Jacob Lewis

Jacob Lewis
Washington State University | WSU · School of Politics, Philosophy, and Public Affairs

PhD, Political Science

About

4
Publications
953
Reads
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19
Citations
Citations since 2016
4 Research Items
19 Citations
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Introduction
My research focuses on international and comparative conflict processes, governance, and social trust. I focus on the developing world, with a primary interest in African politics and a secondary specialization in the Middle East.
Additional affiliations
May 2020 - present
Washington State University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2019 - May 2020
Pennsylvania State University, the Behrend College
Position
  • Professor
August 2013 - May 2019
University of Maryland, College Park
Position
  • Graduate Assistant
Education
August 2013 - May 2019
University of Maryland, College Park
Field of study
  • Political Science
September 2008 - May 2010
American University of Paris
Field of study
  • Strategic Public Policy & International Affairs
September 2002 - May 2006
Hobart and William Smith Colleges
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (4)
Article
Full-text available
This article examines how proximate exposure to violent conflict events affects levels of social trust. We argue that since exposure to conflict heightens perceptions of threat, individuals who were proximately exposed to conflict events should exhibit lower levels of generalized and out-group social trust than individuals not subject to such expos...
Article
South African politics are in a period of transition; the dominant ANC is in decline, support for opposition parties has been rising, and voters have been disengaging rapidly from the electoral process. As protest movements have become more common and more powerful, established political parties have increasingly led their own protests, often addre...
Article
Full-text available
Does corruption increase general and anti-government protest? Scholarship has produced seemingly incompatible results, with some research demonstrating a strong connection between corruption and the onset of contentious politics and other research finding that heightened perceptions of corruption decrease activism. This article addresses this puzzl...
Article
When do nonviolent protests escalate into violence? Existing literature has focused primarily on campaign-level escalations and only recently has work begun to examine protest event-level escalations. We build on this emerging literature and develop an argument for why some protests escalate to violence. We use statistical analysis and find that vi...

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