Jaime J Castrellon

Jaime J Castrellon
University of Pennsylvania | UP · Department of Psychology

Ph.D.

About

32
Publications
7,137
Reads
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917
Citations
Citations since 2017
31 Research Items
915 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
Additional affiliations
August 2017 - June 2022
Duke University
Position
  • Graduate Student
November 2016 - July 2017
University of California, Los Angeles
Position
  • Laboratory Manager
May 2014 - November 2016
Vanderbilt University
Position
  • Research Analyst
Education
August 2010 - December 2013
University of Southern California
Field of study
  • Neuroscience

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
Full-text available
Some people are more willing to make immediate, risky, or costly reward-focused choices than others, which has been hypothesized to be associated with individual differences in dopamine (DA) function. In two studies using PET imaging, one empirical (Study 1: N = 144 males and females across 3 samples) and one meta-analytic (Study 2: N = 307 across...
Preprint
Developmental literature suggests that susceptibility to social conformity pressure peaks in adolescence and disappears with maturity into early adulthood. Predictions about these behaviors are less clear in older adults. On the one hand, while prioritization of socioemotional goals among older adults might predict greater susceptibility to social...
Article
Full-text available
Jury decisions are among the most consequential social decisions in which bias plays a notable role. While courts take measures to reduce the influence of non-evidentiary factors, jurors may still incorporate biases into their decisions. One common bias, crime-type bias, is the extent to which the perceived strength of a prosecutor's case depends o...
Article
Efforts to explain complex human decisions have focused on competing theories emphasizing utility and narrative mechanisms. These are difficult to distinguish using behavior alone. Both narrative and utility theories have been proposed to explain juror decisions, which are among the most consequential complex decisions made in a modern society. Her...
Preprint
Full-text available
Using a neurometric approach, we identify and validate a neural signature of reward encoded in a distributed pattern of brain activity using data collected from 21 different studies (N = 2,691). Our model can discriminate between receiving rewards from punishments in completely independent data with 99% accuracy and includes weights located in regi...
Preprint
Full-text available
People regularly give in to daily temptations in spite of conflict with personal goals. To test hypotheses about neuropharmacological influences on self-control, we used positron emission tomography to measure dopamine D2-like receptors (D2R) and experience sampling surveys to naturalistically track daily desires outside the laboratory in everyday...
Preprint
Jury decisions are among the most consequential social decisions in which bias plays a notable role. While courts take a number of measures to reduce the influence of bias on decisions about case strength or deserved punishment based on evidence introduced during a trial, jurors may still incorporate personal biases based on knowledge, experience,...
Article
Full-text available
Rationale Although numerous studies have suggested that pharmacological alteration of the dopamine (DA) system modulates reward discounting, these studies have produced inconsistent findings. Objectives Here, we conducted a systematic review and pre-registered meta-analysis to evaluate DA drug-mediated effects on reward discounting of time, probab...
Preprint
Full-text available
Efforts to explain complex human decisions have focused on competing theories emphasizing utility and narrative mechanisms. These are difficult to distinguish using behavior alone. Both narrative and utility theories have been proposed to explain juror decisions, which are among the most consequential complex decisions made in a modern society. Her...
Article
Full-text available
Data analysis workflows in many scientific domains have become increasingly complex and flexible. Here we assess the effect of this flexibility on the results of functional magnetic resonance imaging by asking 70 independent teams to analyse the same dataset, testing the same 9 ex-ante hypotheses1. The flexibility of analytical approaches is exempl...
Preprint
Full-text available
Although numerous studies have suggested that pharmacological alteration of the dopamine (DA) system modulates reward discounting, these studies have produced inconsistent findings. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate DA drug-mediated effects on reward discounting in studies of healthy rodents. This produced a total...
Article
Full-text available
Older adults report experiencing improved emotional health, such as more intense positive affect and less intense negative affect. However, there are mixed findings on whether older adults are better at regulating emotion-a hallmark feature of emotional health-and most research is based on laboratory studies that may not capture how people regulate...
Article
Full-text available
The process by which the value of delayed rewards is discounted varies from person to person. It has been suggested that these individual differences in subjective valuation of delayed rewards are supported by mesolimbic dopamine D2-like receptors (D2Rs) in the ventral striatum. However, no study to date has documented an association between direct...
Preprint
Full-text available
