Jacqueline Marie Chapman

Jacqueline Marie Chapman
Ecofish Research Ltd

PhD

About

36
Publications
8,938
Reads
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716
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - December 2016
Carleton University
Position
  • Instructor
Description
  • BIOL 4503 Fish Ecology, Conservation and Management
Education
September 2014 - September 2018
Carleton University
Field of study
  • Biology
January 2012 - May 2014
Carleton University
Field of study
  • Biology
September 2009 - August 2011
University of Manitoba
Field of study
  • Biological Science

Publications

Publications (36)
Article
Full-text available
Increase in fine sediments in freshwater resulting from anthropogenic development is a potential stressor for fish and thus may cause population declines. Though a large body of literature exists on the topic, there have been few attempts to synthesize this information in a quantitative manner. Through meta-analysis we investigated the effects of s...
Article
Full-text available
The effective and appropriate bridging of Western science with traditional or Indigenous knowledge is an ongoing discussion in the literature and in practice. The discourse transitioned from separate knowledge system to knowledge integration and most recently to knowledge co-production. We argue it is the moral and ethical responsibility of Western...
Article
Full-text available
For Pacific salmon captured and released by fisheries, post-release behaviour and survival may be influenced by their health and condition at time of capture. We sought to characterize the interactions between infectious agent burden, fish immune and stress physiology and fisheries stressors to investigate the potential for capture-mediated pathoge...
Article
Full-text available
Surmounting evidence supports that infectious agents play a critical role in shaping fish physiology, behaviour, and survival. The exclusion of disease-causing agents from fisheries research has resulted in major knowledge gaps that may limit the predictive capacity of ecological models. A major barrier in wild fisheries epidemiology is the logisti...
Article
Full-text available
Shore‐based shark fishing in Florida is rarely monitored as it largely occurs at night on remote beaches and has received a questionable reputation after recent exposure of illegal activity. While these events have led to calls for better management and enforcement, the characteristics of the fishery itself remain largely unknown. Our study, theref...
Article
Incorporating host-pathogen(s)-environment axes into management and conservation planning is critical to preserving species in a warming climate. However, the role pathogens play in host stress resilience remains largely unexplored in wild animal populations. We experimentally characterized how independent and cumulative stressors (fisheries handli...
Article
Full-text available
For better or for worse, authorship is a currency in scholarly research and advancement. In scholarly writing, authorship is widely acknowledged as a means of conferring credit but is also tied to concepts such as responsibility and accountability. Authorship is one of the most divisive topics both at the level of the research team and more broadly...
Article
Full-text available
• Anadromous Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) populations have declined across their Southern distributions in North America. While river temperature has been identified as a central factor influencing migration behavior and over-winter survival, little research has addressed the prevalence of infectious agents in wild Atlantic salmon populations. Fur...
Preprint
Incorporating host-pathogen(s)-environment axes into management and conservation planning is critical to preserving species in a warming climate. However, the role pathogens play in host stress resilience remains largely unexplored in wild animal populations. We experimentally characterized how independent and cumulative stressors (fisheries handli...
Article
Although it is assumed that the outcomes from scientific research inform management and policy, the so‐called knowledge–action gap (i.e., the disconnect between scientific knowledge and its application) is a recognition that there are many reasons why new knowledge is not always embraced by knowledge users. The concept of knowledge co‐production ha...
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge coevolution is the process through which information is generated by joining knowledge systems in an inclusive and iterative way to facilitate self-determination of communities and promote cultural resilience. A central and practical component of this framework is the fostering of progress towards improved co-management and community led...
Article
Full-text available
Teaching can be a rewarding, yet challenging, experience for early career researchers (ECRs) in fields like ecology and evolution. Much of this challenge arises from the reality that ECRs in ecology and evolution typically receive little, if any, pedagogical training or advice on how to balance teaching, research (which can include extended field w...
Article
Acoustic telemetry is a popular tool for long‐term tracking of aquatic animals to describe and quantify patterns of movement, space use, and diverse ecological interactions. Acoustic receivers are imperfect sampling instruments, and their detection range (DR; the area surrounding the receiver in which tag transmissions can be detected) often varies...
Article
Full-text available
Anadromous fishes such as steelhead trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, are exposed to a suite of infectious agents and migratory challenges during their freshwater migrations. We assessed infectious agent load and richness and immune system gene expression in gill tissue of Bulkley River (British Columbia, CA) steelhead captured at and upstream of a migra...
Article
We investigated the response of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to capture and handling stressors by analyzing fine-scale locomotor activity using accelerometer data loggers and broader-scale movements by tracking migration with radiotelemetry. Half the sample population was exposed to experimental exercise and air exposure and released with a contro...
Article
Full-text available
