This diurnal scavenging undoubtedly represents a means of obtaining proteins for a small mammal that typically specializes on a diet...
Article
Full-text available
Mineral licks are sites where a diverse array of mammals and birds consume soil (geophagy) or drink water, likely for mineral supplementation. The diversity of species that visit such sites makes them important for conservation, particularly given that hunters often target animals at licks. Use of mineral licks varies among species, with frugivores...
Article
Full-text available
To add to the sparse know-ledge of this species, we report the first photographic records of E. saturnus, from lowland forest in eastern Ecuador. STUDY AREA AND METHODS We conducted our research at Tiputini Biodiversity Station (TBS), Orellana Province, Ecuador (c. 0°37'S, 76°10'W, 190-270 m elevation). TBS was founded in 1994 by the Universidad Sa...
Article
Full-text available
Geophagy occurs in all primate groups and is particularly common in species that consume greater quantities of plant material, i.e., leaves, fruit. The function of geophagy is not fully understood and likely varies over space and time, perhaps in connection with changes in diet. Central to a better understanding of geophagy in primate ecology is kn...

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