Jacqueline Michel

Jacqueline Michel
Research Planning, Inc · Research Planning, Inc.

Ph.D. Geology

About

201
Publications
94,425
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3,991
Citations
Introduction
Education
August 1976 - May 1980
University of South Carolina
Field of study
  • Geology

Publications

Publications (201)
Article
Full-text available
Multiple studies have examined the effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on coastal marsh shoreline erosion. Most studies have concluded that the spill increased shoreline erosion (linear retreat) in oiled marshes by ~ 100-200% for at least 2-3 years. However, two studies have called much of this prior research into question, due to potential...
Article
Full-text available
Based on past spills, the conditions under which floating oil mixes with enough sand to form sunken oil mats (SOMs) are identified. SOMs form mostly during spills of heavy crudes or heavy fuel oils, but also highly weathered and viscous crude oils. They usually form when oil and sand are both suspended in the water column by breaking waves or by th...
Article
Full-text available
The Deepwater Horizon oil spill (2010) resulted in ~100 km of heavily oiled salt marsh shorelines with severe marsh vegetation impacts. Approximately 27 km of these shorelines had marsh cleanup treatments aimed at limiting oil spread and facilitating ecological recovery. Heavy oiling impacts and disturbance from intensive cleanup treatments left ma...
Article
Full-text available
Assessing environmental injury requires accurate, timely information of damage responses and realistic translation of that information into estimates of services lost to the public. The accuracy of both steps improves with the extent of ecological understanding of the impacted habitat; more accurate assessments produce more effective rehabilitation...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Spills that result in oiled marshes provide unique challenges for responders because intensive removal methods can cause additional harm and slow overall recovery of the habitat. These issues are of particular concern for spills that affect the marsh interior, where access is limited, often resulting in extensive damage from foot and vessel traffic...
Article
Full-text available
Spills that result in oiled marshes provide unique challenges for responders because intensive removal methods can cause additional harm and slow overall recovery of the habitat. These issues are of particular concern for spills that affect the marsh interior, where access is limited, often resulting in extensive damage from foot and vessel traffic...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Version 4 of the NOAA Guidelines for producing Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data and maps
Technical Report
Full-text available
The objectives of this guide are to outline the basic elements of a sensitivity mapping system and provide guidance on what and how various components are mapped.
Article
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Remaining lingering subsurface oil residues from the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS) are, at present, patchily distributed across the geologically complex and spatially extensive shorelines of Prince William Sound and the Gulf of Alaska. We review and synthesize previous literature describing the causal geomorphic and physical mechanisms for persiste...
Article
Full-text available
Immediately following the unprecedented use of dispersants in response to the Deepwater Horizon (a.k.a. MC252) incident, the National Response Team (NRT) issued a memorandum to NRT members and Regional Response Team (RRT) co-chairs recommending review and revision of all dispersant preauthorization plans. During this review process, the Regional Re...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The broad adoption of remotely sensed data and derivative products from satellite and aerial platforms available to describe the distribution of spilled oil on the water surface was an important factor during the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill both for tactical response and damage assessment. The availability and utility of these data in describ...
Article
Full-text available
2017-054 The 2016 American Petroleum Institute inland guide incorporates lessons learned from spill responses that can minimize the environmental impacts of inland oil spills. In addition, it provides new information on the changing risk profiles of inland spills in North America. such as the increase in oil transportation by rail, the added risks...
Chapter
When spilled oil does not float, responders are faced with special challenges. Case studies of 31 past spills where the oil either sank or become submerged in the water column were reviewed to identify the oil properties and spill conditions that are most likely to cause oil to sink or submerge. Oils that are heavier than the receiving water will s...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Immediately following the unprecedented use of dispersants in response to the Deepwater Horizon (a.k.a. MC252) incident, the National Response Team (NRT) issued a memorandum to NRT members and Regional Response Team (RRT) co-chairs recommending review and revision of all dispersant preauthorization plans. During this review process, the Regional Re...
Article
Sand beaches are highly dynamic habitats that can experience considerable impacts from oil spills. This review provides a synthesis of the scientific literature on major oil spills and their impacts on sand beaches, with emphasis on studies documenting effects and recoveries of intertidal invertebrate communities. One of the key observations arisin...
Article
Full-text available
We build on previous work to construct a comprehensive database of shoreline oiling exposure from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill by compiling field and remotely-sensed datasets to support oil exposure and injury quantification. We compiled a spatial database of shoreline segments with attributes summarizing habitat, oiling category and timeline....