Discarding non‐target fish from commercial fisheries is controversial and has been a persistent concern for fisheries managers globally. Discard management strategies typically begin by understanding mortality rates among discarded fish, a challenging task given the dynamic, highly context‐specific nature of fisheries. An alternative is to develop...
Article
Biotelemetry data have been successfully incorporated into aspects of fishery and fish habitat management; however, the processes of knowledge mobilization are rarely published in peer-reviewed literature but are valuable and of interest to conservation scientists. Here, we explore case examples from the Ocean Tracking Network (OTN), including Paci...
Article
Full-text available
Recreational catch‐and‐release angling is a popular activity. Anglers often use landing nets to shorten fight times, reduce stress on the line and rod, restrict fish movement to facilitate dehooking of the fish, and protect fish from undue harm caused by handling or dropping. Landing nets are constructed using a variety of netting materials that co...
Article
Full-text available
Recreational catch-and-release angling is a popular activity. Anglers often use landing nets to shorten fight times, reduce stress on the line and rod, restrict fish movement to facilitate dehooking of fish, and protect fish from undue harm from handling or dropping. Landing nets are constructed using a variety of netting materials that could have...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The number of fish that encounter fishing gear is greater than the number of fish retained as catch. The proportion of this difference that die from the encounter is defined as fishing-related incidental mortality (FRIM). FRIM estimates are required for improved stock assessments, but they are difficult to attain and vary across fisheries. To cope...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation physiology has emerged as a discipline with many success stories. Yet, it is unclear how conservation physiology is currently integrated into the activities of bodies such as the IUCN and other agencies/organizations/bodies which undertake international, national, or regional species threat assessments and work with partners to develop...
Article
The objective of catch-and-release angling is for the fish to survive with minimal fitness consequences. However, fish survival can be compromised by a number of factors, especially anatomical hooking location. To evaluate whether hook type or bait influence hooking outcomes, we tested different combinations of hook (treble or single siwash hooks)...
Article
Abstract Changes in land use have manifold effects on stream ecosystems. Consequently, the degradation of watersheds can cause extreme responses if the resilience of the stream is exceeded, triggering changes in fish communities and a reorganization of the ecosystem. Fish community surveys are frequently used to evaluate the impact of anthropogenic...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic alterations to terrestrial habitat (e.g., urbanization, deforestation, agriculture) can have a variety of negative effects on watercourses that flow through disturbed landscapes. Currently, the relationship between stream habitat quality and fish condition remains poorly understood. The use of physiological metrics such as glucocortic...
Article
Full-text available
Migration is a widespread phenomenon among many taxa. This complex behaviour enables animals to exploit many temporally productive and spatially discrete habitats to accrue various fitness benefits (e.g. growth, reproduction, predator avoidance). Human activities and global environmental change represent potential threats to migrating animals (from...
Article
Full-text available
Land use changes within watersheds can have large effects on stream ecosystems, but the mechanistic basis of those effects remains poorly understood. While changes to population size presumably reflect underlying variation in organismal health and condition, such individual-level metrics are rarely evaluated in the context of ecosystem disturbance....
Article
Full-text available
Both coastal wetlands and tributaries of waterbodies provide important and distinct habitat for freshwater fishes. While diel migration into and out of these systems is known to occur for some species, the resulting changes in fish assemblage composition and dominance are less well understood. To evaluate diel changes in the fish assemblages of a c...
Article
Full-text available
In a human-altered world where biodiversity is in decline and conservation problems abound, there is a dire need to ensure that the next generation of conservation scientists have the knowledge, skills, and training to address these problems. So called ''early career researchers'' (ECRs) in conservation science have many challenges before them and...
Article
Full-text available
Humans have dramatically altered landscapes as a result of urban and agricultural development, which has led to decreases in the quality and quantity of habitats for animals. This is particularly the case for freshwater fish that reside in fluvial systems, given that changes to adjacent lands have direct impacts on the structure and function of wat...
Conference Paper
Changes in land use within watersheds are known to influence fish populations in stream ecosystems, though the physiological mechanisms behind population-level changes remain elusive. Winter is a challenging period for north temperate stream fish and thus is a logical period to evaluate how individual-level metrics related to energetic condition an...
Conference Paper
Global degradation of wetland ecosystems presents one of the largest threats to biodiversity, with habitat fragmentation, homogenization, and decreasing water quality acting as the primary drivers. Habitat restoration and enhancement have become common conservation practices aimed at restoring ecosystem function and ultimately facilitating biodiver...
Article
Full-text available
Smartphones and digital tablets are used to collect data for agricultural, geographical, and medical research. Science professionals find these devices attractive because they contain many useful hardware accessories (e.g., camera, Global Positioning System [GPS], accelerometer) and the capacity to access and customize software applications (apps)....

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