Jacques Grinevald

Jacques Grinevald
Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies · Centre for Finance and Development

Doctorat 3e Cycle de philosophie (épistémologie et histoire des sciences)

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48
Publications
64,225
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5,091
Citations
Citations since 2017
9 Research Items
4063 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230200400600800
20172018201920202021202220230200400600800

Publications

Publications (48)
Chapter
Stratigraphy provides insights into the evolution and dynamics of the Earth System over its long history. With recent developments in Earth System science, changes in Earth System dynamics can now be observed directly and projected into the near future. An integration of the two approaches provides powerful insights into the nature and significance...
Chapter
Q. Edward Wang’s unparalleled four-volume survey of historiography examines the nature and significance of history writing from ancient worlds to the present day. Taking a global approach, it presents and contextualizes classic works that portray the traditions of historical writing around the world. The collection also incorporates key essays and...
Article
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We analyse the ‘three flaws’ to potentially defining a formal Anthropocene geological time unit as advanced by Ruddiman (2018). (1) We recognize a long record of pre-industrial human impacts, but note that these increased in relative magnitude slowly and were strongly time-transgressive by comparison with the extraordinarily rapid, novel and near-g...
Article
We analyse the ‘three flaws’ to potentially defining a formal Anthropocene geological time unit as advanced by Ruddiman (2018). (1) We recognize a long record of pre-industrial human impacts, but note that these increased in relative magnitude slowly and were strongly time-transgressive by comparison with the extraordinarily rapid, novel and near-g...
Book
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The Anthropocene, a term launched into public debate by Nobel Prize winner Paul Crutzen, has been used informally to describe the time period during which human actions have had a drastic effect on the Earth and its ecosystems. This book presents evidence for defining the Anthropocene as a geological epoch, written by the high-profile international...
Data
This is the link to the press release from University of Leicester for the new AWG paper authored by the above members of the working group: https://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/press/press-releases/2017/march/the-anthropocene-scientists-respond-to-criticisms-of-a-new-geological-epoch
Article
Full-text available
A range of published arguments against formalizing the Anthropocene as a geological time unit have variously suggested that it is a misleading term of non-stratigraphic origin and usage, is based on insignificant temporal and material stratigraphic content unlike that used to define older geological time units, is focused on observation of human hi...
Chapter
This article deals with the study of the link between Pierre Teilhard de Chardin and Vladimir Vernadsky’s notions of biosphere. Both authors make every effort to completely rebuild the unity between mankind and Universe that has been destroyed over the last centuries. In doing so, those two summarize Alexandre Humboldt’s ideas about biogeography as...
Chapter
Vladimir I. Vernadsky (1863-1945), the founder of biogeochemistry and immortal author of Biosfera, in 1926, has yet never aroused, on the international level, such impressive manifestations as Charles Darwin. Awared of the revolutionary character of his scientific work on living matter and its biogeochemical and geological role within “the living o...
Article
Full-text available
We assess the scale and extent of the physical technosphere, defined here as the summed material output of the contemporary human enterprise. It includes active urban, agricultural and marine components, used to sustain energy and material flow for current human life, and a growing residue layer, currently only in small part recycled back into the...
Article
Full-text available
Stratigraphy provides insights into the evolution and dynamics of the Earth System over its long history. With recent developments in Earth System science, changes in Earth System dynamics can now be observed directly and projected into the near future. An integration of the two approaches provides powerful insights into the nature and significance...
Article
Full-text available
Human activity is leaving a pervasive and persistent signature on Earth. Vigorous debate continues about whether this warrants recognition as a new geologic time unit known as the Anthropocene. We review anthropogenic markers of functional changes in the Earth system through the stratigraphic record. The appearance of manufactured materials in sedi...
Article
Full-text available
A recently published analysis by Lewis and Maslin (Lewis SL and Maslin MA (2015) Defining the Anthropocene. Nature 519: 171–180) has identified two new potential horizons for the Holocene−Anthropocene boundary: 1610 (associated with European colonization of the Americas), or 1964 (the peak of the excess radiocarbon signal arising from atom bomb tes...
Article
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Many scientists are making the case that humanity is living in a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, but there is no agreement yet as to when this epoch began. The start might be defined by a historical event, such as the beginning of the fossil-fueled Industrial Revolution or the first nuclear explosion in 1945. Standard stratigraphic practice...
Article
Full-text available
As members of the Anthropocene Working Group, we contend that the proposed new geological epoch should reflect a unique stratigraphic unit that is characterized by unambiguous, widespread and essentially permanent anthropogenic signatures in rock, glacial ice or marine sediments. We therefore find the two dates chosen by Simon Lewis and Mark Maslin...
Article
Full-text available
Various authors have identified ‘precursors’ of the new concept of the Anthropocene, with most frequent reference made to Antonio Stoppani, Vladimir Vernadsky and Pierre Teilhard de Chardin. The effect, intended or otherwise, of finding forerunners is to deflate the significance of the proposed new geological epoch. We argue there were no precursor...
Article
Full-text available
We evaluate the boundary of the Anthropocene geological time interval as an epoch, since it is useful to have a consistent temporal definition for this increasingly used unit, whether the presently informal term is eventually formalized or not. Of the three main levels suggested e an ‘early Anthropocene’ level some thousands of years ago; the begin...
Chapter
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This chapter introduces the thematic dossier of International Development Policy on the intimate relationship between energy and development. The authors discuss the centrality of fossil fuels in the economic growth of the Western world since the nineteenth century and the key role of oil in the twentieth century and question the future of this dev...
Chapter
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Cet article introduit le dossier thématique consacré à la relation intime entre énergie et développement. Les auteurs retracent l’importance des énergies fossiles dans la croissance économique du monde occidental dès le XIXe siècle et le rôle central du pétrole au XXe siècle pour s’interroger sur les limites de ce modèle de développement face aux c...
Article
Full-text available
The human imprint on the global environment has now become so large and active that it rivals some of the great forces of Nature in its impact on the functioning of the Earth system. Although global-scale human influence on the environment has been recognized since the 1800s, the term Anthropocene, introduced about a decade ago, has only recently b...
Article
Conference on Gaia: Theory, Practice, and Implications, held at Worthyvale Manor, Camelford, Cornwall, England, UK, 21–24 October 1987 - Volume 15 Issue 1 - Jacques Grinevald

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The Anthropocene concept is a multileveled approach, based on 1) anthropogenic changes in the Earth system level; 2) its imprint and manifestation in geological sediments, possibly demanding the establishment of a new geological epoch (geology level); and 3) the responsibility metalevel where, based on the outcomes of 1 and 2 societal, technical and cultural matters are discussed and negotiated what to do with the research results from 1) and 2) and which pathways exist into a "functioning" future Earth system which supports humans and nature on a long-scale. Although all three levels are interconnected, discussion and criticism on the Anthropocene concept should explicitly address the relevant level(s).
Project
The Anthropocene concept is a multileveled approach, based on 1) anthropogenic changes in the Earth System level; 2) its imprint and manifestation in geological sediments, possibly demanding the establishment of a new geological epoch (geology level); and 3) the responsibility metalevel where, based on the outcomes of 1 and 2 societal, technical and cultural matters are discussed and negotiated what to do with the research results from 1) and 2) and which pathways exist into a "functioning" future Earth system which supports humans and nature on a long-scale. Although all three levels are interconnected, discussion and criticism on the Anthropocene concept should explicitly address the relevant level(s).