Jacqueline L Padilla-Gamiño

Jacqueline L Padilla-Gamiño
University of Washington Seattle | UW · School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences

Ph.D. Oceanography

About

54
Publications
18,102
Reads
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1,494
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - present
University of Washington
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2014 - August 2016
California State University, Dominguez Hills
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
September 2011 - December 2013
University of California, Santa Barbara
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (54)
Article
Full-text available
Marine pathogens present serious challenges to aquaculture, fisheries productivity, and marine conservation requiring novel solutions to identify, control, and mitigate their effects. Several ecological habitats, such as mangroves and wetlands can recycle waste and serve as aquatic filtration systems. While nutrient cycling and other ecosystem serv...
Article
Full-text available
Coral bleaching events are increasing with such frequency and intensity that many of the world’s reef-building corals are in peril. Some corals appear to be more resilient after bleaching but the mechanisms underlying their ability to recover from bleaching and persist are not fully understood. We used shotgun proteomics to compare the proteomes of...
Article
Full-text available
Assessing the vulnerability of marine invertebrates to ocean acidification (OA) requires an understanding of critical thresholds at which developmental, physiological, and behavioral traits are affected. To identify relevant thresholds for echinoderms, we undertook a three-step data synthesis, focused on California Current Ecosystem (CCE) species....
Article
Full-text available
Coral diseases have increased in frequency and intensity around the tropics worldwide. However, in many cases, little is known about their etiology. Montipora white syndrome (MWS) is a common disease affecting the coral Montipora capitata, a major reef builder in Hawai’i. Chronic Montipora white syndrome (cMWS) is a slow‐moving form of the disease...
Article
Full-text available
Global climate change is causing ocean acidification (OA), warming, and decreased dissolved oxygen (DO) in coastal areas, which can cause physiological stress and compromise the health of marine organisms. While there is increased focus on how these stressors will affect marine species, there is little known regarding how changes in water chemistry...
Preprint
Full-text available
The microbiomes of tropical reef-building corals are actively studied using 16S rRNA gene amplicons to understand microbial roles in coral health, metabolism, and disease resistance. However, primers targeting bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes may additionally amplify organelle rRNA genes from the coral, associated microbial eukaryotes, and enc...
Article
Full-text available
Coral bleaching is the single largest global threat to coral reefs worldwide. Integrating the diverse body of work on coral bleaching is critical to understanding and combating this global problem. Yet investigating the drivers, patterns, and processes of coral bleaching poses a major challenge. A recent review of published experiments revealed a w...
Article
Full-text available
Recent warnings from scientists suggest there is limited time to enact policies to avert wide‐ranging ecological and social damage from climate change. In the United States, discussions about comprehensive national policies to avert climate change have begun, with “Green New Deal” proposals and climate plans put forth by members of Congress and pre...
Article
Full-text available
Invasions by shell-boring polychaetes such as Polydora websteri Hartman have resulted in the collapse of oyster aquaculture industries in Australia, New Zealand, and Hawaii. These worms burrow into bivalve shells, creating unsightly mud blisters that are unappealing to consumers and, when nicked during shucking, release mud and detritus that can fo...
Article
Plastic pollution is a threat to marine life with long term impacts to ecosystems and organisms in the sea. In this study, we quantified the presence of microparticles in wild populations of Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) from the Salish Sea, Washington State. Examination under a dissecting microscope revealed 63% of oysters contained micropar...
Article
Full-text available
Rising sea temperatures and increasing pollution threaten the fate of coral reefs and millions of people who depend on them. Some reef-building corals respond to thermal stress and subsequent bleaching with increases in heterotrophy, which may increase the risk of ingesting microplastics. Whether this heterotrophic plasticity affects microplastics...
Preprint
Full-text available
Invasions by the spionid polychaete Polydora websteri have resulted in the collapse of oyster aquaculture industries in Australia, New Zealand, and Hawaii. These worms burrow into the shells of bivalves, creating unsightly mud blisters that are unappealing to consumers and, when nicked during shucking, release mud and detritus that can foul oyster...
Preprint
Invasions by the spionid polychaete Polydora websteri have resulted in the collapse of oyster aquaculture industries in Australia, New Zealand, and Hawaii. These worms burrow into the shells of bivalves, creating unsightly mud blisters that are unappealing to consumers and, when nicked during shucking, release mud and detritus that can foul oyster...
Article
Despite widespread climate-driven r ductions of coral cover on tropical reefs, little attention has been paid to the possibility that changes in the geographic distribution of coral recruitment could facilitate beneficial responses to the changing climate through latitudinal range shifts. To address this possibility, we compiled a global database o...
Chapter
Full-text available
The Hawaiian Archipelago is one of the largest and most isolated island chains in the world, and its marine ecosystems are well-studied. Research on Hawaiian mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs) began in the 1960s and has intensified during the past decade. In Hawai‘i, rich communities of macroalgae, corals and other invertebrates, and fishes inhabit...
Article
Full-text available
Mesophotic reef corals remain largely unexplored in terms of the genetic adaptations and physiological mechanisms to acquire, allocate, and use energy for survival and reproduction. In the Hawaiian Archipelago, the Leptoseris species complex form the most spatially extensive mesophotic coral ecosystem known and provide habitat for a unique communit...
Preprint
Full-text available
Invasions by the spionid polychaete Polydora websteri have resulted in the collapse of oyster aquaculture industries in Australia, New Zealand, and Hawaii. These worms burrow into the shells of bivalves, creating unsightly mud blisters that are unappealing to consumers and, when nicked during shucking, release mud and detritus that can foul oyster...
Article
Full-text available
To project how ocean acidification will impact biological communities in the future, it is critical to understand the potential for local adaptation and the physiological plasticity of marine organisms throughout their entire life cycle, as some stages may be more vulnerable than others. Coralline algae are ecosystem engineers that play significant...
Article
Full-text available
Many studies have reported reductions in body size and calcification rates for marine larvae exposed to ocean acidification conditions. However, the physiological mechanisms driving these effects, and mechanisms underlying body size variation in general, are poorly understood. Here, we combine transcriptome sequencing with bulked segregant analysis...
Article
Full-text available
