Jacopo Orsilli

Jacopo Orsilli
Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca | UNIMIB · Department of Materials Science

Master of Science

About

9
Publications
819
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
30
Citations
Introduction
I'm a PhD student in Material Science at the University of Milano Bicocca. I'm working on the analysis of layered cultural heritage artifacts by means of XRF, μ-CF-XRF, GE-XRF and Monte Carlo simulations. As PhD project I'm developing a system to perform grazing emission analysis with tabletop and portable XRF instruments.
Additional affiliations
November 2019 - present
Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca
Position
  • PhD Student
October 2017 - October 2019
University of Milan
Position
  • Master's Student
Description
  • Application of Ka/Kb and La/Lb ratio and MC-simulation for the quantitative analysis of multilayered samples of Archaeological, Artistic and Historical interest, such as layered or altered alloys, glasses, ceramics and painted artifacts.
October 2016 - June 2017
University of Milan
Position
  • Student
Description
  • Analysis of miliacin traces in archaeological soils of the Po Valley, Italy, by means of GC-MS to infer past millet (Panicum miliaceum) cultivation.

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
Full-text available
The project FUXYA2020 was intended to design and prototype a low-cost basic energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer for all those cases where there is not enough financial support to buy a commercial device. Indeed, home-made instruments are ideal when funds are low but constant over the years, as this approach allows the costs to be spre...
Article
Among the possible variants of X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), applications exploiting scanning Macro-XRF (MA-XRF) are lately widespread as they allow the visualization of the element distribution maintaining a non-destructive approach. The surface is scanned with a focused or collimated X-ray beam of millimeters or less: analyzing the emitted fluorescen...
Article
Full-text available
Among the possible variants of X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), applications exploiting scanning Macro-XRF (MA-XRF) are lately widespread as they allow the visualization of the element distribution maintaining a non-destructive approach. The surface is scanned with a focused or collimated X-ray beam of millimeters or less: analyzing the emitted fluorescen...
Article
Lapis lazuli use stretches back more than 6500 years; ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, Greece, and Rome treasured and prized it. Afghanistan has been the oldest source for this stone, while Chile, Canada, Russia and a few other countries have been reported as sources for raw material in more recent times; the rarity of historical...
Article
Pulsed thermography was exploited to identify the presence of glass defects in order to get an indication of the conservation status of archaeological glass. Indeed, the process of degradation in artifacts subjected to centuries of burial can be of great relevance. More specifically, we evaluated the potential of pulsed thermography to map the pres...
Article
Full-text available
The use of non-invasive analytical techniques on cultural heritage objects usually faces the insurmountable limit of dealing with artworks subjected to more restorations. For painted surfaces, imaging techniques, such as infrared photography (NIR) and ultraviolet-induced visible fluorescence (UVIVF), allow to distinguish areas with different kind a...
Article
The process of degradation of archaeological glass subjected to centuries of burial can be of great relevance: typical consequence of degradation in the original vitreous material is rainbow-like iridescence due to chemical alteration of surface layers, salts formation and ion migration. The research presented in this paper is focused on the study...
Article
Full-text available
The process of degradation in artefacts subjected to centuries of burial can be of great relevance above all in archaeological glass. Infrared thermography is a non-destructive method allowing to map the defects of the glass substrate, both produced during its manufacturing (e.g., bubbles and inclusions) and due to ageing. This research is focused...

Network

Cited By