Jacob Diamond

Jacob Diamond
French National Institute for Agriculture, Food, and Environment (INRAE) | INRAE

Doctor of Philosophy

About

18
Publications
2,382
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152
Citations
Introduction
Post-doctoral researcher at Irstea with Florentina Moatar and Gilles Pinay. Interested in ecosystem ecology, watershed hydrology, wetlands, complexity, emergence, environmental data analysis, resource management.

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Spatial reconstruction of stream temperature is relevant to water quality standards and fisheries management, yet large, regional scale datasets are rare because data are decentralized and inharmonious. This data discordance is a major limitation for understanding thermal regimes of riverine ecosystems. To overcome this barrier, we first aggregated...
Article
Full-text available
Stream temperature appears to be increasing globally, but its rate remains poorly constrained due to a paucity of long-term data and difficulty in parsing effects of hydroclimate and landscape variability. Here, we address these issues using the physically based thermal model T-NET (Temperature-NETwork) coupled with the EROS semi-distributed hydrol...
Article
Aquatic ecosystem recovery from anthropogenic degradation can be hampered by internal feedbacks that stabilize undesirable states. The challenges of managing and predicting alternative states in lakes are well known, but state shifts in rivers and their attendant effects on ecosystem function remain understudied despite strong recent evidence that...
Article
Full-text available
An explosion in high frequency dissolved oxygen (DO) observations at river network scales is creating new opportunities to understand dynamic signals in streams and rivers. Among the most informative metrics obtained from DO time series is stream metabolism—comprising gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER)—but its estimation...
Preprint
Full-text available
Stream temperature appears to be increasing globally, but its rate remains poorly constrained due to a paucity of long-term data and difficulty in parsing effects of hydroclimate and landscape variability. Here, we address these issues using the physically-based thermal model T-NET (Temperature-NETwork) coupled with the EROS semi-distributed hydrol...
Article
Full-text available
Urbanization and subsequent expansion of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) capacity has the potential to alter stream metabolic regimes, but the magnitude of this change remains unknown. Indeed, our understanding of downstream WWTP effects on stream metabolism is spatially and temporally limited, and monitoring designs with upstream-downstream comp...
Preprint
Full-text available
Spatiotemporally comprehensive stream temperature datasets are rare because interest in these data is relatively recent and there is little money to support instrumentation at regional or national scales. This lack of data has been recognized as a major limitation for understanding thermal regimes of riverine ecosystems. To overcome these barriers,...
Article
Black ash (Fraxinus nigra) wetlands are widespread, forested landscape features in the western Great Lakes region. However, the future of these ecosystems is threatened due to impending spread of the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB), which results in tree mortality, decreased transpiration, and potential shifts to wetter, non‐forested conditions. T...
Article
Microtopography, or the small‐scale variation in ground surface height (10⁻¹–10⁰ m) over short (10⁰–10² m) spatial scales, is a ubiquitous feature of wetlands globally. This variation in elevation, characterized by local high (“hummocks”) and low (“hollows”) patches, is more structured than what is observed in uplands, and is intertwined with conco...
Article
Anthropogenic impoundments (e.g. large dams, small reservoirs, and ponds) are expanding in number globally, influencing downstream temperature regimes in a diversity of ways that depend on their structure and position along the river continuum. Because of the manifold downstream thermal responses, there has been a paucity of studies characterizing...
Article
Full-text available
All wetland ecosystems are controlled by water table and soil saturation dynamics, so any local-scale deviation in soil elevation and thus water table position represents variability in this primary control. Wetland microtopography is the structured variability in soil elevation and is typically categorized into a binary classification of local hig...
Article
Full-text available
Wetland microtopography is a visually striking feature, but also critically influences biogeochemical processes at both the scale of its observation (10 −2-10 2 m 2) and at aggregate scales (10 2-10 4 m 2). However, relatively little is known about how wetland microtopography develops or the factors influencing its structure and pattern. Growing re...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to quantify the downstream impacts of different types of small dams on summer water temperature in lowland streams. We examined (1) temperature regimes upstream and downstream of dams with different structural characteristics, (2) relationships between stream temperature anomalies and climatic variables, watershed area...
Article
Full-text available
Wetlands hold the highest density of belowground carbon stocks on earth, provide myriad biogeochemical and habitat functions, and are at increasing risk of degradation due to climate and land use change. Microtopographic variation is a common and functionally important feature of wetlands but is challenging to quantify, constraining estimates of th...
Article
Full-text available
Depressional wetlands are dominant features in many low‐gradient landscapes, where they provide water storage and exchange. Typical basin morphology enables water storage during drier periods, when surface flow paths are disconnected and exchange is limited to slower groundwater flow paths. Under wetter conditions, wetland stage can exceed surface...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The 2019 conference will serve as a venue for field scientists and modelers to develop a comprehensive vision of the future of catchment science. Catchment science uses intensive observation to understand how physical, chemical and biological processes interact to shape the landscape-scale functioning of ecosystems. It has frequently redefined paradigms of process understanding in hydrology, biogeochemistry, and ecology. However, transferring process knowledge to other sites and scaling knowledge to river basins has proven challenging. Advances in computing power have enabled the construction of integrated models at high spatial resolution and continental scale not only on grids but also on river reaches and their associated catchments. Is a reach-based landscape discretization more amenable to hypothesis testing than a gridded one because it captures physically meaningful landscape units? The ubiquitous predictions made by such models may provide a new approach to transcending the uniqueness of place. This conference will explore how field-based process understanding is integrated into high-resolution, spatially extensive models. The predictions of such models essentially represent a conjecture of how hypothesized catchment processes are integrated at river basin to continental scales. The conference will also explore how these processes change in a non-stationary environment. High-resolution land-surface data (e.g. DEMs, land cover, stream networks) coupled with high-performance computing have enabled initial development of such models which tend to focus on physical processes, but challenges remain to develop comparable data sets for the subsurface (e.g. mineralogy, hydraulic properties), and how to best capture the state of the art in our understanding of hydrology, biology, ecology and geochemistry. Conference sessions will consider the interplay between hypotheses, field observations, and models: How have "big data" techniques, such as data mining and pattern identification, impacted catchment science? Have high frequency sensor data provided new insights into hydrologic and biogeochemical processes? The GRC will also be preceded by a two-day Gordon Research Seminar (GRS) that is organized by and designed for graduate students and post-doctoral researchers. The GRS provides opportunities for the exchange of ideas among early career investigators and an occasion to build relationships with peers that will form the next generation of catchment scientists. GRS attendees are expected to join the GRC and share in the full experience. For information on the GRS, please contact one of the student GRS organizers. Link to the GRC website: https://www.grc.org/catchment-science-interactions-of-hydrology-biology-and-geochemistry-conference/2019/ Link to the GRS website: https://www.grc.org/catchment-science-interactions-of-hydrology-biology-and-geochemistry-grs-conference/2019/