Despite being one of the simplest metazoans, corals harbor some of the most highly diverse and abundant microbial communities. Differentiating core, symbiotic bacteria from this diverse host-associated consortium is essential for characterizing the functional contributions of bacteria but has not been possible yet. Here we characterize the coral co...
Article
Full-text available
Studies have identified chemicals within the stony coral genus Montipora that have significant biological activities. For example, Montiporic acids A and B and other compounds have been isolated from the adult tissue and eggs of Montipora spp. and have displayed antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity in cultured cells. The ecological role of these...
Article
Full-text available
Reef-building corals inhabiting the mesophotic zone (30−150 m) not only survive but thrive in light-limiting environments. Similar to shallow corals, mesophotic corals also exhibit coral fluorescence. Because fluorescent proteins (FPs) absorb high-energy light and emit lower energy light, FPs could play an important role in mesophotic coral physiol...
Article
Full-text available
Corals at the lower limits of mesophotic habitats are likely to have unique photosynthetic adaptations that allow them to persist and dominate in these extreme low light ecosystems. We examined the host–symbiont relationships from the dominant coral genus Leptoseris in mesophotic environments from Hawai‘i collected by submersibles across a depth gr...
Data
Table S1: Detailed Summary Table. Detailed list of collection depths and dates, as well as sampling sites with latitude/longitude coordinates and the coral cover observed around each of the 74 Leptoseris spp. samples investigated in this study. Figure S1: Phylogenetic reconstruction of the coral genus Leptoseris. Best Maximum likelihood (ML) topolo...
Article
Full-text available
Compiled abundances of juvenile corals revealed no change over time in the Pacific, but a decline in the Caribbean. Using these analyses as a rationale, we explored recruitment and post-settlement success in determining coral cover using studies in the Caribbean (St John, Bonaire) and Pacific (Moorea, Okinawa). Juvenile corals, coral recruits, and...
Article
Full-text available
The California Current Large Marine Ecosystem (CCLME), a temperate marine region dominated by episodic upwelling, is predicted to experience rapid environmental change in the future due to ocean acidification. Aragonite saturation state within the California Current System is predicted to decrease in the future, with near-permanent undersaturation...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental conditions can influence the physiology of marine organisms and have important implications for their reproductive performance and capacity to supply new recruits. This study examined the seasonal reproductive patterns of the coral Montipora capitata in habitats exposed to different sedimentation regimes. Although M. capitata is a mai...
Article
Full-text available
The C-MORE Professional Development Training Program aims to equip graduate students and post-doctoral researchers with the skills and experiences needed to maximize their potential and succeed in their professional careers. The program has formal but flexible requirements, with participants choosing among modules such as outreach, science communic...
Article
A rapidly growing body of literature documents the potential negative effects of CO2 -driven ocean acidification (OA) on marine organisms. However, nearly all of this work has focused on the effects of future conditions on modern populations, neglecting the role of adaptation. Rapid evolution can alter demographic responses to environmental change,...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean warming and ocean acidification, both consequences of anthropogenic production of CO2, will combine to influence the physiological performance of many species in the marine environment. In this study, we used an integrative approach to forecast the impact of future ocean conditions on larval purple sea urchins (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus)...
Article
Full-text available
Parental effects have been largely unexplored in marine organisms and may play a significant role in dictating the phenotypic range of traits in coral offspring, influencing their ability to survive environmental challenges.This study explored parental effects and life-stage differences in the Hawaiian reef-building coral Montipora capitata from di...
Data
Ocean warming and ocean acidification, both consequences of anthropogenic production of CO2, will combine to influence the physiological performance of many species in the marine environment. In this study, we used an integrative approach to forecast the impact of future ocean conditions on larval purple sea urchins (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus)...
Article
Increasing terrestrial runoff due to anthropogenic activities has become a major problem for coral reef ecosystems around the world. Turbidity due to runoff can reduce light availability (via nutrient enrichment and sedimentation) and influence the biology and ecology of coral reefs. In this study, we explored the physiology and acclimatization pot...
Article
Full-text available
Parental effects are ubiquitous in nature and in many organisms play a particularly critical role in the transfer of symbionts across generations; however, their influence and relative importance in the marine environment has rarely been considered. Coral reefs are biologically diverse and productive marine ecosystems, whose success is framed by sy...
Data
Symbiodinium ITS2 secondary structures. Distinct structure folds representing the 29 ITS2 sequences shown in Fig. 1 (schematized here on the upper left corner). Seven distinct fold clusters (a-g) were characterized based on criteria described in [37]. The seven secondary folding structures shown here correspond to the most dominant ITS2 sequence fo...
Data
GenBank accession numbers for the Symbiodinium ITS2 sequences identified in the present study. (DOCX)
Data
Temperature (°C) and light (µmol quanta/m2s) data from the three study sites in Moku O Lo’e Island, Kaneohe Bay Hawai’i. (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
The release of gametes into the water column by broadcast-spawning marine invertebrates represents the culmination of several physiological events in the parents and the first step in the supply of new recruits to marine ecosystem. The input of new propagules to coral reefs relies on spawning events that display remarkable synchronicity during limi...
Article
Full-text available
The majority of scleractinian corals are hermaphrodites that broadcast spawn their gametes separately or packaged as egg–sperm bundles during spawning events that are timed to the lunar cycle. The egg–sperm bundle is an efficient way of transporting gametes to the ocean surface where fertilization takes place, while minimizing sperm dilution and ma...
Article
The earliest record of animals (Metazoa) consists of trace and body fossils restricted to the last 35 Myr of the Precambrian. It has been proposed that animals arose much earlier and underwent significant evolution as a cryptic fauna; however, the need for any unrecorded prelude of significant duration has been disputed. In this context, we conside...
Article
Laurencia is a globally distributed genus with about 80 species (order Ceramiales) that inhabit tropical, subtropical, and warm-temperate regions of both sides of the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific oceans. This study investigated how two species of Laurencia distributed in different thermal environments (California and Hawaii) varied in their photosynth...
Article
We studied the photosynthetic acclimatization of two populations of Asparagopsis taxiformis from two biogeographic regions (Santa Catalina Island, California, and Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii) in two seasons. We compared thermal variability between locations and estimated the environmental optima and tolerance limits of photosynthesis to understand the rela...