Article
Full-text available
Studies of oil spills on sand beaches have focused traditionally on the effects of short-term oil exposure, with recovery of sand beach macrobenthic communities occurring within several weeks to several years. The Deepwater Horizon spill resulted in chronic, multi-year re-oiling and up to four years of extensive and often intensive treatments. Of t...
Article
Full-text available
Deepwater Horizon was the largest marine oil spill in U.S. waters, oiling large expanses of coastal wetland shorelines. We compared marsh periwinkle (Littoraria irrorata) density and shell length at salt marsh sites with heavy oiling to reference conditions ~16 months after oiling. We also compared periwinkle density and size among oiled sites with...
Article
Full-text available
The Deepwater Horizon oil spill affected hundreds of kilometers of coastal wetland shorelines, including salt marshes with persistent heavy oiling that required intensive shoreline "cleanup" treatment. Oiled marsh treatment involves a delicate balance among: removing oil, speeding the degradation of remaining oil, protecting wildlife, fostering hab...
Article
To better understand the distribution of remaining lingering subsurface oil residues from the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS) sequestered in the intertidal along the shorelines of Prince William Sound (PWS), AK, we revised previous modeling efforts to allow spatially explicit predictions of the distribution of subsurface oil. We used a set of pooled...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
299884: The oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico was documented as stranding on 1,773 kilometers (km; 1,102 miles) of shoreline as of May 2013. Of the shorelines oiled, beaches comprised 50.8%, marshes 44.9%, and other shoreline types 4.3%. One year after the spill began, oil remained on 830 km; two years later, oil remai...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
299454: Although there are approximately 20,000 shipwrecks in U.S. waters, we now know that most of them are unlikely to be substantial pollution threats. Using initial screening factors (age, location, construction material, propulsion type, type, and size), 573 wrecks were identified as potentially containing larger amounts of oil. Secondary scre...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
300097: After nearly 20 years of limited natural recovery following the Gulf War oil spill, surveys were conducted in 2009-2010 to identify where oil has persisted and ecological recovery has been slow along the Arabian Gulf coastline of Saudi Arabia. In 2011-2013, large-scale remediation projects were executed on 3 locations totaling 155 hectares...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
300273: Achieving consensus on cleanup endpoints for inland oil spills can be difficult. They tend to be more stringent than those applied to spills in the marine environment and often require more intensive cleanup methods with the risk of increased ecological impacts. There are limited data on which to evaluate net environmental benefit considera...
Article
Full-text available
A synthesis of the literature on impacts of oil on marshes was conducted as a joint project by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and American Petroleum Institute. The goal was to summarize the scientific literature and experience from past spills in a format that balances between too much detail and too many generalizations. Suffi...
Article
Full-text available
An evaluation was made of the amounts and types of oil potentially released from sunken vessels in U.S. waters, where oil would be transported, how rapidly it would reach sensitive resources, and magnitudes of impacts on surface water and shorelines. Oil spill modeling was performed as part of a screening analysis to identify those sunken vessels o...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Deepwater Horizon oil spill resulted in persistent heavy oiling in salt marshes, particularly in northern Barataria Bay, Louisiana. Oiling conditions and several ecological variables were compared among reference plots and three types of heavily oiled plots located along a continuous shoreline area in northern Barataria Bay: oiled control plots...
Article
Full-text available
The Shoreline Cleanup and Assessment Technique (SCAT) process, from initial reconnaissance, to generation of Shoreline Treatment Recommendations (STRs) and signoff, is an integral part of oil spill response operations. It is and should remain flexible and scalable based on spill conditions. Several challenging spill responses have contributed to th...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico was documented as stranding on 1,773 kilometers (km; 1,102 miles) of shoreline as of May 2013. Of the shorelines oiled, beaches comprised 50.8%, marshes 44.9%, and other shoreline types 4.3%. One year after the spill began, oil remained on 830 km; two years later, oil remained on 6...
Article
Full-text available
In a review of the literature on impacts of spilled oil on marshes, 32 oil spills and field experiments were identified with sufficient data to generate recovery curves and identify influencing factors controlling the rate of recovery. For many spills, recovery occurred within 1-2 growing seasons, even in the absence of any treatment. Recovery was...
Article
Full-text available
As part of a recent marine oil spill risk assessment for the state of Alaska, a model of environmental vulnerability was developed to determine the relative vulnerability of broad geographic regions to spilled oil. This environmental vulnerability model is based on the underlying vulnerability of habitats and representative species present in each...
Article
Full-text available
