Jacob Bellmund

Jacob Bellmund
Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences | CBS · Psychology

PhD

About

17
Publications
3,805
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
674
Citations
Introduction
I am a cognitive neuroscientist at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig (Germany). My research interests include spatial navigation and episodic memory. I am most curious about how coding principles in the hippocampal-entorhinal region enable flexible cognition. In my research, I combine fMRI with behavioral experiments and virtual reality technology.
Additional affiliations
December 2018 - present
Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2016 - November 2018
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Position
  • Researcher
November 2013 - October 2019
Radboud University
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
October 2008 - June 2013
Philipps University of Marburg
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
The hippocampal-entorhinal region supports memory for episodic details, such as temporal relations of sequential events, and mnemonic constructions combining experiences for inferential reasoning. However, it is unclear whether hippocampal event memories reflect temporal relations derived from mnemonic constructions, event order, or elapsing time,...
Preprint
Full-text available
The hippocampal-entorhinal region supports memory for episodic details, such as temporal relations of sequential events, and mnemonic constructions combining experiences for inferential reasoning. However, it is unclear whether hippocampal event representations reflect temporal relations derived from mnemonic constructions, event order, or elapsing...
Article
Full-text available
Advances in virtual reality (VR) technology have greatly benefited spatial navigation research. By presenting space in a controlled manner, changing aspects of the environment one at a time or manipulating the gain from different sensory inputs, the mechanisms underlying spatial behaviour can be investigated. In parallel, a growing body of evidence...
Article
In this issue of Neuron, Park et al. (2020) • Park S.A. • Miller D.S. • Nili H. • Ranganath C. • Boorman E.D. Map making: Constructing, combining, and inferring on abstract cognitive maps. Neuron. 2020; 107 ( this issue) : 1226-1238 • Abstract • Full Text • Full Text PDF • PubMed • Scopus (1) • Google Scholar show that the brain forms unified c...
Preprint
Full-text available
Advances in virtual reality (VR) technology have greatly benefited spatial navigation research. By presenting space in a controlled manner, changing aspects of the environment one at a time or manipulating the gain from different sensory inputs, the mechanisms underlying behaviour can be investigated. In parallel, a growing body of evidence suggest...
Article
Episodic memories are constructed from sequences of events. When recalling such a memory, we not only recall individual events, but we also retrieve information about how the sequence of events unfolded. Here, we focus on the role of the hippocampal–entorhinal region in processing and remembering sequences of events, which are thought to be stored...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental boundaries anchor cognitive maps that support memory. However, trapezoidal boundary geometry distorts the regular firing patterns of entorhinal grid cells, proposedly providing a metric for cognitive maps. Here we test the impact of trapezoidal boundary geometry on human spatial memory using immersive virtual reality. Consistent with...
Article
Full-text available
Remembering event sequences is central to episodic memory and presumably supported by the hippocampal-entorhinal region. We previously demonstrated that the hippocampus maps spatial and temporal distances between events encountered along a route through a virtual city (Deuker et al., 2016), but the content of entorhinal mnemonic representations rem...
Preprint
Full-text available
Remembering event sequences is central to episodic memory and presumably supported by the hippocampal-entorhinal region. We previously demonstrated that the hippocampus maps spatial and temporal distances between events encountered along a route through a virtual city (Deuker et al., 2016), but the content of entorhinal mnemonic representations rem...
Article
The hippocampal formation has long been suggested to underlie both memory formation and spatial navigation. We discuss how neural mechanisms identified in spatial navigation research operate across information domains to support a wide spectrum of cognitive functions. In our framework, place and grid cell population codes provide a representational...
Preprint
Full-text available
Environmental boundaries anchor cognitive maps that support memory. However, trapezoidal boundary geometry distorts the regular firing patterns of entorhinal grid cells proposedly providing a metric for cognitive maps. Here, we test the impact of trapezoidal boundary geometry on human spatial memory using immersive virtual reality. Consistent with...
Article
Full-text available
Entorhinal grid cells map the local environment, but their involvement beyond spatial navigation remains elusive. We examined human functional MRI responses during a highly controlled visual tracking task and show that entorhinal cortex exhibited a sixfold rotationally symmetric signal encoding gaze direction. Our results provide evidence for a gri...
Article
The hippocampus has long been implicated in both episodic and spatial memory, however these mnemonic functions have been traditionally investigated in separate research strands. Theoretical accounts and rodent data suggest a common mechanism for spatial and episodic memory in the hippocampus by providing an abstract and flexible representation of t...
Data
Average absolute angular errors.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17089.004
Data
Searchlight results for absolute directional coding analysis.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17089.009
Data
Pattern similarity difference between 0° modulo 60° and 30° modulo 60° condition in left and right posterior medial entorhinal cortex.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17089.013
Article
Full-text available
Anticipating the future is a key motif of the brain, possibly supported by mental simulation of upcoming events. Rodent single-cell recordings suggest the ability of spatially tuned cells to represent subsequent locations. Grid-like representations have been observed in the human entorhinal cortex during virtual and imagined navigation. However, hi...

Network

Cited By