Data analysis workflows in many scientific domains have become increasingly complex and flexible. To assess the impact of this flexibility on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) results, the same dataset was independently analyzed by 70 teams, testing nine ex-ante hypotheses. The flexibility of analytic approaches is exemplified by the fac...
Article
The evidence that dopamine function mediates the association between aging and cognition is one of the most cited findings in the cognitive neuroscience of aging. However, few and relatively small studies have directly examined these associations. Here we examined correlations among adult age, dopamine D2-like receptor (D2R) availability, and cogni...
Preprint
Full-text available
The process by which the value of delayed rewards is discounted varies from person to person. It has been suggested that these individual differences in subjective valuation of delayed rewards are supported by mesolimbic dopamine D2-like receptors (D2Rs) in the ventral striatum. However, no study to date has documented an association between direct...
Preprint
Full-text available
Older adults report experiencing improved emotional health, such as higher levels of positive affect and lower levels of negative affect. However, there are mixed findings on whether older adults are better at regulating emotion—a hallmark feature of emotional health—and most research is based on laboratory studies that may not capture how people r...
Article
Full-text available
Theories of adult brain development, based on neuropsychological test results and structural neuroimaging, suggest differential rates of age‐related change in function across cortical and subcortical sub‐regions. However, it remains unclear if these trends also extend to the aging dopamine system. Here we examined cross‐sectional adult age differen...
Preprint
Full-text available
The evidence that dopamine function mediates the association between aging and cognition is one of the most widely cited findings in the cognitive neuroscience of aging. However, relatively few and relatively small studies have directly examined these associations. Here we examined correlations among adult age, dopamine D2-like receptor (D2R) avail...
Preprint
Full-text available
Some people are more willing to make immediate, risky, or costly reward-focused choices than others, which has been hypothesized to be associated with individual differences in dopamine (DA) function. In two studies using PET imaging, one empirical (Study 1: N=144 males and females across 3 samples) and one meta-analytic (Study 2: N=307 across 12 s...
Preprint
Full-text available
Theories of adult brain development, based on neuropsychological test results and structural neuroimaging, suggest differential rates of age-related change in function across cortical and subcortical sub-regions. However, it remains unclear if these trends also extend to the aging dopamine system. Here we examined cross-sectional adult age differen...
Article
Reward valuation, which underlies all value-based decision-making, has been associated with dopamine function in many studies of nonhuman animals, but there is relatively less direct evidence for an association in humans. Here, we measured dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) availability in vivo in humans to examine relations between individual differences...
Article
Full-text available
Every day, humans make countless decisions which require the integration of information about potential benefits (i.e., rewards) with other decision features (i.e., effort required, probability of an outcome, or time delays). Here we examine the overlap and dissociation of behavioral preferences and neural representations of subjective value in the...
Article
The fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO) was the first gene identified by genome-wide association studies to correlate with higher body mass index (BMI) and increased odds of obesity. FTO remains the locus with the largest and most replicated effect on body weight, but the mechanism whereby FTO affects body weight and the development of obesi...
Article
Full-text available
Spontaneous eye blink rate (EBR) has been proposed as a noninvasive, inexpensive marker of dopamine functioning. Support for a relation between EBR and dopamine function comes from observations that EBR is altered in populations with dopamine dysfunction and EBR changes under a dopaminergic manipulation. However, the evidence across the literature...
Article
Full-text available
Although a group of people working together recalls more items than any one individual, they recall fewer unique items than the same number of people working apart whose responses are combined. This is known as collaborative inhibition, and it is a robust effect that occurs for both younger and older adults. However, almost all previous studies doc...
Article
Full-text available
Physical activity has been shown to ameliorate dopaminergic degeneration in non-human animal models. However, the effects of regular physical activity on normal age-related changes in dopamine function in humans are unknown. Here we present cross-sectional data from forty-four healthy human subjects between 23 and 80 years old, showing that typical...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: The dopamine D2/3 receptor subtypes (DRD2/3) are the most widely studied neurotransmitter biomarker in research on obesity, but results to date have been inconsistent, have typically involved small samples, and have rarely accounted for subjects' ages despite the large impact of age on DRD2/3 levels. We aimed to clarify the relation bet...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
- examine relations between dopamine D2 receptors and whole brain functional connectivity - examine the role of age in dopamine-related whole brain functional connectivity