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Jacqueline Laughland-Booy

Jacqueline Laughland-Booy
Australian Catholic University Sydney · Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Education)

PhD

About

19
Publications
2,579
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Citations
Introduction
Dr Jacqueline Laughland-Booÿ is a Research Fellow with the Social Futures and Life Pathways of Young People in Queensland project at Australian Catholic University, Australia. She is also an Adjunct Research Fellow in the School of Social Sciences at Monash University.Her research interests are in the fields of life-course studies and political sociology. Her current research relates to young people and the future of work, and the experiences of young adults who live in regional, rural, and remote Queensland.

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Happiness is an inescapable notion within everyday life and central to the human experience. With evidence that happiness decreases significantly between adolescence and adulthood, this article aims to inform further exploration of why this is so, by first understanding how young people define happiness. In this article, we present data from 29 in-...
Chapter
This chapter offers a critical perspective on one of the oldest and most consistent claims made for compulsory voting in Australia, namely that it would encourage greater citizen engagement with, and understanding of, the political system. The chapter focuses on the development of political knowledge and skills of young citizens and how they become...
Article
Full-text available
In order to confidently participate in the democratic process, citizens from liberal democracies require knowledge about how their nation’s system of politics and government functions. For the past 30 years, successive Australian governments have endeavoured to educate school students about the political system via a civics and citizenship curricul...
Article
Over the coming decades, technology and automation are expected to dramatically transform how work will be undertaken. While many of these developments will improve productivity and provide new opportunities, some jobs will likely disappear. In this article, we report data from in‐depth interviews undertaken with 51 young Australians about their st...
Article
Full-text available
This article offers a broad overview of how the concept of cosmopolitanism can inform an understanding of the acceptance of asylum seekers by members of settled populations. We begin with a brief history of cosmopolitan thought before summarising how the concept is understood in contemporary social theory. We then propose a theoretical framework wh...
Article
Young adults in Australia, and in many other advanced countries, are more likely to be highly educated but less likely to be in full-time employment than their parents were. Although insecure employment has long been a feature of labour markets, increased labour flexibility in recent decades has resulted in insecure employment becoming entrenched....
Article
This study offers a new framework for understanding the decision-making strategies of first-time voters. Using data from in-depth interviews with young people prior to the 2013 Australian federal election, the paper explores the extent to which our participants were knowledgeable about the upcoming election and the degree to which they invested cog...
Article
In Australia, questions surrounding national identity often feature in public discussions on asylum seekers. Using qualitative interview data collected from 40 participants in an ongoing study of young people in Queensland, we explore the connections between young people’s understandings of Australian national identity and their attitudes towards ‘...
Article
This paper provides insights into young people's experiences of transitions from adolescence into emerging adulthood by focusing on connections between their career identity formation, time perspectives, and future outlook. The data used in this paper are based on two sets of in-depth interviews undertaken with 28 young people when they were aged 1...
Article
In many industrialized countries, the transition into adulthood has become prolonged and complex. The consequence is that the process of identity formation within various life domains is often being delayed. This study applies a qualitative longitudinal research strategy to track the experiences of 28 young Australians as they undergo the process o...
Article
Young people are remaining in the parental home for longer, and returning there more often, before attaining residential independence. In Australia, these patterns have prompted concerns about a ‘boomerang generation’ whose housing aspirations and decisions have either been directly questioned, or viewed as symptomatic of broader affordability issu...
Article
This paper uses interview data collected from young people in Queensland, Australia, to report the narratives of young Australians on the issue of ‘boat people’ and to explore the ‘accepting’ viewpoint. Consistent with existing literature, the ‘anti-asylum’ interviewees construct symbolic boundaries via language to justify why they believe exclusio...
Article
Full-text available
Young people making future career choices are doing so in an environment that often highlights the benefits supposedly wrought by individualisation and reflexive choice. It is argued that those who demonstrate reflexivity in their decision-making would have an advantage in the negotiation of future risks. The authors of this article agree with theo...
Article
There has been intense debate in Australia regarding how asylum seekers who arrive by boat should be treated. Some call for compassion towards those prepared to risk their lives to seek protection, whereas others believe ‘boat people’ should not be allowed into the country. This article uses data from a large representative sample of young people i...

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Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
Also known as ‘Our Lives’, this is one of the first Australian large-scale, representative longitudinal studies to investigate the changing nature of contemporary youth from the beginning of secondary school and into adulthood. It has been combining large-scale survey research with in-depth qualitative interviewing in order to ascertain how global uncertainty and social traditions, institutions, and inequalities structure the life pathways of young people in Australia.