Jaco de Smit

Jaco de Smit
HZ University of Applied Sciences · Building with Nature

Master of Science

About

18
Publications
3,791
Reads
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163
Citations
Citations since 2017
17 Research Items
162 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
Additional affiliations
June 2021 - October 2022
NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research
Position
  • Postdoc
February 2020 - June 2020
King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
Position
  • Visiting Researcher
January 2017 - June 2021
NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
September 2014 - August 2016
Utrecht University
Field of study
  • Earth Surface & Water
September 2011 - August 2014
Utrecht University
Field of study
  • Earth Sciences

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
Seagrasses and bare sediment represent alternative stable states, with sediment resuspension being a key driver of system stability via the Seagrass-Sediment-Light (SSL) feedback. We explore the SSL feedback by quantifying the sediment stabilization by seagrass, and using these measurements to calculate under which conditions seagrass ends up in a...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the well‐recognized importance of plant traits for biogeomorphic development of landscapes, our understanding remains limited of how species‐specific plant traits respond to and serve as drivers for the sedimentary dynamics within a biogeomorphic landscape. By manipulating a series of laboratory experiments, using mesocosms and a flume, we...
Article
Full-text available
Abundant research has shown that macrobenthic species are able to increase sediment erodibility through bioturbation. So far, however, this has been at the level of individual species. Consequently, we lack understanding on how such species effects act on the level of bioturbator communities. We assessed the isolated and combined effects of three b...
Article
Large grazers (megaherbivores) have a profound impact on ecosystem functioning. However, how ecosystem multifunctionality is affected by changes in megaherbivore populations remains poorly understood. Understanding the total impact on ecosystem multifunctionality requires an integrative ecosystem approach, which is especially challenging to obtain...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the sensitivity of tidal flats to environmental changes is challenging. Currently, most studies rely on process-based models to systematically explain the morphodynamic evolution of tidal flats. In this study, we proposed an alternative empirical approach to explore tidal flat dynamics using statistical indices based on long-term time...
Article
Full-text available
Combining foreshore ecosystems like saltmarshes and mangroves with traditional hard engineering structures may offer a more sustainable solution to coastal protection than engineering structures alone. However, foreshore ecosystems, are rapidly degrading on a global scale due to human activities and climate change. Marsh-edges could be protected by...
Article
Full-text available
Shells and shell fragments are biogenic structures that are widespread throughout natural sandy shelf seas and whose presence can affect the bed roughness and erodibility of the seabed. An important and direct consequence is the effect on the formation and movement of small bedforms such as sand ripples. We experimentally measured ripple formation...
Article
Full-text available
Erosion of tidal flats is to a large degree determined by the erosion threshold of their cohesive sediments, i.e., the critical bottom shear stress identifying the onset of erosion. Given that the erodibility of tidal flats can vary strongly over both space and time, rapid in situ measuring methods for quantifying the critical bottom shear stress a...
Article
Full-text available
Wave flume facilities that are primarily designed for engineering studies are often complex and expensive to operate, and hence not ideal for long-term replicated experiments as commonly used in biology. This study describes a low-cost small wave flume that can be used for biological purposes using fresh-or seawater with or without sediment. The wa...
Preprint
Full-text available
Shells and shell fragments are biogenic structures that are widespread throughout natural sandy shelf seas and whose presence can affect the bed roughness and erodibility of the seabed. An important and direct consequence is the effect on the formation and movement of small bedforms such as sand ripples. We experimentally measured ripple formation...
Article
Full-text available
Nearshore biogenic habitats are known to trap sediments, and may therefore also accumulate biofouled, non-buoyant microplastics. Using a current-generating field flume (TiDyFLOW), we experimentally assessed the mechanisms of microplastic trapping of two size classes, 0.5 mm and 2.5 mm particle size, by three contrasting types of biogenic habitats:...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal ecosystems are increasingly threatened by global change. Insight in their resilience against increased storminess is needed for their application in nature‐based coastal defense schemes. This is often gained from flume experiments. Laboratory flumes provide excellent hydrodynamic control, but are restrictive in that it is extremely difficul...
Article
Full-text available
Seagrasses provide an important ecosystem service by creating a stable erosion‐resistant seabed that contributes to effective coastal protection. Variable morphologies and life history strategies, however, are likely to impact the sediment stabilisation capacity of different seagrass species. We question how opportunistic invasive species and incre...
Article
“Nature based” flood defence is suggested to adapt to and mitigate climate change induced sea level rise and hazards to the estuarine and coastal environment. Trees are highly effective in attenuating waves and currents in vegetated foreshores due to their growth and biophysical traits. Willows (genus Salix) stabilize riverine banks and settle in...
Article
Climate change is expected to alter temperatures and precipitation patterns, affecting river flows and hence riparian corridors. In this context we have explored the potential evolution of riparian corridors under a dryness gradient of flow regimes associated with climate change in a Mediterranean river. We have applied an advanced bio-hydromorphod...
Article
Full-text available
Large scale morphology, in particular meander bend depth, bar dimensions and bifurcation dynamics, are greatly affected by the deflection of sediment transport on transverse bed slopes due to gravity and by secondary flows. Overestimating the transverse bed slope effect in morphodynamic models leads to flattening of the morphology, while underestim...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Fluvial system components, including riparian vegetation and channel morphology, are mostly structured by the hydrological conditions of the river. Hence, alteration of these hydrological conditions would inevitably lead to changes in river morphology and riparian vegetation. Climate change is an inevitable autonomous event which is going to alter...

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
"The overall objective of this project is to develop new methods to assess how and how much vegetated foreshores can contribute to flood risk reduction through a better understanding of (uncertainties in) the long-term ecological, biogeomorphological, and hydraulic functioning and stability of these systems"
Project
The assessment of to what extent changes in river discharge that may result from climate change will affect riparian vegetation and fluvial geomorphology within a southern European context. An innovative model containing the coupling between advanced morphodynamics and dynamic vegetation (Van Oorschot et al., 2015) is applied. This process-based model simulates climate change with a natural daily discharge regime and gradually changing boundary conditions, considers the continuous interaction between vegetation and hydro-morphodynamics and includes vegetation dynamics which are crucial for evolution in river behaviour.