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Project (1)
Project
Coral reefs are one of the most diverse ecosystems on the planet, and they support more species per unit area than any other environment. Coral reefs protect coastlines, assist in carbon and nutrient cycling, provide important environmental services, and contribute billions of dollars to coastal economies around the world. Currently, coral reefs are facing unprecedented pressures due to climate change and other anthropogenic stressors such as poor water quality and over-exploitation of reef resources. In order to better protect these valuable ecosystems and project how they will be impacted in the future, it is critical that we understand coral’s physiological capacity, tolerance, and ability to reproduce and persist under variable conditions. What are its biological thresholds? How will future generations be compromised? How fast can adaptation occur in the coral host and its symbionts? How can we detect the most resilient coral genotypes? Can we make corals more resilient to climate change? What is the role of the microbiome, and how does it interact with the coral host under stress? These are fundamental questions that have important implications for the persistence of coral communities, reef resilience, and the effective management of marine ecosystems. With the aim of better understanding the factors that control the biology, physiology, and reproduction of corals, this Special Issue will bring together experts from different fields in order to share their new findings, syntheses, and reviews of how changes in the environment can affect coral’s performance and resilience at the population, organismal, and molecular levels. This information is essential for the management and protection of coral reefs, and to preserve many other ecologically and economically important species and resources from the tropical seas. Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818; CODEN: DIVEC6) is a peer-reviewed, open-access journal on the science of biodiversity from molecules, genes, populations, and species, to ecosystems.