Jacob G. Mills

Jacob G. Mills
University of Adelaide · School of Biological Sciences

BSc Advanced, 1C Honours
PhD Candidate in urban microbial ecology.

About

18
Publications
10,224
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705
Citations
Citations since 2016
18 Research Items
700 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
Introduction
Researching urban ecology of plants, humans, and microbiota for improving public health via biodiverse interactions | Also researching regenerative agriculture | Twitter @MicroRewilding

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
Creating biodiverse urban habitat has been proposed, with growing empirical support, as an intervention for increasing human microbial diversity and reducing associated diseases. However, ecological understanding of urban biodiversity interventions on human skin microbiota remains limited. Here, we experimentally test the hypotheses that disturbed...
Article
Full-text available
Vegetation complexity is potentially important for urban green space designs aimed at fostering microbial biodiversity to benefit human health. Exposure to urban microbial biodiversity may influence human health outcomes via immune training and regulation. In this context, improving human exposure to microbiota via biodiversity-centric urban green...
Preprint
Full-text available
The planting and conservation of biodiverse habitat in urban contexts has been proposed as a public health intervention aimed at reducing the prevalence of non-communicable diseases via microbiome rewilding (Mills et al. 2017; Mills et al. 2019). However, our understanding of the effect of urban biodiversity interventions on the human microbiota re...
Article
Full-text available
The United Nations heralded 2021–2030 as the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration. A socio‐ecological approach to restoration has been proposed that honours the diversity in ecological landscapes and their respective cultures and peoples with the goal of repairing degraded ecosystems. Indigenous Peoples are intimately interconnected with landscapes,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Vegetation complexity is potentially important for urban green space designs aimed at fostering microbial biodiversity to benefit human health. Exposure to urban microbial biodiversity may influence human health outcomes via immune training and regulation. In this context, improving human exposure to microbiota via biodiversity-centric urban green...
Article
Full-text available
Background: In industrialized countries, non-communicable diseases have been increasing in prevalence since the middle of the 20th century. While the causal mechanisms remain poorly understood, increased population density, pollution, sedentary behavior, smoking, changes in diet, and limited outdoor exposure have all been proposed as significant c...
Article
Full-text available
Restoration interventions such as revegetation are globally-important to combat biodiversity declines and land degradation. However, restoration projects are generally poorly monitored because current approaches to monitoring are limited in their ability to assess important components of biodiversity, such as belowground microbial diversity. Since...
Article
Full-text available
Many non‐communicable diseases are linked to degraded diversity in the human and environmental microbiota and are rising globally in epidemic proportions in industrialized urban populations. Reducing this disease burden may be aided by the ecological restoration of microbiota and their habitat in urban green spaces – a process termed microbiome rew...
Article
Growing epidemiological evidence links natural green space exposure with a range of health benefits, including for mental health. Conversely, greater urbanisation associates with increased risk of mental health disorders. Microbiomes are proposed as an important but understudied link that may help explain many green space-human health associations....
Article
Full-text available
Large-scale restoration efforts are underway globally to mitigate the impact of decades of land degradation by returning functional and biodiverse ecosystems. Revegetation is a heavily relied upon restoration intervention, and one that is expected to result in associated biodiversity returns. However, the outcome of such restoration interventions r...
Article
Full-text available
Billions of hectares of natural ecosystems have been degraded through human actions. The global community has agreed on targets to halt and reverse these declines, and the restoration sector faces the important but arduous task of implementing programmes to meet these objectives. Existing and emerging genomics tools offer the potential to improve t...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how microbial communities change with environmental degradation and restoration may offer new insights into the understudied ecology that connects humans, microbiota, and the natural world. Immunomodulatory microbial diversity and ‘Old Friends’ are thought to be supplemented from biodiverse natural environments, yet deficient in anthr...
Article
Full-text available
A relatively unaccounted ecosystem service from biodiversity is the benefit to human health via symbiotic microbiota from our environment. This benefit occurs because humans evolved alongside microbes and have been constantly exposed to diverse microbiota. Plants and animals, including humans, are organised as a host with symbiotic microbiota, whos...
Article
Full-text available
Principles of ecology apply at myriad scales, including within the human body and the intertwined macro and microscopic ecosystems that we depend upon for survival. The conceptual principles of dysbiosis (‘life in distress’) also apply to different realms of life—our microbiome, the macro environment and the socioeconomic domain. Viewing the human...
Article
Full-text available
Restoration aims to return ecosystem services, including the human health benefits of exposure to green space. The loss of such exposure with urbanization and industrialization has arguably contributed to an increase in human immune dysregulation. The Biodiversity and Old Friends hypotheses have described the possible mechanisms of this relationshi...
Article
Full-text available
Ecological restoration is a globally important and well-financed management intervention used to combat biodiversity declines and land degradation. Most restoration aims to increase biodiversity towards a reference state, but there are concerns that intended outcomes are not reached due to unsuccessful interventions and land use legacy issues. Moni...

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