Nixon, Z.; Michel, J.; Hayes, M.O.; Irvine, G.V., and Short, J., 2013. Geomorphic factors related to the persistence of subsurface oil from the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Oil from the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill has persisted along shorelines of Prince William Sound, Alaska, for more than two decades as both surface and subsurface oil residues. To bet...
Article
Full-text available
A flow of key information links marine spatial planning (MSP) and oil spill risk analysis (OSRA), two distinct processes needed to achieve true sustainable management of coastal and marine areas. OSRA informs MSP on areas of high risk to oil spills allowing a redefinition of planning objectives and the relocation of activities to increase the ecosy...
Article
Full-text available
The oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico was documented by shoreline assessment teams as stranding on 1,773 km of shoreline. Beaches comprised 50.8%, marshes 44.9%, and other shoreline types 4.3% of the oiled shoreline. Shoreline cleanup activities were authorized on 660 km, or 73.3% of oiled beaches and up to 71 km, or 8...
Data
Figure S1, The two step process by which the shoreline oiling descriptors generate the oiling degree category to be assigned to each shoreline segment. In the first step, the width of the oiled band and the % oil distribution determine the initial oiling category; in the second step, the oil thickness determines the final oiling category. Table S1,...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Deepwater Horizon oil spill resulted in heavy oiling conditions in the salt marshes of Northern Barataria Bay, including portions of Bay Jimmy, Bay Batiste, Wilkinson Bay, St. Mary’s Point, and vicinity. Following source control and the completion of nearshore on-water recovery and bulk oil removal from many shoreline areas, persistent oiling c...
Article
Full-text available
Review of historical information on the thousands of sunken vessels along the U.S. coast has identified those with significant volumes of oil remaining on-board. Screening analyses are being performed to identify those wrecks of highest risk with respect to environmental and socioeconomic impacts, and those identified will be subject to more detail...
Article
The chapter describes that the spills of submerged oil pose special challenges during all phases of an emergency response. Submerged oils are difficult to track and locate; there are no proven containment methods for either oil suspended in the water column or deposited on the seafloor; underwater recovery methods are complex, expensive, and ineffi...
Article
Full-text available
This chapter highlights the 1991 Gulf War Oil Spill. The release of 11 million barrels of crude oil into the Arabian Gulf during the 1991 Gulf War resulted in the largest oil spill in history. Maximum oil was transported to the south along the shoreline, where bulk of floating oil got trapped behind Abu Ali Island, and north of Jubail, Saudi Arabia...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique (SCAT) program is an integral component of spill response, operated under the Environmental Unit of the Planning Section under the Incident Command System. The benefit of SCAT is that it is flexible yet follows systematic processes for collecting and providing information to support cleanup operations. NOA...
Article
Full-text available
Many sheltered intertidal habitats along Saudi Arabia's east coast impacted by the 1991 Gulf War oil spill still exhibit signs of ecological degradation. Lack of plant and animal biomass recovery is evident, with presumed loss of many ecosystem functions attributed to intertidal habitats. While natural processes have restored some ecosystem health...
Poster
Full-text available
Seven years after the spill of an estimated 140,000 gallons of a mixture of No. 6 and No. 2 fuel oils into the Patuxent River, a study was conducted to assess recovery at 24 oiled sites compared with 24 unoiled sites. Metrics included stem density, stem height, belowground biomass and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) at depths of 0–10 cm and...
Article
Full-text available
Under federal regulations, natural resource trustees are charged with making the environment whole after injury to or loss of natural resources and services as a result of anthropogenic activities such as waste sites, vessel groundings, or oil spills. Here we provide a case study that uses the Habitat Equivalency Analysis (HEA) model to quantify in...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study used field data and a suite of geospatial models to identify areas where subsurface oil is likely to still be present on the shorelines of Prince William Sound (PWS) and the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) affected by the Exxon Valdez oil spill, as well as the factors related to continued presence of such oil. The goal was to identify factors and a...
Article
Full-text available
The shoreline treatment program for the Macondo oil spill response following the Deep Horizon incident in April 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico involved the development of strategies and tactics for a range of oiling conditions on sand, wetland and man-made shore types. The response was characterized by three strategic phases: (1) spring/summer 2010 on-...
Article
Full-text available
The Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique (SCAT) program for the response to the Deep Water Horizon MC252 incident in April 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico addressed two key challenges: the scale of the affected area and the long response duration with potential for reoiling before well capping was achieved and then final cleanup being carried out in p...
Article
Full-text available
Oil from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout was deposited during May-July 2010 in the supratidal zone (i.e., landward of the high tide line) of beaches during major storms in the Gulf of Mexico, then became buried during beach accretion. As of winter 2010, there were still significant amounts of buried oil in the supratidal zone because of the lac...